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a two-edged sword?

By | June 15, 2001

Vitamin C could promote production of DNA-damaging compounds and may help explain why vitamin C has thus far shown little effectiveness at preventing cancer in clinical trials.

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Events at the ends

By | June 15, 2001

Telomere position effects in human cells may account for gene expression changes as cells grow older.

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Measles virus induces regression of lymphoma

By | June 15, 2001

Measles virus can induce regression of human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

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World's most powerful NMR spectrometer delivered to Scripps Research Institute

By | June 15, 2001

The world's most powerful, high-resolution nuclear magnet resonance spectrometer provides researchers with the ability to determine structures of high molecular weight proteins and nucleic acids with much greater sensitivity and resolution.

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Fast forward to a sensitive test for prion diseases

By | June 14, 2001

Jakob disease.

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Finger arrays

By | June 14, 2001

DNA microarrays have been used to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins.

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UK working party estimates small association between depleted uranium and lung cancer

By | June 14, 2001

The association between depleted uranium in weapons and lung cancer is very small even in people exposed to high levels.

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Aventis science books prize winners announced

By | June 13, 2001

A book about the mysteries of the World's Oceans scoops science's most prestigious literary award.

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Porphyromonas gingivalis genome is on line

By | June 13, 2001

genome contains 2.3 million DNA base pairs and is the first of the bacteroides group of gram-negative anaerobes to be sequenced.

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RNomics

By | June 13, 2001

A screen for small RNA molecules has identified over 200 new small non-messenger RNAs.

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