Advertisement

Magazine

Most Recent

Growing Up Saturated With Science

By | December 14, 1987

U my life I have been on the edges of science. At the start of the century, my father, J.S. Haldane, deeply engaged in the problem of alveolar air, probably didn’t notice that I was having fun on the lab floor, playing with blobs of mercury and occasionally licking them. I knew even then that science was important; and I was very proud of having small blood samples taken for some purpose. Later my brother, J.B.S. Haldane, and I discovered chemistry and made splendid volcanoes in the gard

0 Comments

Happenings

December 14, 1987

Edward J. Poziomek, former director of research, U.S. Army Chemical Research at the Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., became Sigma Xi’s new executive director on December 1. Poziomek joined the society in 1961 and has served on the board of directors since 1976. His areas of research include surface chemistry, spectroscopy, physical-organic chemistry and organic synthesis. Charles E. Hammer Jr., associate vice president for health affairs and professor

0 Comments

I Am Not Optimistic

By | December 14, 1987

There are differences of opinion over the precise definition of scientific misconduct and over how to deal with it. We also don’t have a very good idea on how often it occurs. It probably is not unreasonable to assume, however, that it happens much more frequently than the few highly publicized cases would suggest—if only because it is unlikely that all instances of misconduct are discovered and, of those discovered, that all become public knowledge. Moreover, my own experience s

0 Comments

I Turned in My Mentor

By | December 14, 1987

Although it is painful to recount, I think it will be beneficial to share my experiences as a whistle blower—in my case, a postdoctoral fellow who had the “audacity” to commit such an act against his mentor. I arrived at Case Western Reserve Univer sity in Cleveland in 1979 to do a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Philip W. Lambert an endocrine researcher. My first year of research went well and I was awarded a National Research Service Award from the National I

0 Comments

Is There Room in Science for Self-Promotion?

By | December 14, 1987

Scientific fraud has received much attention lately, both within the scientific community and increasingly beyond it. In this issue, in fact, you will find continuing discussions of the problem and its impact. (See pp. 11-13.) Unfortunately, some journalists with a taste for the sensational have exaggerated its frequency. The obvious example is William Broad and Nicholas Wade’s Betrayers of Truth (Simon & Schuster, 1982). (On the other hand, careful science journalists have detected genui

0 Comments

Journal to Ask For Prior Filing Of Gene Data

By | December 14, 1987

LOS ALAMOS, N.M.—A British journal has taken a carrot-and-stick approach to encourage scientists to make their data on nucleotide sequences available quickly to the international research community. The controversial approach is being watched closely by officials of GenBank, the U.S.-funded project here that is expanding its data collection efforts. Beginning January 1, the journal Nucleic Acids Research will require authors to prove that their data have already been submitted to the E

0 Comments

Letters

By | December 14, 1987

I was delighted to see a photograph of Friedrich August Kekulé, one of the architects of the structural theory of organic chemistry, in Science Archive (September 7, 1987, P. 28). You describe the dream that led to the ring structure for benzene, a structure he first proposed in 1865. He divulged the origin of that idea 25 years later at a celebration hosted by the chemical industry that gained immeasurably from that one proposal. The benzene dream was the second he described, the first be

0 Comments

WASHINGTON—The American Society of Mechanical Engineers has thrown a life buoy to the Marine Technology Society. The support comes in the form of a two-year, interest-bearing loan and a temporary donation of office space, worth a total of $200,000. MTS, a 25-year-old interdisciplinary society, derives its $350,000 annual budget from dues of its 2,500 members, conference fees and publication sales, but the prolonged crisis in’the oil and gas drilling industry has put a squeeze on t

0 Comments

Long-Term NIH Grants Raise Doubts

By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—Recent increases in the number and type of longterm grants from the National Institutes of Health may intensify competition between new awards and grants continued from previous years. But officials say the self-limiting nature of the new longterm grants and new institute controls should prevent problems that forced elimination of seven-year awards in the 1970s. “In any given year, about 85 percent of the NIH budget is a commitment [to grants] from previous years,”

0 Comments

Mayor Charts UNESCO's Course

By | December 14, 1987

Spanish biochemist and administrator Federico Mayor Zaragoza, who on November 15 began a six-year term as director-general of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, picks up the reins at a critical time for the institution. One challenge is to reverse Western nations’ sense of alienation from UNESCO, and to induce the United States, the United Kingdom and Singapore, which withdrew from the organization in 1984-85, to return to the fold, adding their funding

0 Comments

Advertisement
Thermo Scientific
Thermo Scientific

Popular Now

  1. How Fats Influence the Microbiome
  2. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  3. Censored Professor Quits
    The Nutshell Censored Professor Quits

    Alice Dreger is resigning from the faculty of Northwestern University, claiming that the administration censored her work in a faculty journal.

  4. Mitochondria Exchange
    News Analysis Mitochondria Exchange

    A decade of research on intercellular mitochondrial transfer has answered some long-standing questions and raised new ones.

Advertisement
Advertisement