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In the middle of the 20th century, the National Cancer Institute began testing plant extracts for chemotherapeutic potential—helping to discover some drugs still in use today.

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Despite an overall decrease in the number of US cancer deaths, some cancer types are on the rise, and disparities remain between genders and ethnicities.

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image: Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

By | April 1, 2017

At the University of California, Santa Cruz, the researcher combs the cancer genome, looking for weaknesses.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Politics of Cancer</em>

Book Excerpt from The Politics of Cancer

By | April 1, 2017

In Chapter 2, “Identifying the Culprits,” author Wendy Whitman Cobb describes how small-government, anti-regulation conservatism can hinder the fight against cancer.

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By | April 1, 2017

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Cooking Up Cancer?

Cooking Up Cancer?

By | April 1, 2017

Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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