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Association Briefs

June 27, 1988

Public Interest In Science Surges The public’s interest in science has boomed in the last decade and science museums are proliferating in response. According to preliminary findings of an international study conducted by the Association of Science-Technology Centers, attendance at U.S. science centers grew 38% from 1979 to 1986. In addition, 16% of the 131 institutions responding said they had been founded within the past seven years. Even more indicative of the growth trend: four out o

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Boston Lab Small Scale, Grand Achievement

By | June 27, 1988

Geneticist Kunkel shows how breakthroughs can be made without big budgets, big staffs, or big bullies When it comes to tackling scientific problems of enormous difficulty, Louis M. Kunkel’s seven-member team at Boston’s Children’s Hospital proves that it isn’t always necessary to have a big staff or to have a big budget. And it’s not necessary to play rough, either. For five years, Kunkel and his crew have been doggedly pursuing the genetic basis of muscular d

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Does The U.S. Need The Private Space Station?

By | June 27, 1988

  Volume 2, #12 The Scientist June 27, 1988 Does The U.S. Need The Private Space Station?   U.S. competitiveness will suffer if we don't build it now, by Gregg R. Fawkes Let's find out who will use it before we waste a billion dollars, by John Pike Date: June 27, 1988 Two years ago, the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger etched its searing images on minds of the U.S. public—and crippled the country’s space effort Experiments, satellites, and

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Entrepreneur Briefs

June 27, 1988

Perestroika Comes None Too Soon Mikhail Gorbachev’s push to improve health care in the Soviet Union has led the Soviets to the doorstep of a small firm in Falmouth, Mass. Called Associates on Cape Cod, the venture was founded in 1974 by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution microbiologist Stanley Watson and pioneered the commercial use of a substance derived from the blood of horseshoe crabs—limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)—to test for pyrogens in drugs. The new procedure was c

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For Writer's Headache, Try A Grammar Checker

By | June 27, 1988

Spreadsheets and outliners are joining scientific word processors and number crunchers in scientists’ software libraries. While it would be nice to add to the nonscientific shelf a package that cleans up grammatical errors and stylistic blunders as well, I’m still in search of the perfect grammar checker. Grammar rules are not easy for scientists to learn and remember just consider how hard it is to create a set of simple rules to teach grammar to what is, after all, a dumb com

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Four Years In The Making: A Superstring Revolution

By | June 27, 1988

In August 1984, M. Green and J. Schwarz ushered in the latest revolution in particle physics with their discovery of mathematically consistent superstring theories. Since then, there has been a vast effort to understand string theory and to bring it to bear on the major unsolved problems of particle physics. Some have hailed it as the final unified theory of everything, while others have damned it as recreational mathematics, theology, or something worse. What is the theory that has caused thi

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Funding Briefs

June 27, 1988

A Noble Gesture Toward Plant Biology The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, long active in medical research and agriculture, is taking bids on building a laboratory and recruiting staff for a new division of plant biology. By September of this year, the foundation hopes to have a core of 20 of its own researchers, which will expand to 40 in the next four or five years. The division will fund in-house research as well as supporting labs at other institutions. Plant biologist Richard Dixon arrive

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Government Briefs

June 27, 1988

Hitting The Magic Billion-Dollar Mark The recent AIDS report by the Institute of Medicine got a lot of play in the press for its criticism of federal efforts on behalf of drug abusers and AIDS sufferers facing discrimination. But the report also contains an important message for researchers. Entitled Confronting AIDS: Update 1988” because it follows up on IOM’s landmark 1986 report, the study calls on the NIH director to evaluate how well the government is spending its money in a s

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Hot Papers

June 27, 1988

The articles listed below, all less than a year old, have received a substantially greater number of citations than those in the same subject area and of the same vintage. A citation-tracking algorithm of the Institute for Scientific Information has identified these articles. G. Baskaran, Z. Zou, E.W. Anderson, “The resonating valence bond state and high-Tc superconductivity. a mean field theory,” Solid State Communcations, 63 (11), 973-6, September 1987 P.J. Bjorkman, M.A. Saper, B.

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A new generation of dot-matrix printers has hit the market, and these devices are ideal for the scientist whose institution can’t af- ford to put a laser printer in every office. The new 24-pin units provide better print quality and more time-saving features than older 24-pin printers, yet they cost much less than laser printers. Now a small laboratory can get high-resolution text and graphics (180 X 360 dote per square inch) for what used to be a low-resolution-only price of aroun

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