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Filing by Modem

By | March 7, 1988

{WantNoCacheVal} Filing by Modem Clearly we are heading toward the day when you’ll be able to file your tax return with IRS Already this year there are pilot projects allowing large professional preparers to supply returns in this manner. It’s safe to predict that within about five years, you’ll be able to submit returns by modem if you have a program like one of those reviewed here. —B.S.

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Forums to Address Role of Editors

By | March 7, 1988

WASHINGTON-Scientists have begun to consider changes in fundamental publication and research practices in the wake of several well-publicized cases of research misconduct. Panel Backs Journal Retractions Medical journals should print retractions of questioned or fraudulent research even if the lead author or co-authors have not submitted or approved such statements said a top official of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. "Journal editors have a responsibility to keep

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Germans Fault Bigger Space Budget

By | March 7, 1988

WEST BERLIN—West German scientists appear to be increasingly unhappy with their government’s decision to boost spending on space research at the expense of fundamental science. The Fraunhofer Society for the Promotion of Applied Research, the principal state organization funding applied sciences, has come out against the 16 percent increase for space planned in the country’s 1988 R&D budget. It echoes earlier criticism from the Max Planck Society, which is devoted to basic

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Happenings

March 7, 1988

PEOPLE DEATHS AWARDS SCIENCE ARCHIVE Three MIT scientists, Robert Horvitz, Richard O. Hynes and Susumu Tonegawa, have been appointed Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators as part of a new long-term collaborative agreement to conduct biomedical research at MIT. HHMI will help fund the research and will donate $15 million toward the construction of a new MIT research facility. Caroline L. Herzenberg, Argonne National Laboratory, became president of the national Association fo

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Journals Slow to Retract Slutsky Research Errors

By | March 7, 1988

SAN DIEGO-Three U.S. journals still have not published retractions or clarifications on nine articles by Robert A. Slutsky that 18 months ago were declared fraudulent or questionable. One small journal is waiting for its publishing house to obtain permission from Slutsky. A second publication has withdrawn only research retracted by Slutsky himself. The third journal has printed no corrections because neither Slutsky nor his co-authors have requested retractions. All said they feared litigat

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Letters

By | March 7, 1988

Euro-Science News Lab Break-Ins Gene Sequencing IEEE’s Voting Rules Bernard Dixon’s short Opinion piece “Why Does the U.S. Neglect Euro-Science” (January 25, 1988, p. 11) on the asymmetry between U.S. and European mass media coverage of science neglects one of the made by Harrois-Monin in her original article. That point is that the proportionate coverage of European science by U.S. periodicals is a matter of editorial policy and practice. American journalist

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Luck in the Lab Helped My Career

By | March 7, 1988

My scientific career has been helped along by two marvelous instances of good luck. The first occurred while I was a research student in chemistry at Leeds University where my supervisor was Prof. R. Whytlaw-Gray, the leader of a distinguished school for the measurement of atomic weights. His method depended on the use of a very delicate microbalance to determine the vapor densities of substances in their dilute gaseous states. The problem he gave me was to obtain a new and more precise va

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Mr. President, What About...?

By | March 7, 1988

Boston-Scientists who advise the president face a dilemma. Their advice must remain confidential if it is to be useful. Yet their authority ultimately is derived from public acceptance of their technical expertise. Last month, at the annual meeting here of the Amencan Association for the Advancement of Science, a distinguished panel of past and present science advisers discussed how best to advise the president. Although the day-long symposium was spawned by the frustration and disappointment

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Editor’s note: February was a key month for the proposed project to map and sequence the human genome. The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences issued its report “Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome,” which sounds a strong call for an immediate, largescale program. Meanwhile, David Baltimorebiologist, devoted part of his keynote address at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to a cautionary note regarding t

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NASA Pushes Two New Programs

By | March 7, 1988

Overall research and development accounts for $4.4 billion of the NASA budget request, up 33 percent from this year’s $3.3 billion. The largest share is the $967 million sought for the space station, which received $392 million this year. Other features of the NASA budget request were an increase from $52 million to $84 million for NASA’s participation in the transatmospheric research for the hypersonic aerospace plane project, and a five-fold increase, from $20 million to $102 mil

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