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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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Scientists generate tumor-targeting molecules that can be used for imaging and treatment.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 11, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

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image: No Pain, Big Gain

No Pain, Big Gain

By | May 22, 2014

Eliminating a pain receptor makes mice live longer and keeps their metabolisms young.

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image: Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

By | May 18, 2014

An algorithm can pick out biologically and clinically meaningful variants from whole-exome sequences of tumors.

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image: How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

By | May 15, 2014

Researchers uncover a self-recognition mechanism that prevents octopus limbs from becoming entangled, despite their powerful suction.

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image: Controlling Self-Awareness During Sleep

Controlling Self-Awareness During Sleep

By | May 11, 2014

Changing neural activity in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain can cause a sleeper to become aware of her dreaming state, a study shows. 

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image: Exercise Can Erase Memories

Exercise Can Erase Memories

By | May 8, 2014

Running causes rodents to forget their fears in part because of increased hippocampal neurogenesis, a study shows.

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image: Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

By | May 7, 2014

Once considered neurotransmission-related noise, scientists now show that the spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles is imperative for the maturation of Drosophila synapses.

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