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Double-duplication evolution

By | September 6, 2000

In the 1 September Science Lang et al. argue that two single-domain biosynthetic enzymes appear to have evolved from gene duplication, followed by fusion, followed by a second gene duplication (Science 2000, 289:1546-1550). Both of the proteins, HisA and HisF, can be broken down into two half beta/alpha barrels. The four half barrels can be superimposed on each other, revealing 22% identical or similar residues. As both enzymes bind biphosphate substrates, each half barrel has a phosphate-bindin

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Repair polymerases in a double act

By | September 6, 2000

Two eukaryotic DNA polymerases act sequentially to repair DNA lesions.

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A potential therapeutic mechanism for regulating cholesterol uptake

By | September 5, 2000

Retinoid receptors play a key part in cholesterol homeostasis.

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Parkinson's disease not restricted to the brain

By | September 5, 2000

LONDON, September 5 (SPIS MedWire). Parkinson's disease may not be restricted to the brain; it could also cause the loss of nerve terminals in the heart, according to new research. Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Maryland, USA, carried out positron emission tomography scans on 29 Parkinson's disease patients. Nearly all had reduced numbers of norepinephrine-producing nerve endings in the heart. This decrease was not related to whether the patien

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Cholesterol levels drop after myocardial infarction

By | September 4, 2000

A recent study suggests that lipids should be measured routinely on admission in acute coronary syndromes.

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Creating protein folds

By | September 4, 2000

An exon, the basic unit of DNA that gets shuffled around during evolution, has an average coding capacity of 40 amino acids, or roughly half of a small folded protein domain. Exon exchange between homologous proteins can lead to slightly altered proteins, but in the August 29 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Riechmann and Winter ask whether shuffling between unrelated sequences can generate new folds (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000, 97:10068-10073). Their starting material is DNA enc

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Keep taking the pills

By | September 4, 2000

The placebo effect may lead to a significant skew in clinical trials of heart treatments.

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Promiscuity in Trinidad

By | September 4, 2000

Female Trinidadian guppies often mate with multiple males, because the resultant offspring show substantially increased fitness.

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Sequence of a big bug

By | September 4, 2000

, the bug responsible for most cystic fibrosis deaths, reveals lots of pumps and lots of regulation.

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Cardiologists expand definition of MI

By | September 1, 2000

Transatlantic coalition of cardiologists redefine infarction so that severe angina may now be called a heart attack.

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