Magazine

Most Recent

“Man’s moral sense has not kept pace with his scientific knowledge.” “Humans have discovered secrets hitherto kept hidden, but not learned to use them well.” In the early 1950s, it was good sport for cliché collectors to count the number of times a week they heard assertions of this sort. The threatening science was nuclear physics, and the shock of Hiroshima was still producing understandable moral queasiness. What we now call life sciences were thought

0 Comments

Science Grants

September 5, 1988

Below is a list of notable grants recently awarded In the scIences—large fedreal grants as well as awards of all sizes from private foundations. The individual cited with each entry Is the project’s principal Investigator. Olfactory and neuroendocrine functions. $1.9 million over seven years from the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke to Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury Mass.: F. Macrides Resistance to anticancer d

0 Comments

Science Grants

September 5, 1988

Below is a list of notable grants recently awarded In the scIences—large fedreal grants as well as awards of all sizes from private foundations. The individual cited with each entry Is the project’s principal Investigator. Olfactory and neuroendocrine functions. $1.9 million over seven years from the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke to Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury Mass.: F. Macrides Resistance to anticancer d

0 Comments

Scientists, Face It! Science And Religion Are Incompatible

By | September 5, 1988

The highly visible conflict between evolutionary biology and creationism has stimulated much com- mentary in the scientific press about the relationship between science and religion. The Scientist Science, Nature, and many other journals have given much space to tbe issue. Even the National Academy of Sciences has issued a statement on science and religion. A clear consensus emerges from this outpouring of literature. Scientists vigorously claim that no conflict exists between science and 

0 Comments

Tools Aim To Ease Burden Of Do-It-Yourself Programming

By | September 5, 1988

Most people working with personal computers don’t have degrees in computer science and don’t write their own programs. But in the population of people who do program, scientists make up a large percentage. Off-the-shelf software often doesn’t provide just what laboratory scientists are looking for therefore, many of them tinker with altering these store-bought packages or develop their own. If you do a little programming on an IBM PC, you should know that some reasonably pri

0 Comments

At its annual meeting in June, the Iondon-based Royal Society elected one new fellow and six new foreign members. Also at the meeting, the Council of the Society announced the recipients of its medals and honors for 1988. In honor of her contributions to the history of contemporary science, Margaret Gowing was elected a fellow of the society. Cowing, a specialist on the implications of atomic energy in Britain and the person responsible for establishing the Contemporary Scientific Archives

0 Comments

U.S. Visibility High At International Biotech Show

By | September 5, 1988

Anyone doubting the United States’ significance in the international biotechnology arena should take wing to Hanover, West Germany, later this month and see the impressive showing the US. will make at Biotechnica 88—the Fourth International Trade Fair and Congress for Biotechnology. Far and away the largest non-German contingent among the 400-plus exhibitors, US. representation continues a pattern of increasing Visibility in the biotech sector. The pattern was clearly astablished

0 Comments

According to numbers put together in August by the University of California, San Francisco, its School of Medicine’s fiscal 1988 support from the National Institutes of Health had reached the $110 million level While the official total for the year will he made by NIH, UCSF’s preliminary reckoning shows an $8 million increase in NIH support compared with last year. This in-house figure, however, suffices as a strong indication that UCSF will rank first among U.S. medical schools

0 Comments

Why Scientists Shouldn't Cast Stones

By | September 5, 1988

European visitors to the United States often remark on the surprising power and influence of religion in this country. Religion in Europe is largely a private and individual activity. In the U.S., in contrast, religion continually overflows into politics and other aspects of daily life. We recently had a serious presidential candidate who claimed that God told himto run for office. And strong, vocal groups have been calling for such practices as school prayer and the teaching of Biblical crea

0 Comments

'Drastic' Improvement Seen In Mass Spectrometers

By | August 8, 1988

Recent technological advances have vastly improved the mass range and resolution capabilities of mass spectrometers, while making these instruments more versatile and easier to use. “We can work with smaller and smaller amounts of material because the instrumentation sensitivities have improved so drastically over the last few years,” says J. Carter Cook, director of VG Instruments’ laboratory in Savannah, Georgia. Other improvements include advances in computerization t

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS