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Scientists may find this a better year than usual to get grants either from or through the National Science Foundation to do research in Japan, thanks to an infusion of funding support from the U.S. government and two Japanese organizations. The NSF’s U.S.-Japan Cooperative Science Program received $800,000 more than it did last year, doubling its budget, according to program manager Larry Weber. NSF will use the money for four programs. " Long-term Stays in Japan. U.S. scientists and

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(Ed. note: After a distinguished career devoted to plant biochemistry and the study of vitamin synthesis, Trevor Goodwin retired in 1983 as Johnston Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Liverpool. He was highly influential in shaping the course of British science, serving in such key science groups as the University Grants Committee and the Council of the Royal Society. He also authored widely used textbooks and recently completed a history of the U.K Biochemical Society. Here, Goodwi

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Open Software Or Open Warfare?

By | July 25, 1988

The baffling battle over Unix: Why would IBM team up with its arch rivals? Is its software consortium bluffing AT&T? Unix. After years of learning incompatible sets of commands and rewriting programs for each new computer, scientists thought they saw relief on the way. Computer workstations of all stripes run Unix. Cray-2 supercomputers run Unix. Even Apple Computer has introduced a version of the AT&T Bell Labs-developed system for its Macintosh II. Hosanna? Not yet. In the middie of May, s

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In a break with tradition, Balliol College, one of Oxford University’s 35 colleges, has named Baruch S. Blumberg of Philadelphia, Pa., as its next Master. Nobel prizewinner Blumberg is both the first United States citizen and the first scientist elected to head the college, which traditionally chooses scholars from the humanities. Succeeding medieval philosopher Anthony Kenny, Blumberg, vice president of population oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, will assume the mastership in Sept

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Private Institute Briefs

July 25, 1988

It’s not often that spiders are a gift of fellowship. It’s perhaps even less often that they are received with enthusiasm. Yet the unlikely occurred in May when the Smithsonian Institution and the Republic of Madagascar signed a protocol to strengthen cooperation in natural science and conservation. The protocol is another step in Madagascar’s recognition of its large number of unique species and habitats. In honor of the new alliance, Madame Lala Rakotovao, director of the C

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Product Options Increase In DNA Sequencing Arena

By | July 25, 1988

DNA sequence analysis is one of the pivotal methods of modern molecular biology. It plays a central role in virtually every project that involves the cloning, characterization, and manipulation of RNA or DNA. Since the development of rapid sequencing techniques in the early 1970s, more than 20 million bases have been sequenced by manual techniques. This DNA sequencing has all been accomplished with either of two techniques: the enzymatic method of sequencing, developed by Sanger and Coulson,

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How three Harvard grads formed an aerospace startup in a bedroom and six years later control a $45 million company FAIRFAX, VA.—David Thompson, Bruce Ferguson, and Scott Webster have boarded a rocket to success. The three young founders of Orbital’ Sciences Corp.—none older than 36—have created an aerospace firm that is playing David to the Goliaths of the rocket industry. After just six years they already have one viable product—a system for launching satellite

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Science Grants

July 25, 1988

Below is a list of notable grants recently awarded in the sciences—large federal grants as well as awards of all sizes from private foundations. The Individual cited with each entry is the project’s principal investigator. BIOMEDICINE: New devices in international cardiology; $100,000 from Rich Foundation, Atlanta, Ga., to Emory University’s Dr. Andreas Grundawit Research Center, Atlanta; G. Rueben The Lucille P Markey Charitable Trust, Miami, Fla., awarded the following fou

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Setting A Science Agenda For The Presidential Candidates

By | July 25, 1988

Are science and technology being shortchanged in the current presidential race? So far, the campaign has focused on past policies and mistakes, not future directions. The talk about tomorrow has been nothing more than stirring rhetoric about making the United States great again, bringing it back, and other equally vague promises. Missing is any specific debate about science and technology (see The Scientist, June 27, 1988, page 1). Both George Bush and Michael Dukakis are “for” t

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NEUROCOMPUTING: Foundations Of Research James A. Anderson and Edward Rosenfeld, editors MIT Press; Cambridge; 729 pages; $55 Brain science, neural computation and traditional artificial intelligence, perhaps more than most fields, seem to lack definitive textbooks. Instead they give rise to classic papers or multiauthored compendia such as this volume, which fits in squarely with other such important multiauthored landmark works as Principles of Neural Science, Handbook of Artificial Intelli

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