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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

By | April 6, 2015

A tumor-secreted protein interferes with insulin signaling to cause cancer-linked muscle wasting in fruit flies. 

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image: Personalized Cancer Vaccines

Personalized Cancer Vaccines

By | April 2, 2015

A dendritic cell vaccine targeting melanoma patients’ tumor-specific mutations can activate a broad range of cancer-fighting T cells. 

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image: Opinion: Upgrading Cancer Prevention

Opinion: Upgrading Cancer Prevention

By | April 1, 2015

Preemptive detection and intervention will be key to easing the growing burden of cancer, particularly in developing countries.

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image: Opinion: Making Cancer Vaccines Work

Opinion: Making Cancer Vaccines Work

By | March 31, 2015

Armed with the right adjuvant system, vaccines are poised to tackle one of the world’s most intractable diseases. 

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

By | February 23, 2015

Scientists develop synthetic blood-based biomarkers to amplify tumor signals in a mouse model.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

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image: Culturing Changes Cells

Culturing Changes Cells

By | February 3, 2015

Within days of their transfer to a dish, a certain epigenetic mark vanishes from mouse cells.

2 Comments

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