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By | January 11, 1988

Textbook Errors, by Stanley Kirschner Pigs in Space, by Charles Ditlow Archaeopteryx Arguments, by Fred Hoyle Japan and The United States , by Kenneth M. Matsumura I would like to comment on "Let's Put an End to Textbook Nonsense" (November 30, 1987, p. 11) by Stephen J. Hawkes. Basically, Hawkes is right. We should make a determined effort to put an end to textbook errors. Hawkes also points out that it is no easy matter to correct errors-even well- known ones-in textbooks, and he cite

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Lust on Europe's Space Plans

January 11, 1988

The development of the free-flyer will give us expertise in many areas, including control over our own low-gravity materials processing studies and in the various areas of robotics which will be involved in helping maintain and service parts of the platform. In general, Europe will have more freedom than if it had only the attached module. DEPENDENCE ON PUBLIC MONEY Q: Would you explain the rationale behind putting large sums of money from governments, rather than from the private sector, int

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New Products

January 11, 1988

LabTrak Schedule-Manager is a software program that provides automated personnel scheduling for hospital, industrial, pharmaceutical, biomedical and reference laboratories. The date files accept information on job types, employees and companywide holidays. The program then accesses these data to assign qualified personnel for each job and to coordinate employee days off and vacations. The program can also automatically rotate personnel according to their skills and the company's needs. The Sc

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NSF Pushed To Open Up Peer Review

By | January 11, 1988

Agres is assitant managing editor of The Washington Times

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Scientists as Temporaries

By | January 11, 1988

In the past few years, this type of headline has begun to appear more and more frequently Why? In times more economically secure than these-before Gramm-Rudman, the volatile stock market, dramatic takeovers, and increased shareholder awareness-a company set out to do a job, hired staff and hoped to be successful. If, along the way, the company experienced sudden growth, it hired to accommodate the new orders. When business slowed, it laid people off. What companies attempted to do on a large s

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So They Say

January 11, 1988

The Tourist Trade Prince Charles to The Rescue? Conflicts of Interest In Pursuit of Truth Problems In Portugal Is Chemistry a Dirty Word? Crushing Our Conservative Shell Doing Nothing and Lying About It R.R. Was Here A Welcome and Exciting Change A Plea from Jane Goodall Superconducting Supercollider: Not a Now or Never Decision Practitioners Are Not Just Slow Scientists The Glamour Factor As I see it, enterprising scientists will have to resort to the tourist trade like everyone [in Bri

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Soviets Seek West's Help on AIDS

By | January 11, 1988

WASHINGTON--Two years ago Soviet officials were in the midst of a vigorous international campaign of disinformation about the U.S. Army's supposed role in the spread of AIDS. This week top officials from the American and Soviet national academies of science and medicine are scheduled to meet in Moscow to discuss cooperative scientific ventures between the two countries, including possible collaboration on immunological and vaccine research that could help in the fight against AIDS. It is too

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States Luring Scientists With Salaries, Facilities

By | January 11, 1988

Although such appropriations and bond issues promise to foster excellence throughout the state, the primary beneficiaries of much pump priming are usually state colleges and universities. These efforts, in turn, have triggered recruitment wars between established research institutions and newer programs trying to join the top echelon. The bidding is particularly fierce in such fields as ceramics, computers, chemical engineering and all aspects of biotechnology. And although higher salaries alo

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The Cost of a Fortress Science Mentality

By | January 11, 1988

Our titanic national debt will eventually force hard decisions. Science funding will not be exempted. When that time comes, a public that has heard from the scientific community about why its work is valuable will more likely support science than one that hasn't. We cannot expect the public to respond positively if we have not told them our story. We can only do so through the media. Molecular biologist Bryan Sykes of Oxford University recently spent seven weeks working for a British televis

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The Cost of a Fortress Science Mentality

By | January 11, 1988

Our titanic national debt will eventually force hard decisions. Science funding will not be exempted. When that time comes, a public that has heard from the scientific community about why its work is valuable will more likely support science than one that hasn't. We cannot expect the public to respond positively if we have not told them our story. We can only do so through the media. Molecular biologist Bryan Sykes of Oxford University recently spent seven weeks working for a British televis

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