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Funding Briefs

August 8, 1988

More research money may be going to AIDS, but other immune deficiences are still underfunded and under-researched, says Marcia Boyle, president of the Immune Deficiency Disease Foundation. To encourage work on the primary immune deficiencies, the foundation is starting a faculty development award of $20,000 for each of three years to go to a young researcher in the first three years of a faculty appointment. The award will be funded by pharmaceutical supplier Cutter Biological, a subsidiary of

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Government Briefs

August 8, 1988

Ever since President Reagan took office, the NIH budget has been a political football—artificially low requests handed off by the president have crossed the goal line as sizable increases in the final appropriations measure passed by Congress. But that tradition could end this year. The Reagan request for a small 6.8% increase over this year’s budget is being taken seriously on Capitol Hill, and it appears likely that the final figures for NIH will be only slightly higher. In June,

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Hot Papers

August 8, 1988

The articles listed below—all less than a year old—have received a substantially greater number of citations than others of the same type and vintage. A citation-tracking algorithm of the Institute for Scientific Information has identified these articles. A. Dorn, J. Bollekens, A. Staub, C. Benoist, D. Mathis, “A multiplicity of CCAAT box-binding proteins,” Cell, 50 (6), 863-72, 11 September 1987. T. Hunter, “A thousand and one protein kinases,” Cell, 50

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{WantNoCacheVal} Imreg Rushes To Gain Approval Each day, more than a dozen clerks rustle through stacks of patient records as they photocopy, compile, and review an estimated 28,000 documents. The documents record data from clinical testing of what could, if approved by the FDA, be a new treatment for AIDS patients. The clerks are part of a small, highly motivated team employed by Imreg Inc., New Orleans. The tiny company is heatedly engaged in filing a new drug application for its promising I

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Industry Briefs

August 8, 1988

California, home to almost one-third of the nation’s biotech firms, is eager for more. The state’s universities and venture capitalists have proven successful at nourishing nascent companies; now its Department of Commerce is joining the effort. Its advertising slogan, placed this spring in four magazines for scientists, urges: “Come to California and bring your genes.” But it isn’t all slick public relations—the agency also offers a free, 200-page report p

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Letters

August 8, 1988

"Soviets Research Animals," by THOMAS J. NOVITSKY "‘No’ to Recantation," by MICHAEL STUART LOOP "Quackbusting Tales," by FREDERICK I. SCOTT JR. "Solar Booster," by A. CENGIZ BÜKER, M.C. "Islam Not Better?," by R. BHAWANI PRASAD In the spirit of glasnost, I would like to correct the statement attributed to me in the article “Perestroika Comes None Too Soon” (The Scientist, June 27, 1988, page 6), implying a universal lack of pyrogen testing (other than human

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More Work On Pollution's Impact, For Plants' Sake

By | August 8, 1988

Atmospheric emissions from human activity have long been known to be a health hazard. Short chimneys and, later, tall smokestacks have dispersed emissions across our landscapes in ever-widening spheres of influence, to the point where anthropogenic air pollutants today cover broad regions in developing and developed countries across the globe. Scientific study of the impact of these emissions on plants has extended beyond the dramatic local-point source problem to current major programs’

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National Lab Briefs

August 8, 1988

Brookhaven National Lab’s High Flux Beam Reactor got a major boost last month when a Department of Energy committee recommended that a proposed $20 million upgrade of the reactor be included in next year’s budget. A DOE official says that the project “has a good shot” of making it into the president’s 1990 budget request, which will be submitted next January. The upgrade will allow the 23-year-old reactor to remain the nation’s primary neutron source for th

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NIH Peers At Its Own Peer-Review Process

By | August 8, 1988

At least six experiments are aimed at improving the odds for innovative, cross disciplinary, and high-risk proposals WASHINGTON—The National Institutes of Health is changing the way that it does business with the research community. More than a half-dozen experiments are underway to improve the peer-review system—the tool NIH uses to weed out nearly two-thirds of the proposals it examines from those it will find. Most researchers consider peer review to be a pillar of science, ran

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Private Institute Briefs

August 8, 1988

No one believes that science is always objective. But how much are the ideas, experiments, and even conclusions of science shaped by the surrounding culture? Social scientist Kalim Siddiqui, director of the Muslim Institute in London, wants to know. So he has invited Islamic scientists working outside the Muslim world— he estimates there are 500,000 of them—to attend a conference in London this winter to examine the question. Siddiquis own opinion is that modern science is ‘l

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