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How I Learned the Fine Art of Collaboration

By | February 22, 1988

Collaboration “to work together, especially in a joint intellectual effort.” So says Mr. Webster. In practice, however, we all know that collaboration involves the art of getting credit for someone s work, an intellectual effort that can leap continents and disciplines in a single bound. I didn’t realize that during my first attempt at collaboration. Several years ago I spent some time using the Dodge procedure to produce ghosts from pig red blood cells. This entails lysing

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Letters

February 22, 1988

PETA Not Extremists UNESCO’S Vision A Friendlier TeX Elisabeth Carpenter’s informative article about animal liberation actions (December 14, 1987, P. 1) paints People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (rather typically I’m sorry to say) as an extremist group. Sadly, the major focus of our work seldom makes the papers or the six o’clock news. A mediawide tendency to link PETA with the Animal Liberation Front and similar groups is the result of PETA’s re

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Math Society Copes with Change at 100

By | February 22, 1988

BOSTON—For the 20,000 members of the American Mathematical Society, this year’s centennial is an occasion for both celebration and concern. American mathematics in many ways is at its zenith in terms of prestige and scope. Yet federal support for the “pure” mathematics represented by the AMS has failed to keep up with inflation, and there is little hope for a turnabout until the federal deficit is brought under control. There is turmoil as well inside the AMS. After a

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New Orleans Welcomes Pittcon

February 22, 1988

New Orleans Welcomes Pittcon Some 30,000 spectroscopists, analytical chemists and other interested scientists are gathering in New Orleans this week to attend Pittcon, the 39th annual Pittsburgh Conference & Exposition on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy. The five-day meeting, one of the longest on the U.S. convention calendar, will feature seminars and symposia on themes ranging from drug testing and cholesterol counts to scanning tunneling microscopes and artificial intelligenc

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New Products At Pittcon

February 22, 1988

Editor’s note: The following products will be featured at the 39th Annual Pittsburgh Conference & Exposition on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy February 22-26 at the New Orleans Convention Center. The conference is sponsored by The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh and The Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh. This 1988 Buyers Guide of specialty gases provides information on 59 pure gases and hydrocarbon liquids in up to seven purity grades, as well as more than

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Rx for M.D.-Researchers: Back to the Lab

By | February 22, 1988

Changing times have depleted the ranks of physicians who enter into careers as researchers. The shortage of physician-scientists has prompted the National Institutes of Health, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and similar organizations to offer fellowships and other incentives to entice graduated M.D.s into research careers. But these inducements may come too late in the education of a physician. Scientists often choose their careers because they were exposed at some point to a laboratory.

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So They Say

February 22, 1988

"Building More Barriers" "Sen. Rockefeller on Japan" "Space Flight's New Law," "NSF Director on Physics Funding," by Erich Bloch "A Time To Publish, A Time To Recant," by Alex Weisskopf "Political Promises," by Bob Davis "Getting the Best Science," by Anthony S. Fauci "Science's Stamp Collectors," by Luis Alvarez No doubt about it; science can be tough to put across, and the areas furthest from everyday experience are the toughest, so one might suppose scientists would be anxio

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Taking Philosophy a Bit Too Far

By | February 22, 1988

THE PROBABILISTIC REVOLUTION Vol. 1: Ideas in History. Lorenz Kruger, Lorraine J. Daston and Michael Heidelberger, eds. The MIT Press. Cambridge, MA, 1987. 472 pp. $32.50. Vol. 2: Ideas in the Sciences. Lorenz Kruger, Gerd Gigerenzer and Mary S. Morgan, eds. 480 pp. $32.50. ($60 lbr set.) Eight historians, six philosophers, five historians of science, four social scientists, three psychologists, three biologists, one mathmetician and one mathematical statistician gathered in the academic year

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The Paperless Analytical Lab

By | February 22, 1988

Today’s laboratories are besieged by demands for improved efficiency, increased productivity, improved data quality, immediate access to data and tighter cost control In addition, increasingly sophisticated laboratory instrumentation requires the day-to-day management of floods of analytical information. The traditional paper-intensive management systems found in today’s laboratories cannot address these demands or efficiently manage the volume of data produced. For today's analyti

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Things They Didn't Teach You, But Should Have

By | February 22, 1988

HOW TO DO IT Vol 1. British Medical Association, London, 1985. 266 pp. £6.95. Vol 2. British Medical Association, London, 1987. 208 pp. £6.95. Distributed in the U.S. by Taylor & Francis, Philadelphia. $14.95 each. How to search the literature, use a word processor, write for money and run a pressure group to change the law—these are just four of the punchy, practical articles in a series that is now appearing regularly in the British Medical Journal. Published in its entiret

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