Magazine

Most Recent

image: Inner Ear Undertakers

Inner Ear Undertakers

By | September 1, 2015

Support cells in the inner ear respond differently to two drugs that kill hair cells.

0 Comments

image: Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

By | September 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology University of California, Riverside. Age: 44

1 Comment

image: Lending an Ear

Lending an Ear

By | September 1, 2015

Until recently, auditory brainstem implants have been restricted to patients with tumors on their auditory nerves.

0 Comments

image: Musical Scales

Musical Scales

By | September 1, 2015

The quest to document an ancient sea creature reveals a cyclical chorus of fish songs.

0 Comments

image: Orchestrating Organoids

Orchestrating Organoids

By | September 1, 2015

A guide to crafting tissues in a dish that reprise in vivo organs

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Ears Have It

The Ears Have It

By | September 1, 2015

A teaching obligation in graduate school introduced James Hudspeth to a career focused on how vertebrates sense sounds.

0 Comments

image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

1 Comment

image: The Sounds of Silence

The Sounds of Silence

By | September 1, 2015

Science-based tinnitus therapeutics are finally coming into their own.

3 Comments

image: The Upside

The Upside

By | September 1, 2015

Researchers explore the benefits of hearing loss and impairment.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Simulating Scientific Sabotage, For Fun
  4. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies