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Dinosaur Artists: Exhibiting a New Science?

By | September 7, 1987

DINOSAURS, MAMMOTHS AND CAVEMEN The Art of Charles R. Knight. Sylvia Czerkas, curator. Exhibit at Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, June-August 1987. DINOSAURS, PAST AND PRESENT Sylvia Czerkas, curator. Exhibit at Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, June-August 1987. What impact has dinosaur art had on the public’s understanding of dinosaurs? Scientists have been aware of remains of gi

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English Spoken Here

By | September 7, 1987

English has very nearly become the universal language of science. Whether for publication or for international conferences and symposia, English now dominates scientific communication. By what degree is apparent from the contents of the journals indexed in ISI’s Science Citation Index. This group of journals, selected by both peer judgment and the citation patterns of the world’s scientists, represents the most important portion of the scientific literature. Although this is only a

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Europeans Seek Academy Of Science

By | September 7, 1987

LONDON—An international group of eminent scientists hopes to establish a European Academy of Science to provide a new voice for researchers. Sir Arnold Burgen, a biologist and former foreign secretary of the Royal Society has taken the lead in convening an ad hoc group with representatives from seven European nations to discuss the academy. Its proposal received a favorable reception this summer at the European Science Foundation’s council meeting in Bonn. The Royal Society has ag

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Evolution At the Molecular Level

By | September 7, 1987

MOLECULAR EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS Masatoshi Nei. Columbia University Press, New York, 1987. 512 pp. $50. Recent developments in molecular biology mean that now it is possible to decipher genetic messages of parts of the genome from almost any organism. In the past, molecular biologists tended to assume that determination of the sequence of a single copy of a given gene for a given species provided sufficient information to speak meaningfully about the DNA sequence of the gene. Now there is inc

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FCC Makes On-line Ties More Costly

By | September 7, 1987

SAN FRANCISCO—A battle is brewing over a Federal Communications Commission proposal that could double the cost of accessing many on-line computer networks. Users affected by the proposal include the thousands of research labs across the nation that regularly use on-line computer services to keep them up-to-date on specific topics or to assist otherwise in their work. The change could force such labs to severely curtail or drop their use of such services. At issue is the right of so-ca

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Forthcoming Books

September 7, 1987

Developmental Time, Cultural Space: Studies In Psychogeography. Howard F. Stein. University of Oklahoma Press: September 18,252 pp, $21.95. Explores the human tendency to project internal issues onto the natural and social environment. Discusses this both through observations of migrants’ responses to new life in America and intergroup conflicts between Russia and Western Europe and the U.S. PHYSICS Energy In Physics, War and Peace. Hans Mark and Lowell Wood, eds. Balaban: September, 40

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Germans Redefine the Ranks

September 7, 1987

WEST BERLIN—A rose isa rose is a rose, according to Gertrude Stein. But a professor is not a Professor an einer Kunsthochschule (college of art), much less a Universitätsprofessor. So says the West German Bundestag, which voted to end rampant rank inflation in academic circles. A suit by hundreds of university professors forced the legislature to reestablish the hierarchical structure of academics that had eroded over the past two decades. The new law has no effect on salaries. &

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Happenings

September 7, 1987

Howard E. Morgan became the new president of the American Heart Association on June 22. M(frgan will continue at the Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, in his capacity as director of the Siegfried and Janet Weis Center for Research, as well as continuing to direct the development of a new program of basic investigation into cardiovascular disease. Peter Bond became the new Chairman of the Physics Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory in July. Bond sees relativistic heavy ion physics as th

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Is Quality a Casualty in the Race to Publish?

By | September 7, 1987

WASHINGTON—Last spring’s newspaper stories that described how IBM researchers had boosted the critical current density of a superconductive thin-film crystal by a factor of 100 were also bringing news of the discovery to most scientists. Not until six weeks later were the details published in Physical Review Letters. Increasingly, scientists in fast-paced fields are announcing breakthroughs at meetings or press conferences. Long before results appear in scientific journals, they

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Italy Expands Science Post

September 7, 1987

MILAN—In a surprise move never mentioned during Italy’s recent general election campaign, the new government is transferring supervision of the nation’s universities from the Ministry of Education to the Ministry of Scientific Research. The science ministry is also being elevated to cabinet level. The jurisdictional transfer of the university system, which comprises 50,000 people and has an annual budget of several billion dollars, may offer new opportunities for university

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