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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 17, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.

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image: Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

By | July 17, 2017

Activists demanded greater access to and involvement in clinical research for AIDS treatments—and their protests were heard.

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

By | July 17, 2017

The memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.

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New methods could propel investigation of neural “PGO” wave patterns that may underlie critical aspects of visual experience, dreaming, and even psychosis.

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