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DOS Utilities For Your PC

By | March 21, 1988

Editor’s note: This is the second article in a three-part series on utilities for IBM PCs or compatibles. For the first part, on enhancing input/output operations, see February 8, 1988, p. 22. A future article will deal with desktop utilities. The disk operating system (DOS) that you purchase to run on your personal computer consists primarily of a set of routines that application programs can call upon, together with a facility for loading programs. The various built-in commands like &

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Face To Face

By | March 21, 1988

As editor of the New England Journal of Medicine for more than a decade, Arnold S. Relman has played a significant role in setting publication standards for scientific journals. He champions the “Ingelfinger rule”promulgated by his predecessor, Franz Ingelfinger, which bars contributors from publicizing their articles before publication in the Journal. He also has strongly supported embargoes that permit reporters to receive advance copies of scientific journals on condition that th

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Forthcoming Books

March 21, 1988

This list of forthcoming books has been compiled from the latest information available from publishers. Dates of publication, prices and numbers of pages are tentative, however, and are subject to change. Soil Science Simplified. Second Edition. Mio I. Harpstead, Francis D. Hole and William Bennett. Iowa State University Press: April, $16.95, 204 pp. Explains the basic concepts of soil science including the physical, chemical and biological features, as well as soil management, classification

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Funding Cuts in Denmark Threaten Bohr Institute

By | March 21, 1988

COPENHAGEN—Government cut-backs have jeopardized the survival of one of Europe’s oldest and most prestigious research centers. The Niels Bohr Institute, named in honor of the Danish pioneer of quantum theory, “will die out totally if we continue to lose permanent positions at the present rate,” said its director, Knud Hansen. “We simply cannot finance research posts for new, young scientists to replace those who are leaving through retirement and to take jobs ov

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Genes and Judges; A Growing 'Courtship'

By | March 21, 1988

COURTS Henry M. Butzel. The Edwin Mellon Press, Lewiston, NY, 1987.801 pp. $89.95. Knowledge about genetics is accumulating so rapidly that it is not surprising that our court system does not keep pace. In this book, Henry M. Butzel illustrates convincingly the wide gap between the use and misuse of genetic technology and jurisprudential decision making. Butzel covers many disparate areas of genetics—ranging from patenting recombinant microorganisms to the genetic effects of radiati

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Happenings

March 21, 1988

Brian Wilkinson, professor of civil engineering and deputy dean of the Royal Military College of Science at Shrivenham, U.K., has been appointed director of the Natural Environment Research Council’s Institute of Hydrology and head of NERC's Wallingford Laboratory, effective July 5. Wilkinson spent nine years with the Water Research Center as head of the water resources division and head of the communications group. To 18 Individuals. The National Academy of Sciences will present t

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How I Work as Poet and Scientist

By | March 21, 1988

How I Work as Poet and Scientist Author:RONALD HOFFMANN Date: March 21, 1988 I begin with a vision of unity of creative work in science and in the humanities and arts. The shared ground is clear: both involve acts of creation, accomplished through craftsmanship, with an attention to detail. Both science and art value the true economy of statement. They share a desire to communicate, although that often gets obscured by jargon and by the deadening ritual of the research report in science, by too

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Laying Geology's Groundwork

By | March 21, 1988

TO GEOLOGY The Foundations of a Science, 1650-1830. Rachel Laudan. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987. 278 pp. $27.50. BY JERE H. LIPPS A disparity exists in geology between causal and historical practitioners of the science. Perhaps most geologists aim to decipher the Earth’s history, but an ever-larger number is concerned with the causes of geological phenomena, making them more akin to physicists and chemists than to the British founding geologists typically held in suc

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Letters

By | March 21, 1988

Room for Religion? On the Fast Track Animal Rights M.D.s in the Lab Date: March 21, 1988 The article Salam on Science and World Development” and its accompanying sidebar on science and religion (February 8, 1988, p. 20) struck me as being perfectly reasonable: an outstanding scientist, his belief in the supernatural, and his integration of Islam and physics. However, such an article today about a scientist who is a Christian would probably never appear in THE SCIENTIST, or if i

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N.C. Academy Finds A Policy Niche

By | March 21, 1988

BOSTON—State science academies, which traditionally ply the backwaters of the scientific world, can actually play vital roles in public debates that involve science and technology, according to an environmental policy specialist. The North Carolina Academy of Sciences (NCAS) has shown the way by playing an active role in setting standards for hazardous waste landfills and designing a state regulatory approach to toxic air pollutants, reported Richard N.L. Andrews, director of the Univ

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