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NEW YORK, July 17 (Praxis Press) Maternal toxoplasmosis can have devastating consequences for the baby; however, the main risk factors associated with this infection have not been well defined. In a European case-control study, Cook and colleagues evaluated the role of food and environmental factors in acute toxoplasmosis among pregnant women (see paper). Eating undercooked and cured meat accounted for 30% to 63% of infections at the six study centers; other significant risk factors included soi

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Triple therapy safety

July 21, 2000

NEW YORK, July 18 (Praxis Press) Multidrug antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but the long-term effects and safety of this treatment are unknown. Gulick and colleagues studied the durability and toxicity associated with combined indinavir, zidovudine and lamivudine therapy in HIV-infected patients (see paper). Almost 65% of patients continued therapy for three years. Serum viral loads remained suppressed

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Devil's in the detail of UK science boost

By | July 20, 2000

"Genuinely very good news" to "cautiously optimistic" covers the range of reactions among scientists to a UK research spending hike.

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launches first paper

By | July 20, 2000

's first peer reviewed and accepted paper is published this week.

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Rice - the prequel

By | July 20, 2000

Researchers hoping to decipher the first complete genome sequence of a plant fear the lengthy clusters of repeated transposon sequences present in many plant genomes. But in the July issue of Genome Research, Mao et al. report promising news for the international consortium tackling the rice genome (Genome Res. 2000, 10:982-990). After sequencing 73,000 DNA fragments distributed through the rice genome (a total of nearly 50 Mb), Mao et al. find that less than 10% of the sequences contain transpo

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Human mad cow disease rising - or is it?

By | July 19, 2000

British experts try to have it both ways in the prediction of the trends in variant CJD.

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Simulated fly segmentation

By | July 19, 2000

A compendium of expression profiles from mutant yeast strains allows function to be attributed to uncharacterized genes and leads to the identification of a drug target.

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French refusal to pull up GMO "contaminated" maize splits government

By | July 18, 2000

artificial gene constructs are causing political controversy in France.

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Mad meiosis

By | July 18, 2000

Mad2p is a budding yeast protein that helps to delay progression through mitosis until errors in chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle are corrected. In the 14 July Science Shonn et al. find that this spindle checkpoint is also required during meiosis (Science 2000, 289:300-303). Cells without Mad2p show increased chromosome segregation errors during budding yeast meiosis I, when homologs separate, but appear normal during meiosis II, when sister chromatids separate. Meiosis I may fare le

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Royal Society says UK science spending halved

By | July 17, 2000

D funding has fallen by more than half in fifteen years.

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