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Powerful Plus to a Word Processor

By | October 19, 1987

EXACT Technical Support Software Inc. 72 Kent Street Brookline, MA 02146 (617) 734-4130 Price: $475 Requirements:128K RAM, DOS 2.0 or later, color or monochrome graphics board Exact is better described as a text formatting language program than a word processor. In fact, it is intended to be used to augment your favorite word processing software to provide enhanced mathematical and scientific formatting capabilities. Exact does not have menus or editing functions, and its “what you s

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Simple, But Not Quite Complete

By | October 19, 1987

VOLKS WRITER SCIENTIFIC Lifetree Software Inc. 411 Pacific Street Monterey, CA 93940 (800) 543-3873 (800) 831-8733 (in Callibmia) Price: $495 Requirements: 256K RAM, DOS 2.0 or later, IBM color graphics card or equivalent (will not work with EGA) Perhaps the greatest advantage of Volkswriter Scientific is its simplicity. Simple menus guide you through edit sessions with ease. “What you see is what you get” (WYSIWYG) graphics capabilities facilitate its use. Despite these plusses,

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So They Say

October 19, 1987

A Dialogue Grows Up One underlying trend I have seen is a slow but steady integration of science and technology into the mainstream of national policy. This has occurred much more slowly than most scientists would have hoped, especially in the light of the rhetoric of the early sixties. Yet the dialogue between the public and the scientific community has become considerably more mature and sophisticated on both sides. Even while criticizing some of the activity and results of science, politic

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Someone's Blowing Smoke In My Eyes

By | October 19, 1987

There is cheering news from Washington, D.C., for inveterate bedtime smokers. Scientists at the National Bureau of Standards have announced that it is possible to produce cigarettes that are less likely to set the mattress on fire should they tumble from the lips of smokers succumbing to the lures of Morpheus. Moreover, the scientists say, these modem marvels will contain no more tar or nicotine than do low-tech cigarettes! (Cigarette ad, 1988: “Same great taste; won’t lay the hou

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Strobel: 'I Have Acted in Good Faith'

By | October 19, 1987

GARY STROBEL Dutch elm disease. . . is known throughout North America and Europe as one of the most destructive killers of American elm trees. It has been estimated that over half the recreational elms in the U.S.A., numbering in the millions, have been destroyed by this pathogen.... The bacteria which was injected into the 14 elm trees was not genetically engineered. By definition, the NIH guidelines for recombinantDNAresearch do not apply.. . I had called.... . the USDA, [which] informed me

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Karo Bio will focus on infectious disease, steroids and bone regeneration drugs. The research, conducted by a staff that is expected to reach more than 100 scientists by late 1989, will be carried out at the Huddings Hospital near here. In addition to having exclusive European licensing rights to products it develops, the new company will gain European rights to the nasal drug delivery system evolved by California Biotech that is undergoing clinical trials for use with substances such as insul

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Tax Law Shrinks Stipends

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—Thanks to the new tax law, many U.S. graduate students this year will owe taxes on their fellowships and stipends for the first time. And some will see their financial aid shrink accordingly. “There’s a lot of dissatisfaction, dissension and anger” among affected students about the new tax regulations, said Patrick Melia, assistant dean of the graduate school at Georgetown University here. “It’s created a lot of unneeded frustration.” U

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The Search for 'Fitness' in Nature

By | October 19, 1987

Biophysicist Harold Morowitz spent his last sabbatical pondering the cosmic mysteries aboard a yacht anchored off the West Maui mountains in Hawaii. The result of his musings can be found in Cosmic Joy and Local Pain: Musings of a Mystic Scientist (Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1987). [For a review of the book, see THE SCIENTIST, September 21, 1987, p. 20]. The first possession he packed for his trip was Lawrence Henderson’s book The Fitness of the Environment. In this excerpt, Morowitz

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The Tipped Scales Of High Technology

By | October 19, 1987

A HIGH TECHNOLOGY GAP? Europe, America and Japan. Andrew J. Pierre, ed. New York, University Press, New York, 1987. 114 pp. $20.50. This short book, the sixth in a series on relations between Western Europe and the United States published by the Council on Foreign Relations, is an excellent collection of papers by four influential men: Frank Press, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences; Hubert Curien, professor on the Faculté des Sciences at the University of Paris; Carlo D

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The Year Past, the Years Ahead

By | October 19, 1987

When launching THE SCIENTIST one year ago, we promised readers a unique publication—the first newspaper for science professionals. We said it would be filled with useful information that scientists and policy-makers could apply in their daily work. We promised news and features found nowhere else. What’s more, we promised an attractive newspaper with arresting color illustrations, an accessible tabloid format, and concise, crisply written stories that respected the time of busy re

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