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Graham's Appointees Mirror His Credentials

By | June 29, 1987

WASHINGTON—In eight months as presidential science adviser, William Graham has built a staff that has extensive defense and technical experience but few ties to the mainstream academic community. His latest appointment is the Department of Energy's Beverly Berger, who took over April 1 as assistant director for life sciences in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She replaces Robert Rabin, who returned to the National Science Foundation after 18 months at OSTP to coordinate

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WASHINGTON—Operating with plenty of optimism and a shoestring budget, the non-profit Americans for the Universality of UNESCO (AUU) is working to narrow the gap between the United States and the U.N. agency it abandoned in 1984. "Unfortunately," said William Treanor, who serves as the organization's Washington representative, "under [the Reagan] administration we're pretty much a candle in the hurricane." The group's newsletter, distributed to 1,200 Americans and more than 2,000 persons ab

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Happenings

June 29, 1987

Benoit de Crombrugghe, chief of the gene-regulation section at the National Cancer Institute, has been named chairman of the department of genetics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Thmor Institute. De Crombrugghe's research has focused on the analysis and understanding of hereditary cancer and cancer susceptibility. He has been with the National Cancer Institute since 1963. In addition to his appointment as chairman, de Crombrugghe has been named to the first Paul and Mary H

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HHMI: Bitterness Remains

By | June 29, 1987

WASHINGTON—Behind Donald Fredrickson's forced resignation June 2 as president and lifetime trustee of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute lies a tale of budget overruns and unorthodox purchasing procedures that HHMI trustees and officials say stem from his wife's active and inappropriate role at the institute. "It's big and it's bad," said HHMI chairman George Thorn about the results of the six-month review conducted by the New York law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, abo

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Japan, Stalled On Frontier Science Plan

By | June 29, 1987

Japan's effort to launch an international program in basic biological research has stalled again amid continued confusion over its specifics, according to U.S. and Japanese sources familiar with the project. The latest setback to the Human Frontier Science Program came earlier this month at the Venice economic summit, where Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone had been expected to unveil an official proposal. Instead, final details of the program remain under wraps, and the seven leaders of major in

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Kicking Joe McCarthy Out of the Lab

By | June 29, 1987

In April 1954, I was one of thousands of biomedical scientists who gathered as usual for the annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). On this occasion, however, we received an unexpected shock. Rumors were circulating—with circumstantial detail that left little doubt as to their truth—that some highly regarded investigators, previously supported in their unclassified research by the U.S. Public Health Service, had found their grant appl

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Lavish Look at Islamic Technology

By | June 29, 1987

Islamic Technology: An Illustrated History. Ahmad Y. al Hassan and Donald R. Hill. UNESCO and Cambridge University Press, New York, 1987. 304 pp. $39.50. UNESCO sponsorship is a welcome event in the area of Islamic studies. This is particularly true in the case of this excellent treatise, which places Islamic science and technology in its cultural perspective. The book is lavishly furnished with more than 160 illustrations, including photographs—some of rare origin—and schematic draw

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Leo Szilard: The First Pugwash

By | June 29, 1987

The Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs turns 30 on July 7. Leo Szilard, the physicist who since 1945 had been proposing just such a meeting of Russian and Western scientists to discuss arms control, was on hand at the first Pugwash gathering, called by Bertrand Russell and financed by Cyrus Eaton. One of the key figures in the Manhattan Project, Szilard had turned his considerable talents and energy to helping the world learn how to "live with the bomb." On August 15, 1957 he drafte

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Letters

By | June 29, 1987

Ditta Bartels' view that the Victorian government's Infertility (Medical Procedures) Act of 1984 is the correct model for regulating in vitro fertilization (IVF) (The Scientist, April 6, 1987, p. 11) is not an opinion that is necessarily widely shared. Even the Attorney General of Victoria who prepared the legislation told Time Australia (March 23rd, 1987) that embryo experimentation "raises the very fundamental question that some things are better left unsaid. I'm not saying that I espouse that

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M. C. Escher: Master of Tessellation

By | June 29, 1987

M.C. ESCHER: Art and Science. H.S.M. Coxeter, M. Emmer, R. Penrose and M.L Teuber, eds. Elsevier, New York, 1986. 402 pp. $50. Who has failed to notice that exposition in the mathematical sciences is more pictorial lately? Today, it is not uncommon to find technical mathematics illustrated with drawings. And not just with elaborate symbols which, before the morning coffee, resemble an intimidating jumble. There have even appeared in august mathematical journals whole articles consisting entirel

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