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Buck Trust to Finance Aging Center

By | October 19, 1987

SAN FRANCISCO—A California court has awarded a $65 million en- dowment from the Buck Trust to begin a multidisciplinary research institute on aging. The Buck Center on Aging, to be built in Main County, will be affiliated with the Berkeley, San Francisco and Davis campuses of the University of California system. The center expects to open in 1992 with a research staff of 60, including 15 senior researchers, and an annual operating budget of $4.5 million. The staff is expected to grow to

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Congress Asked To Amend Act on Orphan Drugs

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—The Orphan Drug Act, passed in 1983, has been effective in bringing to market new drugs tsrgeted at rare diseases, but more research funds are needed to complete the task and expand it to cover medical foods and devices, federal lawmakers were told this month. In testimony before a House subcommittee on health and the environment, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Frank Young reported that nearly 160 drugs have been designated as orphans, of which 18 have been approv

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D Projects Unblocked

By | October 19, 1987

DUBLIN—The European Commission is expected to agree later this fall to divert at least $462 million over the next five years from the EEC’s Regional Fund into helping the science infrastructure of its less favored regions. The proposal is based on work done for the EEC by Ireland’s science agency, the National Board for Science and Technology. The NBST was hired in 1985 to determine how Regional Fund monies— traditionally used for road, sewer and drainage projects&#

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Defense Labs Yield Ideas For U.K. Firms

By | October 19, 1987

LONDON—Britain is using “ferrets” to transfer technology from its national defense research laboratories into the civil sector. These two-legged ferrets, all of whom have good technical qualifications, are employed by a technology broker to spot promising ideas and obtain licenses for them. The broker is a private company called Defence Technology Enterprises based at Milton Keynes. Owned by eight British financial institutions, it so far has signed up more than 200 associa

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Detecting Radar's Development

By | October 19, 1987

RADAR IN WORLD WAR II Vol. I and II Henry E. Guerlac. Tomash/American Institute of Physics, New York, 1987.1,255 pp. $110. The American Institute of Physics and Tomash Publishers have performed a great service by publishing, after 40 years, Henry Guerlac’s outstanding history of the development of microwave radar in World War II. Until now, this unique document has been available only on the shelves of a few libraries as a collection of loose pages. Its intended publication after the war

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ESF's Seibold On Forging Links For European Science

By | October 19, 1987

When Eugene Seibold —German marine geologist, doyen of European science policy and president of the European Science Foundation (ESF)—f aces the problems of organizing international collaboration on the linguistically and culturally divided European continent, he says he is a realist. In Europe, where it’s unheard of for a French academic, for example, to be given a professorship in a German university, any real integration is unlikely “for another 200 years.” Seib

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Ethiopia to Form Science Center

By | October 19, 1987

ADDIS ABABA—Ethtiopia’s military government is moving rapidly to create a National Science Center to force the pace of technical change in one of the world’s poorest countries. The center is an outgrowth of the increased support for science expressed in the country’s new constitution, approved in May and put into effect last month. The idea for a center comes largely from Abebe Muluneh a civil engineer in his late 40s who heads the country’s Science and Technolog

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Fear of Suits Blocks Retractions

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—The fear of lawsuits is blocking efforts to purge the scientific literature of articles by psychologist Stephen Breuning that are based on fraudulent data. The National Institute of Mental Health concluded this spring that Breuning “knowingly, willfully and repeatedly engaged in misleading and deceptive practices in reporting results of research.” Although all journal editors who published Breuning’s questionable papers were sent copies of the NIMH report, on

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Forget Affirmative Action. Think National Survival

By | October 19, 1987

American women have made remarkable inroads into the community of scientists, particularly over the past decade and a half, but the increase in their participation has stopped well short of equality with men either in numbers or in opportunities. Although the problems women continue to encounter are formidable, the nation’s need for them is growing, and change in their status appears inevitable. With rare exceptions, American women are relative latecomers to science. Their representatio

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Forthcoming Books

October 19, 1987

Darkness at Night: A Riddle of the Universe. Edward Harrison. Harvard University Press: October 30, 264 pp, $25. Explores the phenomenon of darkness in the night sky by tracing answers and theories that in the past have proven wrong, looking at the structure and age of the universe, and examining the nature of light. BIOCHEMISTRY General Principles of BIochemistry of the Elements. Volume 7. Eilchiro Ochiai. Plenum Publishing: October, 450 pp, $79.50. Discusses global aspects of the biochemis

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