News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Evolutionary ESTs

By | June 19, 2001

Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) identifies rapidly evolving proteins in the reproductive glands of male flies.

0 Comments

Step-by-step account of HIV-1 infection

By | June 19, 2001

In response to HIV-1 infection immune cells decrease mRNA synthesis, suppress DNA repair gene transcripts and increase expression of apoptosis inducing genes.

0 Comments

Viral protein K5 modulates T cell costimulation

By | June 19, 2001

in B cells dramatically reduces ICAM-1 and B7-2 surface expression, impairing B cell induction of T cell activation.

0 Comments

Coral bleaching aids survival in changing environments

By | June 18, 2001

Coral bleaching, traditionally thought to be a response to adverse environmental conditions, may help corals survive in changed environments.

0 Comments

Receptor structure predicts drug interactions

By | June 18, 2001

The human nuclear pregnane X receptor has a hydrophobic ligand-binding cavity with a small number of polar residues that are critical for precise pharmacologic activation.

0 Comments

The dangers of vitamin C

By | June 18, 2001

show that vitamin C induces the formation of genotoxins, explaining why it has proved ineffective as a cancer therapeutic agent.

0 Comments

a two-edged sword?

By | June 15, 2001

Vitamin C could promote production of DNA-damaging compounds and may help explain why vitamin C has thus far shown little effectiveness at preventing cancer in clinical trials.

0 Comments

Events at the ends

By | June 15, 2001

Telomere position effects in human cells may account for gene expression changes as cells grow older.

0 Comments

Measles virus induces regression of lymphoma

By | June 15, 2001

Measles virus can induce regression of human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

0 Comments

World's most powerful NMR spectrometer delivered to Scripps Research Institute

By | June 15, 2001

The world's most powerful, high-resolution nuclear magnet resonance spectrometer provides researchers with the ability to determine structures of high molecular weight proteins and nucleic acids with much greater sensitivity and resolution.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
  2. What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science
    News Analysis What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

    A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

  3. Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”
  4. Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution
Business Birmingham