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NSF Struggles To Pay A Fair Wage

By | June 13, 1988

The foundation battles to get the best and the brightest WASHINGTON--William WuIf is the kind of person who believes that when you’ve been supported by a system, you have an obligation to give something back someday. So the University of Virginia computer scientist was sorely tempted when the National Science Foundation asked him to come to Washington for two or three years to run its computer and information science and engineering directorate. As a young professor, Wulf had benefited f

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Opinion

By | June 13, 1988

Opinion Don’t Link U.S.-Soviet Exchanges To Human Rights Author:HERBERT ABRAMS Date: June 13, 1988 One of the major controversies surrounding exchanges between U.S. and Soviet scientists is whether action on human rights should be a prerequisite for communication. A number of scientists have argued that it should. A few years ago, for example, the National Academy of Sciences canceled formal exchanges with the Soviet Union because of the plight of a number of Soviet scientists, particular

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Private Institute Briefs

June 13, 1988

Want to take a cruise in the Black Sea? Short of defecting to the Soviet Union, the best way may be to join up with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The institution’s research vessel Know the first U.S. ship to enter the Black Sea in 13 years, is in the middle of a planned series of six trips to the Soviet body of water. Its scientists are using the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl disaster to study circulation patterns and chemical processes in the sea. Meanwhile, back in

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Robert Gale's Inside Story Of His Chemobyl Days

By | June 13, 1988

FINAL WARNING: The Legacy of Chemobyl Robert P Gale and Thomas Hauser Warner Books; New York 230 pages; $18.95 The second anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster in April was marked by the publication of several books, each trying to tell the story from a different angle, each attempting to serve a different political purpose. One of them, Richard Mould’s Chernobyl The Real Story (Pergamon Press), got the full endorsement and cooperation of Soviet authorities. The book contains 160 photog

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Science Grants

June 13, 1988

Following Is a selection of notable grants that have been awarded recently by public and private funding sources. PHYSIOLOGY: Auditory Cortex. $1,894,000 over three years from NIH to University of California, Irvine; L. Kitzes NEUROSCIENCE: Growth factors or other trophic factors in brain injury. $25,000 from Toyota USA Foundation to University of California, San Francisco; F.M. Longo, WC. Mobley Molecular and developmental neuroscience and computational neuroscience. $375,000 from Del E. We

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Recent science magazine covers have taken to displaying dazzling images of the surfaces of metals and semiconductors. These come from scanning tunneling microscopes, which let scientists look at images of individual atoms and even smaller features. The operating principle of the scanning tunneling microscope is radically different from other microscopes. It makes use of the fact that solids are covered with a microscopic “atmosphere” of electrons. The instrument lowers a tiny met

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Share Those Cell Lines!

By | June 13, 1988

In the interview on the following pages, John Maddox raises an issue in the ethics of science about which we need more open discussion in quest of a better articulated consensus. Exactly what is the obligation of scientists to distribute cell lines, virus strains, DNA clones, and other critical research materials? In the physical sciences, one generally expects to be able to follow a published recipe with available materials and achieve the results claimed. In biology, however, it often happe

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Study Sees Big Leap In Science Jobs By 2000

By | June 13, 1988

Profession Study Sees Big Leap In Science Jobs By 2000 Author:WENDY WALKER Date: June 13, 1988 Brisk hiring for public-and private-sector life scientists expected to set pace The number of jobs in scientific fields will increase by 27% between now and the year 2000, according to a recent forecast by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). At this rate of gain, scientists will find their specialties listed among neither the fastest-growing occupations—such as paralegals, medical a

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The Agricultural Research Service's Bitter Harvest

By | June 13, 1988

ARS’s respected administrator has retired but not without blasting his successor WASHINGTON--When Terry B. Kinney Jr. decided to retire as administrator of the Agricultural Research Service, he planned an orderly transition. He announced his intentions early so that his boss would have ample time to find a replacement, and he made it clear that he would remain long enough to train his successor. In addition, he discussed with others the need to bring on a savvy Washington insider. Kinn

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The Great U.S. Supercomputer

By | June 13, 1988

Competition with fancy machines and wads of cash, state schools steal national center scientists Christmas came early in 1985 for serious number crunchers. In the spring of that year, the National Science Foundation christened five national supercomputing centers and sent them forth into the world to meet the grand challenges of science and engineering. The NSF's idea was to fund these silicon meccas so that they could maintain state-of-the-art technical facilities and provide supercomputing

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