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Scientific Word Processor Integrates Tricky Symbols

By | July 11, 1988

Organic chemists and biochemists are likely to find ChemText, a scientific word processor from Molecular Design Ltd.; a powerful tool for smoothly integrating graphics and text in scientific documents. This versatile software package is equally suitable for both academic and industrial scientists. My experience with ChemText Version 1.1 stems from teaching a traditional two-semester organic chemistry course. However, I recently received the new Version 1.2 and have fiddled with it enough to

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Scientists Take On 'Year Of The Glove'

By | July 11, 1988

For scientists and health care professionals working with blood and tissue products, 1988 may well go down in history as the “Year of the Glove,” as the demand for rubber gloves soars. “We’ve seen a doubling of demand since the last quarter of 1987,” says Les Jacobson, of Baxter International Inc., a large medical glove manufacturer based in Chicago, Ill. “Glove manufacturers are switching their product mix— robbing Peter to pay Paul—to ease th

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The Peer-Review System: Pique. and Critique

By | July 11, 1988

In 1978, physicist Richard A. Muller of Berkeley was awarded two distinguished prizes—the Waterman Award and the Texas Instruments Foundation Founders’ Prize—for his research on cosmic rays and adaptive optics. The event was particularly notable because Muller had been refused support for this work after peer review by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Defense. Many innovative

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The past few months have been difficult ones for the National Institutes of Health and its director, James B. Wyngaarden. A series of public controversies has rocked the institution, tarnishing what many regard as the crown jewel of the federal scientific establishment. The Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees NIH, removed Edwin Becker as head of NIH’S Office of Research Services for “inefficiency and mismanagement,” despite strong opposition from Wyngaard

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University Briefs

July 11, 1988

Driven by a vision that reaches across time, distance, and space, the International Space University opened its doors last month, welcoming an elite group of students and faculty from around the world. For nine weeks at MIT, 105 graduate-level students from 20 countries will study such topics as space policy and law, space architecture, and satellite applications with experts from academia, industry, and government. The unique program—founded by two graduate students—will occur n

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THE SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDE Frederick Grinnell Westuiew; Boulder, Col.; 141 pages; $29.50 (hardback), $13.50 (paperback) “Serious play.” A “myth of scientific induction.” An amalgam of “politics, sex, wine, movies, teamwork, rivalry genius, stupidity and virtually everything that make life in the lab and out something less than perfect and a great deal more than dull.” These are but three of the many descriptions of science quoted by cell biologist, Frederic

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Also Notable

June 27, 1988

THE ROLE OF BEHAVIOR IN EVOLUTION H.C. Plothin, editor; MIT; Cambridge; 240 pages; $27.50 Navigating through what the editor, H.C. Plotkin, calls “conceptual minefields,” the six essays presented in this volume explore the role of phenotypic behavior in evolution. Topics include the relationship between learning and evolution, an alternative hierarchy of replicators-interactors-lineages, and the evolutionary role of social systems. Besides Plotkin, contributors include David L.

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THE STATUE WITHIN: An Autobiography Francois Jacob; translated by Franklin Philip Basic Books; New York; 326 pages; $22.95 Francois Jacob is the most illustrious of French scientists living today. His autobiography, La Statue Intérieure, has drawn wide attention in France. Now in its lucid English translation, The Statue Within should have an equally broad appeal in the U.S. As a work of literature, it evokes unmistakable overtones of Rousseau, Proust, and Sartre—it is hard to imag

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Articles Alert

By | June 27, 1988

The Scientist has asked a group of experts periodically comment upon recent articles that they have found noteworthy. Their selections, to be presented here in every issue, are neither endorsements of content nor the result of systematic searching. Rather, they are personal choices of articles they believe the scientific community as a whole may also find interesting. Reprints of any articles cited here may be ordered through The Genuine Article, 3501 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. PLAN

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Association Briefs

June 27, 1988

Public Interest In Science Surges The public’s interest in science has boomed in the last decade and science museums are proliferating in response. According to preliminary findings of an international study conducted by the Association of Science-Technology Centers, attendance at U.S. science centers grew 38% from 1979 to 1986. In addition, 16% of the 131 institutions responding said they had been founded within the past seven years. Even more indicative of the growth trend: four out o

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