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Transplanted neuronal cells could reverse stroke damage

By | August 24, 2000

A phase one study in which cultured human neurons were transplanted into the brains of stroke victims offers hope that new methods could be developed to restore brain function.

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Troglitazone

August 24, 2000

NEW YORK, August 18 (Praxis Press). Troglitazone, a member of a new class of antidiabetic drugs, increases insulin sensitivity and promotes adipocyte differentiation. This drug may therefore be therapeutic in patients with lipoatrophic and lipodystrophic disorders. Arioglu and colleagues studied the effects of open-label troglitazone treatment in 20 patients with lipoatrophy and insulin resistance. After 6 months of treatment, fasting triglyceride levels decreased by 2.6 mmol/L (p = 0.019); free

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Vitamin D may have preventive properties against cancer

By | August 24, 2000

LONDON, August 23 (SPIS MedWire). Vitamin D may be effective in protecting people from developing cancer. Vitamin D has not been used previously in cancer prevention because the prolonged use that would be needed could lead to osteoporosis or even death. However, a research team at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA, designed four different versions of vitamin D and tested them on mice. Dr Gary Posner reported their findings at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington

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Arrays for replication

By | August 21, 2000

DNA microarrays are normally used to detect variation in mRNA abundance. But in the August 15 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Khodursky et al. use the arrays to track the progress of replication forks in Escherichia coli (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000, 97:9419-9424). In a bacterial culture that is replicating synchronously, genomic DNA from replicated regions gives a stronger array signal than unreplicated DNA. Khodursky et al. use this signal variation to show that normal replicat

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Assembling the human genome and giving it away for free

By | August 21, 2000

Entrepreneurs looking to exploit the data collected through the Human Genome Project are to face stiff competition from a project designed to allow researchers around the world to access analysed and annotated genome information for free.

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Many ways to make a breast tumor

By | August 21, 2000

In the 17 August Nature Perou et al. present a DNA microarray analysis of 65 human breast tumor specimens from 42 different individuals (Nature 2000, 406:747-752). Of the 8,102 genes analyzed, 1,753 varied in abundance at least fourfold in at least three samples. These genes could be clustered into groups that correlated with mitotic index, regulation of the interferon pathway, and the relative abundance of endothelial cells, stromal cells, adipose cells, B or T cells and macrophages. Expression

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Preventing artery damage during angioplasty

By | August 21, 2000

Balloon catheters could be coated with ceramide to prevent damage to arteries.

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Xena: small cloned piglet

By | August 21, 2000

On 2 July 2000, a small black piglet was delivered by a white sow. Xena's dark color was a clue that she was not the warrior princess whose name she bears but the product of the first successful pig cloning from fetal cells. As reported in the 18 August Science, this cloning adds to reports of cloned sheep, cattle, and goats (Onishi et al, Science 2000, 289:1188-1190). Xena was produced using a technique developed in mice in which a nucleus from a somatic cell is microinjected into an enucleated

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Therapeutic cloning to become a reality for Britain

By | August 18, 2000

The potential therapeutic benefits of research on human embryos areenormous and outweigh the ethical and safety concerns, the UKgovernment decided this week.

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2D gels are not enough

By | August 17, 2000

A series of narrow-pH-range overloaded 2D gels, processed using sensitive silver-staining, yields enough spots that the gels could, theoretically, be surveying virtually all of the proteins of budding yeast. But in the August 15 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Gygi et al. report that proteomics proponents may have been fooling themselves (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000, 97:9390-9395). Gygi et al. select a random region of one such gel and analyze all the visible spots. The genes co

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