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Keith Davies has made Chemical Design a world leader in molecular modeling LONDON—By now we’ve all seen the numbers and heard the gloomy forecasts. Science in the United Kingdom is suffering from a dearth of funding, incentives, and political clout. The lack of commitment to R&D on the part of both the private and public sectors in Britain has sparked an alarming emigration of scientists and high-tech entrepreneurs. But for every rule there is an exception, and Keith Davies is

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{WantNoCacheVal} How A Research Proposal Moves Through NIH When a grant proposal arrives at NIH's, Bethesda. Md., headquarters it is routed directly to the agency's Division of Research Grants. There, one of a dozen or so "referral officers" identifies the scientific field to the most appropriate of the agency's 93 standing commit- tees review to the so-called "study sections." A study section consists of from 14 to 20 scientists representing a widerange of specialties: The Surgery, Anesthesi

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How Bill Hewlett And I Wound Up In A Palo Alto Garage

By | September 5, 1988

How Bill Hewlett And I Wound Up In A Palo Alto Garage Palo Alto Garage AUTHOR:DAVID PACKARD Date: September 05, 1988 [Ed. note: In January 1939, five years after he graduated from Stanford, David Packard cofounded Hewlett-Packard Co. with former classmate William Hewlett. The two friends’ original partnership arrangement was so informal that neither man is sure what date it was signed. And like many new companies, Hewlett-Packard teetered on the brink of financial disaster. During the fir

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Industry Briefs

September 5, 1988

Despite recent corporate shake-ups at Philadelphia’s Smith Kline & French Laboratories, the R&D scientists will remain unscathed, according to the company. “We will invest more dollars in R&D in 1989 than we did in 1988,” Viewed Henry Wendt, SmithKline Beckman chairman and chief executive officer, when the resignation of Stanley T. Crooke, head of R&D, was announced August 10. The company—which employs 2,100 research personnel—has an R&D budget this year of $250

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Inside Bell Labs: Excitement On The Bench; Concern on High

By | September 5, 1988

Inside Bell Labs: Excitement On The Bench; Concern On High AUTHOR: SHARON BEGLEY Date: September 05, 1988 Researchers have never felt freer, but some lab heads and a prominent former manager see major changes since divestiture The stockholder was annoyed. Why, he demanded, was AT&T paying Thomas Gradel, a middle-aged scientist, to tromp around the Jungles of Brazil studying ants, when the dollars could be better used to fatten up Bell’s notoriously meager dividends? The irate stoc

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Kaiser, Chemist, Is Dead At 50

September 5, 1988

Emil Thomas Kaiser, the Patrick E. and Beatrice M. Haggerty Professor of The Rockefeller University in New York, died on July 18, at the age of 50, from immunosuppressive complications after kidney transplant surgery at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Kaiser was a member of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. He also served on the editorial board of The Journal of the American Chemical Society, the National Institutes of Health panel evaluatin

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

In connection with a recent surge of criticism of science, much has been said about the self-correcting capacity of science. Unfortunately, the Stewart and Feder “affair” (The Scientist, July 11, page 1) shows that this process hardly works in real-life situations. Instead of being praised for their effort and devotion to uncover fraud in science, these two researchers have been charged with “indulging in scientific McCarthyism and even treason.” Other members of the

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

I read with great interest your article on NIH researchers Walter Stewart and Ned Feder, who are investigating scientists for fraud and other misconduct. I think that the article did a good job in pointing out something quite different from what was intended, namely, the closed shop or “guild” mentality of the scientific community. The fact of the matter is that scientific research is a business, just like the music industry, the auto industry, or television repair. Witness J

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

I found Dilsaver’s and Coffman’s opinion column on funding for AIDS and psychiatric research (The Scientist, July 11, page 11) both provoking and disturbing. By inviting comparison, debate, and scrutiny between research agendas—perhaps in response to Frank Press’s call (The Scientist, May 30, page 1) to set research priorities within the scientific community—the article provokes useful discussion. Yet by misrepresenting the tragedy of AIDS and by misapprehendin

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

Concerning the article by Rex Dalton “Should Reviewers Sign Their Critiques?” (The Scientist, July 11, page 5), my answer to the question would be emphatically “yes!” The arguments against it are unrealistic. Reviewers should have accountability. I have a modest proposal an Author’s Bill of Rights, which follows: 1. The reviewer should have credentials of scholarship equal to those required of the author. (Passing the paper to the postdoc down the hall from th

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