Magazine

» lncRNA, histones and epigenetics

Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: The Role of DNA Base Modifications

The Role of DNA Base Modifications

By | September 1, 2017

Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.

3 Comments

image: Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

By | July 17, 2017

The memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.

0 Comments

image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

1 Comment

image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

2 Comments

image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

3 Comments

image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

0 Comments

image: Researchers Grow “Frankenstein Ants” to Study Epigenetics

Researchers Grow “Frankenstein Ants” to Study Epigenetics

By | October 1, 2016

A molecular biologist ventures into entomology to use genetically modified ants as laboratory models of behavioral epigenetics.

1 Comment

image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

1 Comment

image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes
  2. Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern Humans
  3. Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape
  4. Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?
RayBiotech