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Science for Women and Minorities

By | November 30, 1987

Why should we be concerned about educating women and minorities to participate in science and engineering? First of all, as American citizens, women and minorities have a right to a quality education and they should not be excluded from study in any field. Indeed, they should be encouraged to enter quantitative fields because we need scientists and engineers. Second, women constitute more than 50 percent of our population (and 44 percent of our work force), and by the year 2000 one out of eve

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Scientific Monkey Business in the U.S.S.R.

By | November 30, 1987

For some time now, I’ve been followmg with interest media accounts of the effects of glasnost on life in the Soviet Union. It’s certainly been heartening, for example, to witness the release of the dissident Soviet physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov, and Anatoly Shcharansky. Now if only another major Soviet science figure currently living in internal exile would receive a kindly phone call from Mr. Gorbachev! I’m speaking, of course, of Yerosha, the brave little monkey

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So They Say

November 30, 1987

All the scientists on earth should unite to devote the best of their energies and abilities to abolish the use of science for destructive purposes, to persuade the governments, as well as the applied scientists themselves, not to engage in wrong uses of science, to spread right understanding over the world, to stop the arms race, to immediately destroy all dangerous weapons and to implement an international supervision of disarmament. Of course these are tremendously different tasks, but scient

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Soviets Seek University-Industry Link

By | November 30, 1987

WASHINGTON—Research administrators in the Soviet Union are joining their counterparts around the world in bringing together university and industrial scientists to encourage commercial applications of basic research. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s repeated calls for perestroyka (restructuring) have reverberated through the Soviet government and bureaucracy and are being heard in the staid halls of the country’s universities. His goal is to make the entire university syst

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Q:Since Prime Minister Thatcher came to power in 1979, her three governments have changed the agenda for political debate in Britain. Has Conservative rule also altered the agenda for science policy? Do you believe that the difficulties now facing U.K. science are simply the outcome of an attempt to save money, or are they the result of a coherent plan? BODMER: Definitely not the latter. Our problems are largely to do with cash and with a monetary policy which says that government expenditure

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The Dangers of Expanding HIV's Host Range

By | November 30, 1987

Scientists attending the Asilomar conference at Pacific Grove, Calif., in February 1975, made history by expressing public concern about the then newly recognized opportunities for splicing DNA artificially from one organism to another. Some possibilities—such as the introduction into the ubiquitous Escherichia coli of genes coding for botulinum toxin—were seen as so risky that they would never even be attempted. But many other fears ventilated at that time have proved to be un-fou

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NEW YORK—Some 20 eminent scientists and a similar number of television news executives will meet to try to bridge the distance between the scientists who make the news and the journalists who broadcast it. The December 12-13 meeting in Tarrytown, N.Y., is the first step in a long-term project made possible by a $876,225 grant to the Scientists Institute for Public Information (SIPI) from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation of Chicago. “I used to call it a gap. Now it

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U. K. Revises Rules on Gene Engineering

By | November 30, 1987

LONDON—British scientists would be required to seek permission for experiments involving genetic manipulation under new regulations proposed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the Advisory Committee on Genetic Manipulation (ACGM). The new rules would modify those adopted in 1978, which dealt exclusively with laboratory work. The proposal would also widen the definition of genetic manipulation to include the direct introduction of recombinant nucleic acid into a cell or organi

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U.K. Backing Lets Celltech Expand Base

By | November 30, 1987

LONDON—For the past 10 years Britain’s Medical Research Council (MRC) has fostered efforts to speed up the transfer of key inventions from academia to industry. Already hard at work on a new collaborative center to open next spring, MRC officials last month were pleased to learn that one of their most promising offspring is ready to grow up. Celitech, founded in 1980 largely with government money, has become the country’s leading inde pendent biotechnology company. The key

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U.S. Toughens Stance On Japan Science Pact

By | November 30, 1987

WASHINGTON—The Reagan administration is asking Japan to participate in a major U.S.-led research project as part of what it hopes will be a tougher bilateral agreement on scientific cooperation. The U.S. proposal has, not been made public, but it is thought to seek Japan’s participation in a large-scale project such as the space station or the Superconducting Supercollider. According to Charles T. Owens, the National Science Foundation’s member of the negotiating team, R

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