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Fast Censure for Glueck

By | August 10, 1987

WASHINGTON—The recent censure of Charles J. Glueck for misreporting his studies of children on low-cholesterol diets illustrates the biomedical community’s increasing concern about scientific misconduct, according to NIH Deputy Director William Raub. Glueck, who has received several NIH grants, was formally censured by the agency last month. It has recommended that Glueck be barred from receiving any federal funds for two years, and banned from serving on any government advisory g

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FEEDBACK

By | August 10, 1987

In his interview with THE SCIENTIST (June 1, 1987, p. 14), William R. Graham, the current White House science adviser, commenting on relations between the administration and the scientific community regarding SDI, said, “I think we need to have a more reasoned discourse on the subject and draw more on the industrial sector as well as the academic sector. I think that will help moderate some of the positions being taken, as we get more information injected into the process.” We woul

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Few Enlist in NATO Program Of Exchanges

By | August 10, 1987

ZURICH—The twin problems of transcending national boundaries and crossing over from academic to industrial labs appear to have doomed a NATO program meant to encourage international scientific exchanges. Begun in 1982, the $1 million program was designed to forge links between universities and industrial laboratories in different countries by using the same exchange mechanisms as those for basic science and inter-university cooperation. These include fellowships, collaborative research

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Field Testing Dispute Spreads to Europe

By | August 10, 1987

PARIS—Europeans this summer have gained intimate experience in an exercise they had viewed in the past as a strictly American sport: genetic engineers versus ecologists. The contest arose after a spate of reports revealed that field tests of modified bacteria and plants were under way in France, West Germany, Belgium and Britain. Ecologists quickly denounced the “arrogance” of the European Economic Community, which financed some of the experiments. Of particular concern is

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Forthcoming Books

August 10, 1987

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE Modern Biotechnology S B Penrose. Blackwell Scientific: September, 200 pp, $24.95. Provides detailed information on recombinant DNA technology, industrial microbiology, monoclonal antibodies, and plant and animal cell culture; includes a discussion of the legal, social and ethical issues surrounding biotechnology. EARTH SCIENCE Deformation of Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks (No. 28). M.E. Jones and R.M.F. Preston, eds. Blackwell Scientific: September, 360 pp, $90. Reports

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CAN’T AFFORD IT The proper priorities for NSF remain people, equipment and facilities, in that order. Thus, any new program must be viewed in the context of all established programs and evaluated in competition with other high-priority activities. To do otherwise does not accept the reality of the overall budget situation, and at the risk of compromising the standards of excellence we have worked so hard to maintain. Thus, while we support much of the intent and spirit of H.R. 1905, we m

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Happenings

August 10, 1987

Robert Hoffmann, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, has been named Assistant Secretary for Research, effective January 1, 1988. Prior to joining the Smithsonian staff, Hoffmann was Summerfield Distinguished Professor at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, and curator of mammals at the University of Kansas Museum of Natural History. As assistant secretary, Hoffmann will serve as the principal adviser to the secretary and undersecretary on the Smit

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Happy 100th Birthday, NIH

By | August 10, 1987

In 1887 the U.S. federal government established a little one-room laboratory on Staten Island, N.Y., and called it the Laboratory of Hygiene. Today, that lab is called the National Institutes of Health. All year long NIH has been bombarding the media with press releases on its centennial events, including a July 1 Capitol Hill “photo opportunity” with some of the nation’s 25,000 centenarians. But they’ve failed to mention many of the more interesting stories. For ex

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In 1954 Conway Zirkie reviewed the fascinating history of the patterns and context of citations to the falsified scientiflc experiments published by Vien- nese zoologist Paul Kammerer. Using two types of salamanders and the male of the midwife toad, Kammerer claimed in the 1920s to have shown that acquired characteristics were inherited. But, as Zirkle recounts, “the acquired chareacters... turned out to be india ink.” (Science Vol. 120, 1954. p. 189). The truth about Kammerer

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How to Study Arms Control

By | August 10, 1987

SAN FRANCISCO—Scientists have long been prominent in the debate on arms control and international security. Yet until recently, they had few mid-career opportunities to learn the technical and political issues that shape that debate. The 3-year-old science fellowship program at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Arms Control was created to meet that need. The program, which physicist/astronaut Sally K. Ride will join in October after she leaves NASA this

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