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Happenings

May 18, 1987

Paul J. Fink has been elected president-elect of the American Psychiatric Association. He succeeds George Pollock, who is the new president of the 35,000-member association. Fink is medical director of the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center, chairman of the department of psychiatry at Albert Einstein Medical Center, and professor and deputy chairman of the department of psychiatry at Temple University Health Sciences Center. Kenneth L. Nordtvedt Jr. has been nominated by President Reagan to serve

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How To Keep Up With Chemical Regs

By | May 18, 1987

Both the pace of chemical regulatory change and the pervasiveness of chemical regulation itself have increased dramatically over the past few years. At the same time, keeping track of changing regulatory requirements has become a much more difficult task. This is especially true for small to medium-sized firms, which often face severe budgetary and staff restraints when it comes to regulatory compliance matters. On the other hand, with such sweeping new requirements as the 1986 Superfund Amendme

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Hydrogen

By | May 18, 1987

"The fact [is] that I, a chemist, engaged here in writing my stories about chemistry, have lived a different season." For Primo Levi that "different season" was a place called Auschwitz. An assimilated Italian Jew, Levi quit his job at a pharmaceutical factory, joined a band of anti-fascist partisans, was betrayed and captured. At Auschwitz, he was skilled prisoner 17451Z forced to work in a chemical lab adjacent to the Nazi death camp. In 1947 he began writing a series of autobiographical work

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India's Scientists Seek Better Pay, More Perks

By | May 18, 1987

NEW DELHI—Scientists in India's government laboratories, unhappy over receiving proportionately less money than other civil servants, are calling for salary increases and more perks. Leading the drive are the associations of scientific workers of India's autonomous research councils: the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, the Indian Council of Medical Research and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research. The extent of the dissatisfaction became evident earlier this spring

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Kapitza: Popularizing Science on Soviet TV

By | May 18, 1987

Through his activities as a science educator and popularizer, experimental physicist Sergei P Kapitza has become one of the best-known scientists in the Soviet Union. Millions of people watch his biweekly television show on scientific issues, for which he received the State Award in 1980. Kapitza was born in England, where his father, Peter L. Kapitza, was working on low-temperature physics and magnetism at Cam bridge. After graduating from the Moscow Aeronautical Institute in 1949, Sergei Kapi

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Letters

May 18, 1987

Regarding Jeffrey Mervis' article "Many Questions, Few Answers on New NSF Science Centers" (THE SCIENTIST, March 23, 1987, p. 1), I'd like to ask a question or two myself. Does the right hand know what the left hand is doing? Why are we overlooking the fact that the NSF's Industry-University Co operative Research Center Program (IUCR) is an excellent model for the Science and Technology Centers? Why is Mervis raising concerns that have been answered in the course of the 10 years or so that the

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Making a Molehill Out of Mount Everest

By | May 18, 1987

When I was growing up, there were perhaps only three facts of geography I knew for sure: the equator was exactly 25,000 miles long, heaven was located just above the Van Allen radiation belt, and Mount Everest was the highest mountain in the world. These were scientific facts of the first order, known to all parochial school children, and inculcated through repetition and regular use of the chart and pointer by Sister Mary Geography. It is a sign of the faithless age in which we live that no o

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Manipulating Genetic Research

By | May 18, 1987

The Politics of Uncertainty: Regulating Recombinant DNA Research in Britain. David Bennett, Peter Glasner and David Travis. Routledge & Kegan Paul, Boston, 1986. 218 pp. $35. The history of science and technology should give us perspective on the context of scientific and technological development and provide us with lessons for the future when, as is usually the case, we again face similar questions. In this volume three authors—David Bennett, a molecular biologist/sociologist and Peter G

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More Than a History of the Bomb

By | May 18, 1987

The Making of the Atomic Bomb. Rlchard Rhodes. Simon and Shuster, New York, 1986. 788 pp. $22.95. This book is much more than a history of the atomic bomb. It is the story of the scientists who discovered that atoms consisted of nuclei and electrons, that atomic phenomena are quantized, and eventually that energy could be derived by splitting the heaviest nuclei. The author presents the scientists as real people with curiosity, imagination and fears in the turbulent years from the turn of the c

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Needed: Information on Technology's Impact

By | May 18, 1987

The watchword in Washington and the rest of the United States is competitiveness. There have been more discussions by more people about America's ability (or inability) to compete internationally than perhaps about any other topic this year. And with each announcement of further erosion in the U.S. balance of payments, the intensity of that discussion escalates. The problem has been at least two decades in the making. American industry did not modernize its manufacturing processes soon enough.

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