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ASIS Marks 50 Years Spreading Information

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—As it starts a year-long celebration of its 50th birthday with a gala annual meeting in Boston this week, the American Society for Information Science faces a couple of paradoxes that together constitute an identity crisis. While the information industry is growing rapidly, the membership of ASIS is not. The society’s diversity, attested to by a membership drawn from a wide swath of academia, industry and government, has the disadvantage of diffusing its professional

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Citizens GroupsTarget New Campus Facilities

By | October 5, 1987

SAN FRANCISCO—Animal rights and environmental groups have targeted several proposed research facilities here in what univer- sity officials see as a serious threat to basic research and academic freedom on their campuses. Although there is a nationwide pattern of activity by various groups (see related story on p. 5), the Bay area has emerged as a major hot spot. At present Stanford University, University of California-Berkeley and UC-San Francisco are all fighting for permission to ex

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City Debates Animal Research Plan

By | October 5, 1987

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.—City officials here are wrestling with a proposal to place experiments involving animals under the control of a new council-appointed body that would have the right to delay or veto any work it did not like. The city council is in the midst of hearings leading to a possible vote on two ordinances relating to animal research at Harvard University, MIT and other private institutions within the city limits. The first proposal would seek to ensure that all laboratories are

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Drug Companies Must Adapt to the 'Bioburst' Era

By | October 5, 1987

“Bioburst” as the name Richard Noel Re gives to the revolution now taking place in molecular biology. In his book Bioburst: The Impact of Modern Biology on the Affairs of Man (Louisiana State University Press, 1986), Re discusses how that revolution will permeate contemporary life. He uses the discovery of cyclosporin A to illustrate the new flexibility needed in the pharmaceutical industry to deal with this revolution. The excerpt below is taken from the book. Chance favors the

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EDINBURGH—Already renowned for its summer arts festival, the Scottish capital is preparing for an annual international science festival each spring. Organizers have already obtained a pledge of $120,000 from the town council, and hope to raise an additional $750,000 in each of the first three years of the festival. They plan a group of smaller events next year before kicking off the festival in 1989. The festival is expected to attract both scientists and the public. If a success, it

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Forthcoming Books

October 5, 1987

AGRICULTURE The Transformation of International Agricultural Research and Development. J. Lin Compton, ed. Westview: October, 260 pp, $19.85. Assesses the influence of experiment stations on agricultural research and development and the effectiveness of their research. Includes discussions of the role of women in research and development, the role of research and extension services and the linking of traditional and modern agricultural knowledge. ANTHROPOLOGY Almost Human: A Journey Into th

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German Physicist Forms Group on Global Problems

By | October 5, 1987

WEST BERLIN—A West German physicist has begun a new effort to mobilize scientific and technical resources against some of the world’s most pressing problems. The idea of creating a Global Challenges Network is a “crazy vision,” admitted Hans-Peter Dürr, professor of physics and director of the Werner Heisenberg Institute of Physics at the Max Planck Society in Munich. But he said that the magnitude of the problem requires a worldwide effort involving the most ta

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Goldberger On Education And Arms Control

By | October 5, 1987

Q: How healthy is U.S. science? GOLDBEGER: I think U.S. science is quite healthy in most of the forefront areas. In biology, it seems to be extremely strong. In condensed matter physics and related device physics, it’s very strong. In astronomy, astrophysics, there’s little question that the United States is the unchallenged world leader. In elementary particle physics and high energy physics, we have sort of a bifurcated situation. On the theoretical side, the United States is pro

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Happenings

October 5, 1987

The Association of American Medical Colleges has appointed two new executives to its Washington branch. Robert I. Levy, senior associate vice president for health sciences at Columbia University, will become vice president for biomedical research January 1, 1988, and Edwin I. Crocker, vice president for finance and treasurer of the AAMC in Mills College, Oakland, Calif., will become vice president for administrative services on November 16. Levy has served as dean of the medical school and vice

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Interviewing for Scientific Jobs

By | October 5, 1987

Too often “technical” people fare poorly in a job interview because they have a faulty perception of what is expected of them. They believe that having strong technical credentials is the primary factor utilized in filling a job. In fact, technical credentials represent only one of several criteria an interviewer considers. The very fact that you have been invited for an interview is a good indication that the employer is satisfied you meet the technical requirements for the positi

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