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UK Expeditionary Group Mixes Science and Sport

By | June 29, 1987

LONDON—Joe Bradwell and his party of 25 were due to leave England this week on the latest in a series of highly unusual scientffic excursions. Their destination this year is the Karakoram range of mountains in the Himalayas, where they will continue studies on altitude sickness that have im proved strategies for combating this condition—and earned them a considerable reputation for self-experimentation. It is 11 years since A.R. (Joe) Bradwell got together with fellow physicians John

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West Germans Debate Research Indicators

By | June 29, 1987

WEST BERLIN—With a rising pro portion of the budget going to re search, the West German government has become increasingly interested in finding a way to mea sure the quality of the work it is supporting. Its growing interest has triggered a reaction from academics, who argue that such indicators do not give a complete and accurate picture of the academic landscape and that, if used to determine funding, they could disrupt or reduce the current allocation to the nation's universities. The

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Who's That Whale Behind Those Foster Grants?

By | June 29, 1987

My friend Goodbeaker has had one of the more quilted scientific careers I know of, yet one that somehow always seems to follow the cutting edge of research. An academic biologist of no great repute, she thought her career was made last year when her department chairman fled the groves of academe for Turkey in search of Noah's Ark. Passed over for promotion, she languished teaching freshmen the difference between sperm and ova until eight weeks ago when she somehow jumped on the superconducter ba

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Why You Should Typeset Your Papers

By | June 29, 1987

Throughout our scientific careers we are continually judged by the way we present our ideas, methods and results. Although it is generally agreed that scientific work should be judged only on its scientific merits, we all know of excellent papers that were poorly presented at a national meeting, and further handicapped by unreadable slides that compromised some exciting ideas. Intuitively, it is almost trivial to assume that not only the content, but also the presentation governs the effect of o

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'A Profound Crisis of Purpose in Social Science'

By | June 15, 1987

Among the many social scientists who entered the discipline in the late 1960s and early 1970s, it is easy to observe a fundamental disenchantment with the profession. For many of these people, the attraction of social science lay in its potential relevance to the process of social transformation, whether they conceived of it in terms of radical political change or individual self-realization or "liberation." They looked back upon the 1950s and 1960s, when social scientists were engaged in conduc

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Another Outlet for Ethicists

By | June 15, 1987

Bioethics. Vol. 1, No. 1. Helga Kuhse and Peter Singer, eds. Basil Blackwell, New York, 1987. Subscription: $80 (L40) for institutions; $37.50 (L19.50) for individuals. Medical ethics is a growth industry. What better evidence than the appearance of yet another journal devoted to it. In addition to such wholly, dedicated publications as the Hastings Center Report, the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy and the Journal of Medical Ethics, a number of prestigious general journals frequently addres

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Budget Official Urges Cost-Sharing

By | June 15, 1987

WASHINGTON—Cost-sharing arrangements and user fees may take on new prominence in the scientific community with the appointment of a federal official who has applied that approach successfully to federal water projects. Robert K. Dawson, named last month as associate director for natural resources, energy and science within the Office of Management and Budget, believes the private sector should share the cost of federal programs as one step in curbing the budget deficit. He has spent the pa

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D in Europe

By | June 15, 1987

At one time the scene of most of the world's great scientific discoveries, Europe still has a formidable reputation in fields such as particle physics and molecular biology. Yet growing concern about a "technology gap" with the United States and Japan has provided one of the motives for the European Economic Community Framework Program of Research and Technological Development, whose budget for 1987-91 has been the subject of intense political debate in recent months. The United Kingdom, while e

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Developing Damage Control for Bad Data

By | June 15, 1987

Hippocrates wrote "I look upon it as being a great part of the art to be able to judge properly of that which has been written." The aphorism is as true today as it was in his time. One major difference, of course, is scale; today's medical publishers turn out some 15 million pages a year. For a scientist or practitioner to "judge properly" of all that is written within a major discipline is clearly impossible. There are quality control checks, however. Colleagues, peer reviewers, editorial boar

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BRUSSELS—The Commission of the European Economic Community has taken steps to promote a more open flow of technology information between members. Peter Sutherland, EEC competition commissioner, has been charged with drafting regulations to exempt technical agreements from Article 85 of the Treaty of Rome. The article forbids companies from deciding to share markets or reach any agreements that could impair free trade. Although the commission in the past has cracked down on efforts to share

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