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Graham Shakes Up U.S. Biotech Panel

By | November 2, 1987

ITHACA, N.Y.—Two years after its creation, the Reagan administration’s policy council for coordinating biotechnology regulation faces an uncertain future. Presidential science adviser William Graham has decided to replace the Biotechnology Science Coordinating Committee (BSCC) with a group more directly under his control. Two weeks ago he told THE SCIENTIST that “BSCC has been suspended. it is no longer in operation.” A clause in the BSCC charter required review and

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Happenings

November 2, 1987

John Simpson, University of Chicago physicist, was named the third Martin Marietta Chair in Space History by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington. Simpson designed and built U.S. instruments that were carried aboard Soviet spacecraft to encounter Halley’s Comet in 1986. During his year as chair, he will work with the Air and Space Museum and the University of Chicago to prepare historical accounts of his accomplishments. G. Tom Shires, professor

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It's a Fake! It's Genuine!--You Decide

By | November 2, 1987

THE FEATHERS FLY Is Archaeopteryx a Fake? A special temporary exhibition in the British Museum (Natural History), London, UK. Opened August 18, 1987. In 1985, the astronomers Fred Hoyle and Chandra Wickramasing he wrote an article in the British Journal of Photography claiming that Archaeopteryx is a fake. An ordinary dinosaur fossil, they suggested, had been treated with a paste of powdered limestone, into which bird feathers had been pressed in order to create the illusion of an extraordin

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Let's Revitalize Math Education

By | November 2, 1987

Last spring I pointed to student participation in research as a way to improve undergraduate science education and promised to focus subsequently on precollege science education. (THE SCIENTIST, March 23, 1987, p. 9.) One key strategy for improving science education is the revitalization of elementary and secondary school math instruction. Mathematics is said to be the “queen of the sciences.” Indeed, it is basic to achievement in almost every field of science. But in the court

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Letters

By | November 2, 1987

As editor of a popular science magazine, I read Bruce Lewenstein’s article on the “arrogance” of popular science magazines (July 13, 1987, p. 12) and Isaac Asimov’s dissenting letter (September 7, 1987, p. 10) with great interest. They’re both right. Lewenstein points out that the demise of Science ‘86, Science Digest, and SciQuest holds an important lesson: relevance is in the eye of the reader. Scientists may be excited by decaying protons, but most peopl

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Mayor Hopes To Restore UNESCO Cuts

By | November 2, 1987

PARIS—American and British officials say that the selection of Spanish biochemist Federico Mayor Zaragoza as director-general of UNESCO is not enough to secure their return to the scientific and cultural agency they abandoned. But Mayor’s nomination October 18 by the 50-member executive board is being seen as an opportunity to correct some of the problems in spending and organization that have grown up during the 13-year reign of Senegal’s Amadou Mahear M’Bow. The 53-

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WASHINGTON—Since 1950, more than 2,000 Japanese researchers have passed through the National Institutes of Health—more than from any other foreign country. Now, in NIH’s centennial year, members of that group have formed the first NIH alumni association chapter overseas. Osamu Hayaishi, who in 195 1-52 was among the first Japanese scientists to visit NIH, said the NIH Alumni Association in Japan has been established “to express our gratitude to NIH and also to cultivat

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NIH Staff Faces Broader AIDS Testing

By | November 2, 1987

WASHINGTON—The National Institutes of Health is tightening monitoring and information programs for researchers and other staff who handle the AIDS virus. The new effort follows the announcement October 8 that a second worker has become infected, apparently in an accident at an contract facility. Some scien tists have also questioned whether current safety guidelines are adequate to deal with the dangers posed by working with the virus. The new procedures will require workers in the inst

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Odhiambo on Science in Africa

By | November 2, 1987

Thomas R. Odhiambo, founder and director of ICIPE (the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology) in Nairobi. has won international recognition for his efforts as a scientist, educator and administrator to mobilize support for science in Africa. As a child in Kenya he developed a curiosity about wasps that helped inspire his later studies at Makerere University in Uganda and at Cambridge University in England, where he received a Ph.D. in insect physiology in 1965. After stints as

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Pugwash Is Alive and Well, Thank You

By | November 2, 1987

Frank Barnaby’s article “The Pugwash Conference Turns 30” (THE SCIENTIST, June 29, 1987, p. 11)is, on the whole, a fair assessment of the early accomplishments of Pugwash; but it does not do justice to its activities and development during the past decade. For example, Barnaby states that Pugwash “has already begun to fade away, leaving its goal of complete nuclear disarmament still totally unfulfilled.” That goal remains the centerpiece of Pugwash’s hope fo

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