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So They Say

January 11, 1988

The Tourist Trade Prince Charles to The Rescue? Conflicts of Interest In Pursuit of Truth Problems In Portugal Is Chemistry a Dirty Word? Crushing Our Conservative Shell Doing Nothing and Lying About It R.R. Was Here A Welcome and Exciting Change A Plea from Jane Goodall Superconducting Supercollider: Not a Now or Never Decision Practitioners Are Not Just Slow Scientists The Glamour Factor As I see it, enterprising scientists will have to resort to the tourist trade like everyone [in Bri

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Soviets Seek West's Help on AIDS

By | January 11, 1988

WASHINGTON--Two years ago Soviet officials were in the midst of a vigorous international campaign of disinformation about the U.S. Army's supposed role in the spread of AIDS. This week top officials from the American and Soviet national academies of science and medicine are scheduled to meet in Moscow to discuss cooperative scientific ventures between the two countries, including possible collaboration on immunological and vaccine research that could help in the fight against AIDS. It is too

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States Luring Scientists With Salaries, Facilities

By | January 11, 1988

Although such appropriations and bond issues promise to foster excellence throughout the state, the primary beneficiaries of much pump priming are usually state colleges and universities. These efforts, in turn, have triggered recruitment wars between established research institutions and newer programs trying to join the top echelon. The bidding is particularly fierce in such fields as ceramics, computers, chemical engineering and all aspects of biotechnology. And although higher salaries alo

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The Cost of a Fortress Science Mentality

By | January 11, 1988

Our titanic national debt will eventually force hard decisions. Science funding will not be exempted. When that time comes, a public that has heard from the scientific community about why its work is valuable will more likely support science than one that hasn't. We cannot expect the public to respond positively if we have not told them our story. We can only do so through the media. Molecular biologist Bryan Sykes of Oxford University recently spent seven weeks working for a British televis

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The Cost of a Fortress Science Mentality

By | January 11, 1988

Our titanic national debt will eventually force hard decisions. Science funding will not be exempted. When that time comes, a public that has heard from the scientific community about why its work is valuable will more likely support science than one that hasn't. We cannot expect the public to respond positively if we have not told them our story. We can only do so through the media. Molecular biologist Bryan Sykes of Oxford University recently spent seven weeks working for a British televis

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The Fuchs Case: Can Secrecy in Science Work?

By | January 11, 1988

Today much information has recently become available, including U.S. Atomic Energy Commission files and FBI files on Fuchs' statements and on his and Gold's confessions, as well as memoirs published by Fuchs' communist associates in England. From these and other sources it is clear that many aspects of the case were kept from the public in order to conceal important political secrets, not just atomic ones. One political secret was how Fuchs' spying was discovered in the first place. We now kno

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The Pluses and Minuses of TeX

By | January 11, 1988

For one thing, no computer is as natural as pencil and paper. Placing a word in a certain location, writing in big letters or changing to script or Greek can be done almost without thinking when using a pencil, but all these actions require explicit commands when using a keyboard. It's difficult to build a system with easy-to-remember commands, in large part because ease of use depends upon personal preference. For many people, typing "center," or the command "ce" to center a line is easier tha

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Two All-in-One Programs for the Mac

By | January 11, 1988

MACTeX Version 2.0 FTL Systems Inc. 234 Eglinton Avenue East Suite 205 Toronto, Ontario Canada. M4P I K5 (416) 487-2142 Requirements: MacPlus, Mac SE or Mac II. Hard disk highly recommended. Printer support: Apple Laserwriter Laserwriter Plus and any PostScript based printing device. Documentation: Comes with its own 110-page manual. TeXbook and LaTeX Price: $750 TeXtures Version 1.0 Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. 6 Jacob Way Reading, MA 01867 (617) 944-6795 RequIrements: Runs on Mac 512,

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Two U.K. Trade Unions Merge, Seek Growth Among Scientists

By | January 11, 1988

LONDON-A major new trade union has emerged in Britain with the goal of organizing skilled workers in the new technologies. With trade union membership falling, the new organization, known as Manufacturing, Science and Finance (MSF), hopes to extend the frontiers of organized labor into areas where recruitment has been difficult. Its co-leaders, Clive Jenkins and Ken Gill, are confident that the new union can establish its identity quickly. MSF is the product of the merger of two medium-sized

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STOCKHOLM--The Nobel Foundation plans to sell stock in a new firm being formed to preserve the value of the annual prizes it awards.. . . This year's prizes.. . will each be worth $340,000... . Shrewd investments in the past decade. . . have reversed years of declining value for the prizes, and have raised the foundation's assets to near the real value of the original estate in 1900. --From THE SCIENTIST October 5, 1987, p.4. Lend an ear to hear the story of my galloping success. I was onc

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