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image: Human Proteome Mapped Again

Human Proteome Mapped Again

By | January 22, 2015

Researchers complete another interactive protein atlas, boosting the number of publicly available maps of human protein expression levels.


image: Benefits of Missing MYC

Benefits of Missing MYC

By | January 22, 2015

Mice engineered to have just one copy of the gene Myc live longer, healthier lives than wild-type animals.

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.


image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.


image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  


image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.


image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts


image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

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image: Vanishing Y Chromosomes

Vanishing Y Chromosomes

By | December 4, 2014

A new study reveals an association between smoking and rates of Y chromosome loss in blood cells, which may explain elevated cancer risk among male smokers.

1 Comment

image: Bat Navigation Revealed

Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.


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