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Laying Geology's Groundwork

By | March 21, 1988

TO GEOLOGY The Foundations of a Science, 1650-1830. Rachel Laudan. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987. 278 pp. $27.50. BY JERE H. LIPPS A disparity exists in geology between causal and historical practitioners of the science. Perhaps most geologists aim to decipher the Earth’s history, but an ever-larger number is concerned with the causes of geological phenomena, making them more akin to physicists and chemists than to the British founding geologists typically held in suc

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Letters

By | March 21, 1988

Room for Religion? On the Fast Track Animal Rights M.D.s in the Lab Date: March 21, 1988 The article Salam on Science and World Development” and its accompanying sidebar on science and religion (February 8, 1988, p. 20) struck me as being perfectly reasonable: an outstanding scientist, his belief in the supernatural, and his integration of Islam and physics. However, such an article today about a scientist who is a Christian would probably never appear in THE SCIENTIST, or if i

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N.C. Academy Finds A Policy Niche

By | March 21, 1988

BOSTON—State science academies, which traditionally ply the backwaters of the scientific world, can actually play vital roles in public debates that involve science and technology, according to an environmental policy specialist. The North Carolina Academy of Sciences (NCAS) has shown the way by playing an active role in setting standards for hazardous waste landfills and designing a state regulatory approach to toxic air pollutants, reported Richard N.L. Andrews, director of the Univ

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{WantNoCacheVal} NAS Awards 15 Science Prizes To 18 Individuals. NAS Awards 15 Science Prizes To 18 Individuals. The National Academy of Sciences will present the following awards at Its 125th annual meeting on April 25, Including two new awards in mathematics and the neurosciences. Robert P. Langlands professor of mathematics. The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J.. the NAS award In mathematics; Seymour S. Kety, senior scientist NIMH Intramural Research Program, and Louis

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New Products

March 21, 1988

Designed for loading DNA sequencing samples, the SYPD 3 uL syringe reduces sample contamination. Disposable polycarbonate tips of either 0.34 or 0.19 mm OD prevent sample mixing. Samples do not come in contact with the plunger. The calibrated plunger allows for sample delivery in 0.5-3.0 uL to 0.05 uL increments. The syringe sells for $125. Hoefer Scientific Instruments. NIR Spectrophotometer These fiber optic accessories enhance the versatility of the company’s 6250 near infrared (NI

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NSF Feels Heat On Delayed Centers

By | March 21, 1988

WASHINGTON—The National Science Foundation’s science and technology centers program, intended to be a beacon for collaborative U.S. research that would speed applications to the marketplace, instead has become a lightning rod for criticism from the scientific community. NSF’s decision not to fund any such centers this fiscal year provoked keen disappointment among scientists, especially those who had raced to meet the January 15 deadline. A number of applicants echoed the

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Of Super Tuesday and Superconductivity

By | March 21, 1988

Campaign ‘88 has now passed through the Straits of Super Tuesday. Not all candidates passed in safety. Republican George Bush swamped his opponents, while among the Democrats the field was narrowed considerably, with Michael Dukakis, Albert Gore and Jesse Jackson the apparent survivors. Whoever the eventual nominees for the two parties, the pair should focus their debates, at least in some part, on ways to ensure the effective use of our scientific assets. In our last issue we ran a p

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BOSTON—A Soviet committee created to reduce bureaucracy and increase efficiency within the scientific establishment has received more than 5,000 letters by citizens from all walks of Soviet life. Last month the chairman, Yuri Osipyan (see THE SCIENTIST, January 25, p. 1), carried his message to the annual meeting here of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Osipyan is also director of the Soviet Institute of Solid State Physics. Soviet scientists are eager for more

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. LONDON—The first register of chartered psychologists is being created to emphasize to the public the discipline’s scientific base. The move follows the granting of a Royal Charter to the British Psychological Society, the same status given in recent years to other scientific bodies such as the Institute of Biology. Registration will allow the public, for the first time, to check a psychologist’s credentials; only those registered will be able to use the term “charte

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Revisiting an Intellectual Crossroads

By | March 21, 1988

8p.m. Only two hours late. Not like arriving at 5 a.m. by car from Udine or Venice or somewhere, after winter fog in Milan. The Italian government had hoped that the center would help revive Trieste, once the great port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but in the summer of 1987 it is still off the main air routes. I’m glad to get a lift along the spectacular coast road to the tiny resort of Grignano—but not, this time, to the homely Hotel Mi- gnon. Surprisingly, the luxurious Adria

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