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Sound Strategy for Competitive Cooperation

By | November 2, 1987

STRENGTHENING U.S. ENGINEERING THROUGH INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION Some Recommendations for Action. Committee on International Cooperation in Engineenng, National Academy of Engineering and Office of International Affairs, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 1987. 68 pp. In the earliest days of the American republic there were practically no home-bred engineers. As George Washington wrote in a letter to John Randolph, anyone wishing to dig a canal or build a bridge was obliged to R

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States Launch Lobbying Blitz For SSC Site

By | November 2, 1987

WASHINGTON—Ohio State University physicist William Palmer says he felt like “eollapsing in the corner” after working long hours to help his state complete its proposal for the Superconducting Supercollider. But the september 2 filing deadline was just the beginning of the race for the multi-billion-dollar high-energy physics project. Officials from Ohio and 24 other states barely had time to catch their breath before plunging ahead into the next phase of the campaign, which

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The SDI 'Quick Fix' Is Fading Fast

By | November 2, 1987

Now, more than four years after President Reagan challenged American scientists “to give us the means of rendering.. nuclear weapons obsolete,” the technological optimism and political currency behind his Strategic Defense Initiative have peaked. Fair-minded studies by respected scientific experts provide sobering evidence that SDI’s reach exceeds its grasp. Many members of Congress are aware of SDI’s declining technical credibility, -increasingly unwilling to support

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Third World Scientists Pledge Cooperation

By | November 2, 1987

BEIJING—Impressed by China’s example, more than 100 scientists from Asia, Africa and Latin America have resolved to improve scientific and technical cooperation within and between their countries. But the September meeting here adjourned with no consensus on specific proposals. “The secret of success is self-reliance plus a collective spirit, which I define as cooperation and coordination,” Lu Jiaxi, executive president of the Chinese Academy of Science, told delegate

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Tools for Science

November 2, 1987

Physics National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The world’s brightest source of X-ray and UV radiation, for basic and applied studies in condensed matter, surface studies, photochemistry and photophysics, lithography, crystallography, small-angle scattering and X-ray microscopy. Contact Roger Klaffky, National Synchrotron Light Source. Telephone: (516) 2824974. High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). For the study of fundamental problems in solid state and nuclear physics and in structural b

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U.S. Doesn't Know Beans About Genes

By | November 2, 1987

WASHINGTON—Two recent public opinion surveys indicate that a substantial majority of adult Americans do not know what genetic engineering is and are ignorant of the ethical and scientific issues surrounding it. Nearly two in five people (39 percent) had not heard of genetic engineering, according to a survey conducted last spring for Novo Laboratories, a pharmaceutical company. The poll also found that nearly two-thirds of the remaining group—representing a total of 80 percent o

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Where to Find Facilities for Physics Research

By | November 2, 1987

Some aspects of small physics research require the use of large so phisticated facilities not normally available in research laboratories such as synchrotron radiation and neutron sources, powerful electron microscopes and large reactors. A brief description of 23 national facilities for research related to the physics of condensed matter thai are available to qualified scientists from other laboratories is found in “National Facilities for Research in the Physics of Condensed Matter,

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Will the Viewing Audience Stay Tuned?

By | November 2, 1987

THE INFINITE VOYAGE “Unseen Worlds,” Part 1 of a 12-part, 3-year television series to be shown on PBS and selected commercial stations. Produced by WQED/ Pittsburgh in association with the National Academy of Sciences with funding from Digital Equipment Corp. The latest big, respectable, complicated television series about science is The Infinite Voyage. Its subtitle (and stated organizing principle) is “The Great Adventure of Scientific Exploration and Discovery.” B

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At a time when the nation is alarmed over the shortage of qualified science and mathematics teachers in public schools, the National Executive Service Corps (NESO) has discovered an untapped reserve: an ever-abundant supply of technical professionals nearing retirement who have expressed willingness to teach. Thousands of scientific and technically trained professionals annually reach retirement age, but it was not known to what extent they would be interested in teaching as a second career.

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58 Projects For Eureka

By | October 19, 1987

MADRID—Ministers from 19 European countries have agreed to fund 58 new projects as part of the ongoing Eureka program in advanced technologies. The latest grants, worth a total of 709 million ECU ($800 million), bring to 165 the number of research projects approved since the program was begun in 1985. Meeting here last month, the science ministers also agreed on the possibility of participation by countries from Eastern Europe and North America. The list of participants has grown beyon

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