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Studying disease associations

By | October 23, 2001

In the Advanced Online Publication of Nature Genetics, John Ioannidis and colleagues at the University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece, describe a study to determine the reliability of disease association and genetic linkage reports (DOI:10.1038/ng749).They assembled data from published reports of 36 different disease associations, ranging from schizophrenia to hypertension. They used meta-analysis to explore the diversity and discrepancies between different studies. In 39% of c

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Bigger, better pancreatic cells

By | October 22, 2001

cells to grow larger and produce more insulin.

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Ultraviolet sensitivity

By | October 22, 2001

The systematic deletion of all yeast ORFs, the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project, provides a powerful resource for large-scale 'parallel deletion analysis'. In the October 23 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Geoff Birrell and colleagues at Stanford University School of Medicine describe a screen for sensitivity to a genome-damaging agent (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:12608-12613).They screened pools of 4,627 deletion strains for killing by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and

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without a receptor

By | October 22, 2001

subunit and may act as a receptor-independent G protein activator.

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Fly immunity

By | October 19, 2001

Studies of the response to microbial infection in Drosophila have taught us much about the conserved features of the innate immune response. In the October 23 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ennio De Gregorio and colleagues at the CNRS Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, describe a genome-wide analysis of the Drosophila immune response (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2001, 98:12590-12595).They used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to probe over 13,000 genes

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p53 mediates pregnancy protection against breast cancer

By | October 19, 2001

A pregnancy early in reproductive life is protective against breast cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that form the basis for this protective effect have not been elucidated. In the October 16 early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lakshmi Sivaraman and colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, showed that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is increased in early pregnancy in rats and mice, possibly explaining why early pregnancy is associated

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T cells can stop development of skin cancer

By | October 19, 2001

Gamma-delta T cells in the skin use evolutionarily conserved proteins to negatively regulate malignancy.

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The future's bright, the future's online

By | October 19, 2001

The resignation of an entire editorial board over journal access adds further impetus to the online publishing revolution.

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$38 million glue grant to explore cell migration

By | October 18, 2001

An international consortium of scientists from a number of disciplines have been brought together to investigate how cells move.

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Regulation of host responses by a bacterial peptide

By | October 18, 2001

ribosomal protein fragment may contribute to lymphocyte dysfunction in gastric adenocarcinoma.

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