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image: 2013’s Big Advances in Science

2013’s Big Advances in Science

By | December 24, 2013

A roundup of the stunning progress made in the life sciences this year

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

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image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

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image: CRISPR for Cures?

CRISPR for Cures?

By | December 5, 2013

Studies in mice and human stem cells demonstrate that the genome-editing technique CRISPR can correct disease-causing mutations.

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image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

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image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

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image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

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image: Faulty Freezing

Faulty Freezing

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that tissues are more likely than single cells to suffer damage during cryopreservation because of the tight junctions between cells.

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