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The committee finds no evidence to suggest that learning occurs during verified sleep (confirmed by such [measurements] as electrical recordings of brain activity). However, waking perception and interpretation of verbal material could well be altered by presenting that material during the lighter stages of sleep. We conclude that the existence and degree of learning and recall of materials presented during sleep should be examined again as a basic research problem. Many studies have found t

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Proposed Biotech Policy Board Debated

By | February 8, 1988

Washington - A proposal for a permanent body to stimulate biotechnology research and its commercial applications has triggered political tug-of-War over the right to shape federal policy. The Senate is expected to act a early as this spring on a bill (S. 1966) to set up a National Biotechnology Policy Board with 20 members drawn from government agencies, industry and academia. The board would be a permanent body within the executive branch and would produce a report every two years, beginning

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RADIATION AND HEALTH

By | February 8, 1988

Radiobiology's War of Words RADIATION AND HEALTH The Biological Effects of Low-Level Exposure to Ionizing Radiation. Robin Russell Jones and Richard Southwood, eds. John Wiley&Sons, New York, 1987. 292 pp. $41.95. BY JOHN R. TOTTER The debate over the harmfulness of penetrating radiation is of interest not only to the scientific community but also to the general public. It has affected the development of civilian nuclear energy in many countries; in the United States it has contributed to t

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Reducing the Risks of HIV Research

By | February 8, 1988

When the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science opens in Boston later this week, eight of its scores of sessions will deal with AIDS. That is far more attention than the meeting allocates to any other single topic. Even superconductivity, the glamour kid of science, gets only two. Despite all those days of discussion, judging by the condensed program available in advance of the meeting, the organizers have ignored a critical aspect of AIDS research: the safet

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Science as a Religious Search for Knowledge Q: What is your view of the burgeoning of Islamic fundamentalism in the Middle East today? SALAM: I am well aware that I have made myself unpopular in certain quarters by refusing to endorse many of these developments. I believe that some of the things now happening in those countries are not in line with the teachings to be found in the Koran. For me they represent an aberration of true Islamic teaching. Q: One of your interests is the relationshi

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EUGENE, Ore. - For six days last month defense witnesses testified that Roger Smith Troen made a "choice of evils" when he participated in the October, 1986 theft of about 125 research animals from a University of Oregon psychology laboratory (see THE SCIENTIST December 14, p.1). On the seventh day, Lane County Circuit Judge Edwin Allen said he would hear no more of it. The lengthy pretrial hearing failed to convince Allen that a seldom-used state law of evidence should apply to Troen's animal

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So They Say

February 8, 1988

A Niche for Reagan's AIDS Commission A New Yawning Theory International Cooperation: Possible But Not Practical R&D's New Role Who's the Bumblingest Of Them All? Who Will Be the Lucky One? Beyond the Three Rs The more important function for which the [Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus] . . . commission might be uniquely situated is to remove bureaucratic impediments to research. Fundamental investigation in virology, pathology and drug therapy must be given its

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Sociobiologist Gets Public Apology

By | February 8, 1988

LONDON -The publisher of a prestigious academic dictionary has apologized in print to an Oxford b ologist for misrepresenting his views on sociobiology and has revised the entry in a new version of the dictionary just released. The biologist, Paul Harvey, was angered when he received a sample copy of The Dictionary of Personality and Social Psychology in the fall of 1986. The dictionary, published by Basil Blackwell Ltd. in Britain and the MIT Press in the United States, was one of three deriv

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The Soviet government has informed AAAS that the following scientists will speak on these topics: Y. VELIKHOV, vice president, USSR Academy of Sciences, A review of Soviet progress in science; K. FROLOV vice president, USSR Academy of Sciences, head, machine study section; no title. E. SOKOLOV head, general biology section, USSR Academy of Sciences, The rational uses of biological resources and their protection; Zh. ALFEROV, director, Joffe Physical Technical Institute, The development of semi

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Temporary Work: Is It For You?

By | February 8, 1988

This is the last of a three-part series on temporary staffing in science.

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