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March 21, 1988

Designed for loading DNA sequencing samples, the SYPD 3 uL syringe reduces sample contamination. Disposable polycarbonate tips of either 0.34 or 0.19 mm OD prevent sample mixing. Samples do not come in contact with the plunger. The calibrated plunger allows for sample delivery in 0.5-3.0 uL to 0.05 uL increments. The syringe sells for $125. Hoefer Scientific Instruments. NIR Spectrophotometer These fiber optic accessories enhance the versatility of the company’s 6250 near infrared (NI

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NSF Feels Heat On Delayed Centers

By | March 21, 1988

WASHINGTON—The National Science Foundation’s science and technology centers program, intended to be a beacon for collaborative U.S. research that would speed applications to the marketplace, instead has become a lightning rod for criticism from the scientific community. NSF’s decision not to fund any such centers this fiscal year provoked keen disappointment among scientists, especially those who had raced to meet the January 15 deadline. A number of applicants echoed the

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Of Super Tuesday and Superconductivity

By | March 21, 1988

Campaign ‘88 has now passed through the Straits of Super Tuesday. Not all candidates passed in safety. Republican George Bush swamped his opponents, while among the Democrats the field was narrowed considerably, with Michael Dukakis, Albert Gore and Jesse Jackson the apparent survivors. Whoever the eventual nominees for the two parties, the pair should focus their debates, at least in some part, on ways to ensure the effective use of our scientific assets. In our last issue we ran a p

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BOSTON—A Soviet committee created to reduce bureaucracy and increase efficiency within the scientific establishment has received more than 5,000 letters by citizens from all walks of Soviet life. Last month the chairman, Yuri Osipyan (see THE SCIENTIST, January 25, p. 1), carried his message to the annual meeting here of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Osipyan is also director of the Soviet Institute of Solid State Physics. Soviet scientists are eager for more

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. LONDON—The first register of chartered psychologists is being created to emphasize to the public the discipline’s scientific base. The move follows the granting of a Royal Charter to the British Psychological Society, the same status given in recent years to other scientific bodies such as the Institute of Biology. Registration will allow the public, for the first time, to check a psychologist’s credentials; only those registered will be able to use the term “charte

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Revisiting an Intellectual Crossroads

By | March 21, 1988

8p.m. Only two hours late. Not like arriving at 5 a.m. by car from Udine or Venice or somewhere, after winter fog in Milan. The Italian government had hoped that the center would help revive Trieste, once the great port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but in the summer of 1987 it is still off the main air routes. I’m glad to get a lift along the spectacular coast road to the tiny resort of Grignano—but not, this time, to the homely Hotel Mi- gnon. Surprisingly, the luxurious Adria

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Science With a Social Conscience

By | March 21, 1988

LABORATORY Scientists as Political Activists in 1930s America. Peter J. Kuznick. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987. 363 pp. $29.95. Science faced calamity on several fronts during the 1930s, and this fine book by Peter J. Kuznick, assistant professor of history at The American University, tells how American scientists responded. Scientists, he writes, entered the decade with “a peculiar sort of hubris.” They were elitist, politically conservative or uninvolved, an

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So They Say

March 21, 1988

People on the Private Side I set up the [National Cancer Institute’s biological response modification program beginning in 1980, and I left in February of 1984, and during that time I actually was trying to get more private involvement, to get a closer interface with the biotechnology industry, to get rotating scientists in from outside to try to open up and liberalize some of the viewpoints within the N.C.I. system.... They almost totally rejected it. It was a real closed shop in ter

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Teaching After Science Careers

By | March 21, 1988

Sixty-year-old Donald G. Simpson, a retired air force lieutenant colonel, says he has a lot to offer the students in his science classes at Sanderson High School in Raleigh, N.C. “I know what to expect from the students because I’ve raised my own family. I think those school teachers who are kids themselves can’t understand their students as well as I can.” Fifty-seven-year-old Daniel Trollinger, a chemist at General Electric in Columbia, Md., is in the process of get

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The Crisis in Soviet Computer Science

By | March 21, 1988

During my recent stay in Moscow I was told several different variations on the following anecdote. Japanese experts were invited to assess the state of Soviet electronics and computer technology, and to tell their hosts how long it would take for the Soviet Union to catch up to Japan. “We thought you were behind us 15 or 20 years,” the Japanese experts responded, “But now we have come to the conclusion that it is forever.” A professor in Moscow told me that in the 194

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