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Detecting Radar's Development

By | October 19, 1987

RADAR IN WORLD WAR II Vol. I and II Henry E. Guerlac. Tomash/American Institute of Physics, New York, 1987.1,255 pp. $110. The American Institute of Physics and Tomash Publishers have performed a great service by publishing, after 40 years, Henry Guerlac’s outstanding history of the development of microwave radar in World War II. Until now, this unique document has been available only on the shelves of a few libraries as a collection of loose pages. Its intended publication after the war

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ESF's Seibold On Forging Links For European Science

By | October 19, 1987

When Eugene Seibold —German marine geologist, doyen of European science policy and president of the European Science Foundation (ESF)—f aces the problems of organizing international collaboration on the linguistically and culturally divided European continent, he says he is a realist. In Europe, where it’s unheard of for a French academic, for example, to be given a professorship in a German university, any real integration is unlikely “for another 200 years.” Seib

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Ethiopia to Form Science Center

By | October 19, 1987

ADDIS ABABA—Ethtiopia’s military government is moving rapidly to create a National Science Center to force the pace of technical change in one of the world’s poorest countries. The center is an outgrowth of the increased support for science expressed in the country’s new constitution, approved in May and put into effect last month. The idea for a center comes largely from Abebe Muluneh a civil engineer in his late 40s who heads the country’s Science and Technolog

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Fear of Suits Blocks Retractions

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—The fear of lawsuits is blocking efforts to purge the scientific literature of articles by psychologist Stephen Breuning that are based on fraudulent data. The National Institute of Mental Health concluded this spring that Breuning “knowingly, willfully and repeatedly engaged in misleading and deceptive practices in reporting results of research.” Although all journal editors who published Breuning’s questionable papers were sent copies of the NIMH report, on

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Forget Affirmative Action. Think National Survival

By | October 19, 1987

American women have made remarkable inroads into the community of scientists, particularly over the past decade and a half, but the increase in their participation has stopped well short of equality with men either in numbers or in opportunities. Although the problems women continue to encounter are formidable, the nation’s need for them is growing, and change in their status appears inevitable. With rare exceptions, American women are relative latecomers to science. Their representatio

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Forthcoming Books

October 19, 1987

Darkness at Night: A Riddle of the Universe. Edward Harrison. Harvard University Press: October 30, 264 pp, $25. Explores the phenomenon of darkness in the night sky by tracing answers and theories that in the past have proven wrong, looking at the structure and age of the universe, and examining the nature of light. BIOCHEMISTRY General Principles of BIochemistry of the Elements. Volume 7. Eilchiro Ochiai. Plenum Publishing: October, 450 pp, $79.50. Discusses global aspects of the biochemis

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Happenings

October 19, 1987

PEOPLE The Federation of American Scientists chose six new council members this summer: Julius Axelrod, Nobel laureate, National Institute of Mental Health; Deborah Bleviss, executive director, International Institute for Energy Conservation; Dudley R. Herschbach, Nobel laureate, professor of science, Harvard University; Art Hobson, professor of physics, University of Arkansas; Stephen H. Schneider, deputy director, National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Study Program and Robert A.

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HHMI Spends $30 Million On Undergrads

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—Taking its cue from recent studies that point to a funding gap in science education at liberal arts colleges, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has begun a program to upgrade science curricula at selected undergraduate institutions. HHMI has invited 76 liberal arts colleges not affiliated with any Ph.D.-granting university and 18 historically black colleges to compete for the grants, which will range from $500,000 to $2 million. The winners will be announced next sp

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Institute Tackles Minority Concerns

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—Organizers of a new effort to carve out a larger role for minorities in science and technology, faced with a shortage of people in the various disciplines, believe the solution lies in part with making better use of the minority scientists that do exist. “The money is secondary at this point,” explained Melvin Thompson, director of the Institute on Science, Space and Technology to be housed at Howard University. “We’ll attract the resources we need by

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Iowa Ties Rebound to Biotech Express

By | October 19, 1987

AMES, IOWA—The idea that biotechnology can help pull Iowa out of its worst economic crisis in 50 years has won converts in state government and stimulated the interest of companies worldwide. But the millions of dollars flowing into Iowa universities have not altered the view of scientists here that basic research cannot produce a short-term economic bonanza. Throughout the country, states are scrambling to amass expertise in biotechnology and related fields. An array of centers of exce

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