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Frustrations Of A Ceramicist

By | May 16, 1988

While nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equipment represents the biggest market for superconductivity technology, more than 60% of the current technology is applied there, the flurry of activity in the new high-temperature superconductors has not yet translated to state-of-the art changes in NMR. In fact, researchers face three major hurdles in the race to realize the potential of these promising ceramics. For most of the past 15 months, attention has centered on YBa2Cu3O7 usually referred

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Government Briefs

May 16, 1988

The rancor of the White House cost David T. Kingsbury, National Science Foundation assistant director for behavioral and biological sciences, a trip to Paris last month. It seems that officials of the Administrations’s Office of Science and Technology Policy are trying to punish him because of allegations that he advised a California biotechnology firm while a government official (see The Scientist, November 2, 1987, p. 3). So they forced Kingsbury’s superiors at NSF to withdraw hi

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Hot Papers

May 16, 1988

HOT PAPERS Date: May 16, 1988 The articles listed below  - all less than a year old -  have received a substantially greater number of citations than those in the same subject area and of the same vintage. A citation-trackihg algorithm of the Institute for Scientific Information has identified these articles.  EW Anderson, G.Baskaran, Z. Zou, T. Hsu, "Resonating-valence-bond theory of phase transitions and superconductivity in La2CuO4-based compounds," Physical Review Letters,

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THE PAPERCLIP CONSPIRACY: The Hunt for the Nazi Scientists Tom Bower Little, Brown Boston; 309 pages; $17.95 An air of secrecy and jealousy permeates the small room set aside for visiting researchers on the 13th floor of the National Archives in Washington, D.C. There, in the archive’s Modern Military Branch, with its newly declassified files, historians and journalists sit elbow to elbow, hunched over documents, rarely speaking to one another. Exposés are in the making. Som

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Independent Lab Briefs

May 16, 1988

If Georgia were a sovereign nation, it would rank sixth in the world in pulp and paper production. Now, fittingly, the state is also the future home of the Institute of Paper Chemistry, an independent research facility and graduate school currently located in Appleton, Wis. The institute has trained more than 25% of the engineers and scientists in the paper and pulp industry. And the move, scheduled to be completed in 1990 and backed by $15 million from the Georgia legislature, will permit Geo

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Industry Briefs

May 16, 1988

The Du Pont Co. may be its own best client for its own new venture: an innovative enterprise dedicated to cleaning contaminated groundwater and soil. Allies in the endeavor are two smaller companies: Biosystems, a Chester, Pa., firm specializing in groundwater clean-up and Dallas-based Halliburton Co., an engineering consulting firm to the petroleum industry. The three will operate jointly as DuPont Biosystems, employing microbiologists, chemists, environmental engineers, and geologists—

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Killer Cells: An Offensive Defense

By | May 16, 1988

When scientists realized that the immune system could discriminate self from non-self, they began to study whether the body could recognize tumor cells as foreign and then eliminate them. An immune response against foreign antigens (for example, viruses or bacteria) typically requires immunization and also that the foreign antigen binds to the body's own major-histocompatibiity [MHC] antigens (for example, HLA or H-2). Using in vitro assays to measure the killing of tumor cells, researchers

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Letters

May 16, 1988

LETTERS Date: May 16, 1988 Double Ties That Bind We were most interested by the article, "Academic Couples Stymied By Attitudes in Workplace," (March 21, 1988) since it bears on a topic we are currently studying. Data on the incidence among women of what we call the "double tie," to a field, by professional degree and by marriage to a man in the same field, are scarce. Our 1985 survey of women physicists disclosed that, of 479 female physicists, 49% were the wives, ex-wives, or widows of physic

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National Lab Briefs

May 16, 1988

Eager to encourage government-industry collaboration on the potential uses of high-temperature superconducting materials, the Reagan administration has rushed to announce an initiative that may be more snap than substance. The April 21 designation of Los Alamos, Argonne, and Oak Ridge national laboratories as superconductivity pilot centers went unaccompanied by additional funding or staff. Furthermore, acknowledged an Energy Department press spokesman, the department has no current plans to e

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Removing nucleic acid and protein samples from electrophoresis gels can take five to 48 hours-when the process succeeds at all. Standard recovery methods often lose much of the sample, contaminate it, or recover a small, amount in a large volume of buffer. Now Sample Saver, a new product from Accurate Chemical & Scientific Corp., allows the user to leach out the sample in one to two hours. The apparatus is based on an electrode bath. Between the positive and negative electrodes is a rotating

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