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Interviewing for Scientific Jobs

By | October 5, 1987

Too often “technical” people fare poorly in a job interview because they have a faulty perception of what is expected of them. They believe that having strong technical credentials is the primary factor utilized in filling a job. In fact, technical credentials represent only one of several criteria an interviewer considers. The very fact that you have been invited for an interview is a good indication that the employer is satisfied you meet the technical requirements for the positi

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Lasers Take Their Place in the Lab

By | October 5, 1987

RESEARCH APPLICATIONS OF LASERS Science. August 7, 1987. Vol. 237. Pages 605-625. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC. While laser scientists are busy worrying about femtosecond pulses, squeezed states and free electrons, lasers developed in the 1960s and ‘70s are finding their place in the research laboratory. Three scientific disciplines—geophysics, atomic physics and chemical physics—are highlighted in the August 7, 1987 issue of Science a

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Lessons From the Pasteur Institute Cancers

By | October 5, 1987

The Pasteur Institute is world famous for the science it has produced for the past century, particularly in molecular biology. But for the past year and a half, molecular biologists have been concerned about another institute matter: six of its molecular biologists working with the teclmiques of genetic engineering have developed cancer. What do these cancers mean? Do they show that genetic engineering is hazardous for workers, as has been suggested by its critics from the beginning? Or is

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Letters

By | October 5, 1987

As a disenfranchised victim of the peer-review system, I consider that the myriad proposals for modifying peer review are less than encouraging. In his letter “Can Peer Review Be Improved?” (May 4, 1987, P. 10), Moshe Wolman is more than correct when he points out the inhibitory effect peer review has on science. Innovative, creative ideas that depart from dogma are usually given unfundable priorities, especially when dealing with NIH. In 1985 NIH received more than 30,000 proposa

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Misconduct Plan Due?

By | October 5, 1987

HEDGESVILLE, W.VA.—Guidelines for coping with scientific fraud and misconduct may be drafted by a joint committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Bar Association. Draft guidelines could be prepared and discussed at the group’s next meeting in the spring of 1988, according to Albert H. Teich of the AAAS. Teich is project director of the subcommittee on scientific fraud and misconduct of the AAAS/ABA National Conference of Lawyers and Sc

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Missed Chances on a Hopeful Road

By | October 5, 1987

Looking back, my scientific career seems to have been liberally strewn with missed opportunities. In fact, right at its outset I missed an opportunity by force of circumstance. After a six-year break in my studies occasioned by service with the Jewish Brigade in the 8th Army during World War II, I began work on my Ph.D. thesis at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1947. The subject was a search for soil bacteria that would produce an antibiotic against typhoid and dysentery bacteria. At th

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NIH Asks AIDS Labs to Tighten Safety

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—Federal biosafety guidelines for laboratories handling the AIDS virus are appropriate, a team of virus safety experts has concluded after investigating labs working with large amounts of highly concentrated AIDS virus. But workers need to better understand how and why the practices should be followed. The four-member group, formed last month after NIH announced that an unidentified lab worker was infected while working with the virus, spent two weeks at the dozen or so NIH

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NIH Probing Use of Fetal Tissue

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—NIH is looking into charges that it has improperly funded research on tissues and organs that have been removed from live human fetuses. The investigation stems from allegations by Jeremy Rifkin of the Foundation on Economic Trends, that the National Disease Research Interchange (NDRI) is not following appropriate protocols to establish death before obtaining the tissue and providing it to researchers. F. William Dommel, of NIH’s Office of Protection from Research Risk

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NSF Expands Program Of Instrument Grants

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—A small but popular NSF program to provide scientific instruments for undergraduate programs is being expanded to let in both two-year colleges and major research universities. The changes reflect pent-up demand within higher education for such teaching equipment and a feeling here that the federal government must do more to support the next generation of scientists and engineers. But the expansion may dilute the program’s value for its original audience. The College

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NSF Urged to Boost K-12 Effort

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—A $1.6 million study by an independent research firm is likely to provide ammunition for members of Congress who want the National Science Foundation to become more involved in pre-college science education. The study by SRI International of Palo Alto, Calif., requested in 1985 by Congress, was released during the August congressional recess. But it is likely to be “chewed over” next year, according to Thomas Van der Voort, staff director of the Senate Appropriat

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