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By | September 5, 1988

One of your special features in The Scientist of July25 entitled “Good Scientists, Bad Science?” (page 1) has touched me such that I must respond. Granted there are scientists who give dissent a bad name, but that category would in my opinion include only those who falsify data in order to push an opposing hypothesis. These people should be made to feel the discontent of the scientific society to the fullest, but both cases cited in your articles seem not to fall into that cate

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

More Anonymity Perhaps we need more anonymity instead of less (The Scientist, July 11, page 5), in the prepublication review process. Why should the reviewer know the name of the author? It is hard to see how this knowledge makes the process more fair, and it certainly may make it lesefair. ALICE M. BRUES Emeritus Professor Department of Anthropology University of Colorado Boulder, Co. 80309-0233

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Letters

By | September 5, 1988

I have been receiving your publication for several weeks and am writing to let you know that I find The Scientist to be informative and interesting. It widens the tunnel vision one gets from concentrating on one field. CYNTHIA A. PRICE Genetic Diagnostics Corp. 160 Community Drive Great Neck, N.Y 11021

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Nobelist Sam Ting says his CERN experiment is like the United Nations—‘except we get something done.’ Here’s why GENEVA--"I don’t know what your rules are,” the particle physicist Sam Ting tells. the officials from the Soviet Union as they drink coffee in his Geneva office. “I don’t even care. What I am saying is this: When the announcement of a discovery is made, the people on the podium are the people who get the. credit. If you want your sci

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National Lab Briefs

September 5, 1988

A flap over photographs has made the Applied Physics Lab at Johns Hopkins University the target of a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. The suit charges that staff photographer Terry Corbett was illegally fired in August 1987 after he refused to take pictures of demonstrators protesting the lab’s work on nuclear weapons. ACLU lawyer Charles Becker contends that the rights of demonstrators were violated when the Defense Department-funded lab gave pictures of the demonst

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New Chemistry Periodical Is Publishing On Diskette

By | September 5, 1988

Volume one, number one, of the first scientific journal to be simultaneously published in hard copy and on computer diskette has been released by Tetrahedron Publications, a division of Pergamon Press. Called Tetrahedron Computer Methodology—or TCM— and touting itself as “the international electronic journal for rapid publication of original research in computer chemistry,” the new publication also is the first chemical journal to offer scientific research reports that

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NEW PRODUCTS

September 5, 1988

SYRINGELESS FILTERS Suitable for filtration of tissue culture media and laboratory buffers, Autovial syringeless filters are available to biological researchers in a .2 um pore size in both sterile and nonsterile forms. The devices consist of a prefilter, a membrane filter, and a syringe in one disposable unit. Membrane options include PVDF, Nylon66, or PTFE. Each ifitration unit can filter as much as 12 ml of sample. Prices depend on the quantity purchased and range from $1.10 to $2.10 per n

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New Rule Hikes Pay Of Some NSF Scientists

By | September 5, 1988

WASHINGTON—Starting next month, NSF will be allowed to pay up to $95,000 to scientists accepting temporary positions in Washington. The new rule represents a boost of $17,500 in the federal pay ceiling created last December by Congress. But the higher cap comes at a price—a new ceiling on salaries for thousands of NSF grantees. That annual ceiling has also been set at $95,000, although typically NSF funds only the summer salaries of university scientists. The ceiling will be appl

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Physics Dream Machine Is Imperiled

By | September 5, 1988

Technical problems plague Stanford’s Linear Collider, threatening its ability to produce breakthroughs in particle physics Expectations were running high. For months, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), an innovative particle accelerator nearing completion at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Facility (SLAC) in Palo Alto, Calif. had been preparing for its debut. This was the machine that would mint a million Z0 particles a year. Close study of the Z0—it’s mass, for example̵

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“Man’s moral sense has not kept pace with his scientific knowledge.” “Humans have discovered secrets hitherto kept hidden, but not learned to use them well.” In the early 1950s, it was good sport for cliché collectors to count the number of times a week they heard assertions of this sort. The threatening science was nuclear physics, and the shock of Hiroshima was still producing understandable moral queasiness. What we now call life sciences were thought

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