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Industry Briefs

May 30, 1988

Three Japanese behemoths led the list of companies receiving the most U.S. patents in 1987. Canon K.K., Hitachi Ltd., and Toshiba together received more patents (2,515) than General Electric Co., IBM Corp., and RCA Corp. (1,874), according to a study by Intellectual Property Owners. The Japanese also raced to a commanding lead in the auto industry, where Mitsubishi, Honda, and Toyota each chalked up more patents than the U.S. leader, General Motors. All told, 29 Japanese companies appear amon

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Kodak, The ‘Great Yellow Father,’ AUTHOR: MATT DAMSKER Date: May 30, 1988 Is Innovating Like A Newborn To young scientists, it’s yuppie paradise; to the veterans, a mixed blessing ROCHESTER, N.Y—The old Kodak is still in evidence here. Downtown, the dignified brown skyscraper lords the familiar logo over Rochester as it has for more than half a century. A few miles to the north, there’s the company’s sprawling scientific complex, Kodak Park, and, at its hu

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Letters

May 30, 1988

LETTERS Date: May 30, 1988 Too Many Papers I would like to express my enthusiastic agreement with the letter from Jeanne F. Loring (May 2, 1988, p. 9). All my colleagues and I are troubled by the rapidly increasing number of articles we’d like to read. As Loring points out, simply scanning the titles of potentially interesting articles in potentially interesting journals can no longer be done in a satisfactory way. Like Loring, I know scientists who publish 50 or more (in some cases over

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THE CONQUEST OF THE MICROCHIP Hans Queisser Harvard University Press; Cambridge; 185 pages; $24.95 Thoughtful U.S. scientists might wonder why Europe lags so far behind in microelectronics. Hans Queisser, director of the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, West Germany, offers a precise explanation: "The significance of silicon was underestimated, the economic miracle of post-World War II reconstruction was based on conventional industry, and public and government prior

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Marine Animals: Clear Models For Medical Science

By | May 30, 1988

The icefish totally lacks red blood cells or hemoglobin. Is it possible that this fish has a secret to share with human anemics? The male anglerfish grafts itself to the female in order to reproduce. What if scientists could learn how better to overcome transplantation incompatibility from the angler couple? Sharks rarely develop cancerous tumors. Do they benefit from an as yet undetected protective mechanism against malignant neoplasms that could prove useful in treating human cancer victims?

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Foundation to fund research on cancer and cognitive neuroscience The James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis is moving millions to support research in two new areas: cancer research and cognitive neuroscience. For thefirst time, the foundation is inviting proposals, due July 15, to fund research exploring both basic cancer biology and ways the knowledge gained from that research might be transferred to clinics. The foundation has budgeted up to $10 million over the next five years for the

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More Protection For Lab Animals?

By | May 30, 1988

Options More Protection For Lab Animals? AUTHOR: ARTHUR C. GUYTON Date: May 30, 1988 Unnecessary Rules Are Already Strangling Medical Research In the past few years, attacks on medical research by animal "welfare" groups have become vicious, even violent. Their tactics are clearly paying off. The costs of using animals in medical research have soared. Even more chilling, allowable procedures for using animals are becoming so restrictive that research now takes far more time, energy, and int

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National Lab Briefs

May 30, 1988

Scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory have picked up a strong—and unwelcome—signal from a source close to home. NSF has slashed the observatory’s research equipment budget in half, cut staff by 10 percent, and sharply reduced funding for postdocs. This is the fourth straight year of shrinking budgets for the program, which includes three observatories and 10 very long baseline array antennas being constructed around the country. Recruiters at Los Alamos Na

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NIH Sees Computerization As Remedy For Paper Flood

By | May 30, 1988

Automated grant system could cut months off the proposal process. By 1990, the paper weight could lighten, those grant applications filling the mailrooms at the National Institutes of Health at the rate of 40 or so pages times seven copies times 25,000 proposals a year. The retyping at NIH could ease, too. Probably few grantees are aware that much of the administrative information on grant appli- cations is rekeyed in its travels through the agency. The abstract is retyped twice. To defe

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Within five years, the National Science Foundation hopes to receive a "substantial" number of proposals electronically, according to Alvin Thaler, NSF’s point man for computerizing document transfer. By late fall, Thaler hopes to see a test proposal arrive electronically, complete with tables, equations, diagrams, and photographs. In the meantime about 40,000 proposals a year arrive at NSF, each one (with its copies) about a foot thick. Line them up on a shelf and you have "seven miles

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