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All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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RNA Epigenetics

By , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Ghosts in the Genome

By | December 1, 2015

How one generation’s experience can affect the next

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Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

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Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

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