Magazine

Most Recent

The Agricultural Research Service's Bitter Harvest

By | June 13, 1988

ARS’s respected administrator has retired but not without blasting his successor WASHINGTON--When Terry B. Kinney Jr. decided to retire as administrator of the Agricultural Research Service, he planned an orderly transition. He announced his intentions early so that his boss would have ample time to find a replacement, and he made it clear that he would remain long enough to train his successor. In addition, he discussed with others the need to bring on a savvy Washington insider. Kinn

0 Comments

The Great U.S. Supercomputer

By | June 13, 1988

Competition with fancy machines and wads of cash, state schools steal national center scientists Christmas came early in 1985 for serious number crunchers. In the spring of that year, the National Science Foundation christened five national supercomputing centers and sent them forth into the world to meet the grand challenges of science and engineering. The NSF's idea was to fund these silicon meccas so that they could maintain state-of-the-art technical facilities and provide supercomputing

0 Comments

Between 1977 and 1986, the United States produced more than 42% of all articles on mapping and sequencing the human genome that appeared in 3,200 of the world’s leading scientific journals, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) reported in a study issued in late April. “The United States is the clear leader in basic research, publishing more articles on mapping and sequencing than European or Asian nations,” it concluded. The next largest contributor over t

0 Comments

University Briefs

June 13, 1988

Rebuffed in February by a California lower court, four former and one current University of California professors and the American Federation of Teachers have vowed to continue their fight against the university’s tenure and promotion peer review process by filing an appeal. The professors’ suit charges that the standard practice of keeping the identity of peer reviewers secret violates each candidate’s right of due process. "This is the first time in the country that this se

0 Comments

Few issues have caused more fear and confusion than the question of the hazards of low-level radiation. There has been a remarkable failure to examine closely the evidence when discussing the issue and planning future studies. As a result, the public’s radiation phobia has been needlessly reinforced, and public money is being used on studies that are bound to be inconclusive. The problem arises, in part, because the general public—and even most scientists—are not aware that

0 Comments

Upstart Phylogenists Slug it Out Over Primate Data

By | June 13, 1988

Caviling, carping, and quarreling, is this any way to advance science? New HAVEN, CONN. "For a science that deals with the apparently simple question of who is related to whom, phylogeny has been positively littered with bones of contention. The root problem, explains former Yale University taxonomist Charles Sibley, is that a creatures appearance may not always bean accurate guide to its place in the pantheon of beasts. So until recently, phylogenists were left to cavil over the appropriate

0 Comments

For anyone who has spent hours with pen in hand, poring over a word-processed scientific manuscript and filling in a multitude of blanks with equations and complicated graphs, the latest generation of desktop publishing software may sound like a dream come true. After all, some of these programs combine an array of capabilities that can make the operator the equivalent of a typesetter and layout artist. They allow the fluent integration of different functions— spreadsheets, word processor

0 Comments

Are Soviet Scientists Publishing Abroad? Nyet Yet

By | May 30, 1988

With General Secretary Gorbachev and President Reagan scheduled to meet in Moscow this week, bets are on that the two leaders will be singing the praises of glasnost. But the policy of more openness (less censorship) has affected "only domestic media such as magazines and newspapers," says Thores Medvedev, an-exiled Soviet scientist, now at the National Institute for Medical Research in London. Indeed, despite the recent appearance of a number of prominent Soviet scientists at foreign meetings,

0 Comments

Articles Alert

May 30, 1988

BY BRUCE G. BUCHANAN Knowledge Systems Laboratory Stanford University Palo Alto, Calif. " History keeps us honest. Consider, for example, Charles Babbage. Babbage was a genius who anticipated many design features of modem computers, but his ideas had to be reinvented many decades after his death in 1870. A.G. Bromley, "The evolution of Babbage’s computing engines," Annals of the History of Computing, 9 (2), 113-36, 1987. " When organizations introduce electronic mail systems, they oft

0 Comments

Association Briefs

May 30, 1988

Engineers seem to believe that the work of scientists will drastically alter their lives by the year 2000, according to preliminary results of a study that is being conducted for the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. When members of SME were asked to look into the future, they predicted revolutionary advances in biotechnology, laser applications, sensor technology, expert systems, and manufacturing in space. A startling 40% of the 7,560 early respondents didn’t even believe their prese

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself
  2. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
  3. Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked
    The Nutshell Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked

    According to a document posted online less than a day before the release of the official 2018 budget proposal, the National Institutes of Health could face even deeper cuts than previously suggested by the Trump administration.

  4. Cooking Up Cancer?
    Notebook Cooking Up Cancer?

    Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

AAAS