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The Search for 'Fitness' in Nature

By | October 19, 1987

Biophysicist Harold Morowitz spent his last sabbatical pondering the cosmic mysteries aboard a yacht anchored off the West Maui mountains in Hawaii. The result of his musings can be found in Cosmic Joy and Local Pain: Musings of a Mystic Scientist (Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1987). [For a review of the book, see THE SCIENTIST, September 21, 1987, p. 20]. The first possession he packed for his trip was Lawrence Henderson’s book The Fitness of the Environment. In this excerpt, Morowitz

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The Tipped Scales Of High Technology

By | October 19, 1987

A HIGH TECHNOLOGY GAP? Europe, America and Japan. Andrew J. Pierre, ed. New York, University Press, New York, 1987. 114 pp. $20.50. This short book, the sixth in a series on relations between Western Europe and the United States published by the Council on Foreign Relations, is an excellent collection of papers by four influential men: Frank Press, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences; Hubert Curien, professor on the Faculté des Sciences at the University of Paris; Carlo D

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The Year Past, the Years Ahead

By | October 19, 1987

When launching THE SCIENTIST one year ago, we promised readers a unique publication—the first newspaper for science professionals. We said it would be filled with useful information that scientists and policy-makers could apply in their daily work. We promised news and features found nowhere else. What’s more, we promised an attractive newspaper with arresting color illustrations, an accessible tabloid format, and concise, crisply written stories that respected the time of busy re

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TIAA Report Asks Choice

October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—A draft report on the nation’s largest teachers’ pension system recommends a variety of new investment choices for its policyholders—but still may not silence its swelling chorus of critics. The report by a special trustee committee of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) calls for adding six pension funds to the $63 billion system. More than 1 million policyholders have joined the system in plans offere

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TIAA Report Asks Choice

October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—A draft report on the nation’s largest teachers’ pension system recommends a variety of new investment choices for its policyholders—but still may not silence its swelling chorus of critics. The report by a special trustee committee of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) calls for adding six pension funds to the $63 billion system. More than 1 million policyholders have joined the system in plans offere

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UC Looks for Payoffs from Weapons Labs

By | October 19, 1987

LIVERMORE, CALIF.—The University of California will continue to run the nation’s two federal laboratories for designing nuclear weapons, with a new five-year contract that nearly doubles its management fee. Officials said that much of the extra money will be spent on commercializing research from the federal labs. The regents voted 17-3, with one abstention, to maintain the university’s ties to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., and the Los Ala

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Well-Suited for Technical Documents

By | October 19, 1987

MANUSCRIPT Lotus Development Corp. 55 Cambridge Parkway Cambridge, MA 02142 (617) 577-8500 Price: $495 Requirements: 512K RAM, hard disk, DOS 2.0 or later Manuscript is a technical word processor capable of handling anything from a short memo to an entire book. Although it lacks “what you see is what you get” (WYSIWYG) capabilities, it is full of features that let you combine graphics and text on the same page easily, import data from 1-2-3 and Symphony and format com plex scient

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What's the Sporting Use of Science?

By | October 19, 1987

One of the most highly motivated scientists I have observed over the years has devoted much of his career to testing athletes for illicit drugs. He is an energetic man, a resourceful technician and a person clearly inspired by the goal of achieving total fairness in the gladiatorial arena. He argues forcefully for the proposition that international sporting competitions (indeed, any sporting competition) should be free of artificial chemical crutches. His ideal is the Olympic ideal—the n

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A Physiologist Who Never Said Die

By | October 5, 1987

CONTROLLING LIFE Jacques Loeb and the Engineering Ideal in Biology. Philip J. Pauly. Oxford University Press, New York, 1987. 252 pp. $24.95. Few scientists today would consider modeling their professional development on the life of Jacques Loeb (1859-1924). Despite considerable accomplishments, Loeb felt embattled for most of his career. As a German Jew, he was alienated from American academic and social circles, and on several occasions his religion served to limit and even deny him prof

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A Report That Brings Space Biology Down to Earth

By | October 5, 1987

A STRATEGY FOR SPACE BIOLOGY AND MEDICAL SCIENCE For the 1980s and 1990s. Committee on Space Biology and Medicine, Space Science Board, Commission on physical Sciences, Mathematics and Resources, National Research Council. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 1987. 196 pp. This report, which represents the collective thinking of some 60 scientists, was developed over the course of two and a half years in series of meetings of the Space Science Board’s Committee on Space Biology and

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