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The Fuchs Case: Can Secrecy in Science Work?

By | January 11, 1988

Today much information has recently become available, including U.S. Atomic Energy Commission files and FBI files on Fuchs' statements and on his and Gold's confessions, as well as memoirs published by Fuchs' communist associates in England. From these and other sources it is clear that many aspects of the case were kept from the public in order to conceal important political secrets, not just atomic ones. One political secret was how Fuchs' spying was discovered in the first place. We now kno

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The Pluses and Minuses of TeX

By | January 11, 1988

For one thing, no computer is as natural as pencil and paper. Placing a word in a certain location, writing in big letters or changing to script or Greek can be done almost without thinking when using a pencil, but all these actions require explicit commands when using a keyboard. It's difficult to build a system with easy-to-remember commands, in large part because ease of use depends upon personal preference. For many people, typing "center," or the command "ce" to center a line is easier tha

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Two All-in-One Programs for the Mac

By | January 11, 1988

MACTeX Version 2.0 FTL Systems Inc. 234 Eglinton Avenue East Suite 205 Toronto, Ontario Canada. M4P I K5 (416) 487-2142 Requirements: MacPlus, Mac SE or Mac II. Hard disk highly recommended. Printer support: Apple Laserwriter Laserwriter Plus and any PostScript based printing device. Documentation: Comes with its own 110-page manual. TeXbook and LaTeX Price: $750 TeXtures Version 1.0 Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. 6 Jacob Way Reading, MA 01867 (617) 944-6795 RequIrements: Runs on Mac 512,

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Two U.K. Trade Unions Merge, Seek Growth Among Scientists

By | January 11, 1988

LONDON-A major new trade union has emerged in Britain with the goal of organizing skilled workers in the new technologies. With trade union membership falling, the new organization, known as Manufacturing, Science and Finance (MSF), hopes to extend the frontiers of organized labor into areas where recruitment has been difficult. Its co-leaders, Clive Jenkins and Ken Gill, are confident that the new union can establish its identity quickly. MSF is the product of the merger of two medium-sized

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STOCKHOLM--The Nobel Foundation plans to sell stock in a new firm being formed to preserve the value of the annual prizes it awards.. . . This year's prizes.. . will each be worth $340,000... . Shrewd investments in the past decade. . . have reversed years of declining value for the prizes, and have raised the foundation's assets to near the real value of the original estate in 1900. --From THE SCIENTIST October 5, 1987, p.4. Lend an ear to hear the story of my galloping success. I was onc

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A New Excuse for the Flubbed Shot

By | December 14, 1987

TENNIS SCIENCE FOR TENNIS PLAYERS Howard Brody. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 1987. 168 pp. $14.95. Every tennis player now has a new excuse for the flubbed shot: the laws of nature. Tennis existed before Newton but his laws determine the motion of a " tennis ball just as they do the motion of the planets. Tennis is as much a game of string tension, ball trajectories and coefficients of compression and restitution as it is a game of watching the ball, bending knees and swin

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An Academician's Arsenal

By | December 14, 1987

NATIONAL SECURITY CONTROLS AND UNIVERSITY RESEARCH Information for Investigators and Administrators. Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C., 1987. 13 pp. Free. Selected Readings. 116 pp. Free. Statutes Regulations and Policy Statements. 225 pp. Out of stock but copies are available at most major institutions. National security control over scientific and technical information is characterized by the competing demands of national defense and academia’s freedom to com

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Biologist Urges Support For Saving the Tropics

By | December 14, 1987

SANTA ROSA NATIONAL PARK, COSTA RICA—Biologists must join the fight to save tropical species or face the loss within a generation of the edifice upon which bioscience is built, says an eminent tropical ecologist. “Many, many scientists don’t understand that if they’re not out there proselytizing for the maintenance, development and actual preservation of the systems they work on, some competitive force is going to take it away from them,” said Daniel Janzen, a

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Cuts Threaten Basic Research In Australia

By | December 14, 1987

SYDNEY—The Australian government’s increasingly pragmatic attitude toward academic research has dismayed many scientists here and reinforced their feeling that the universities’ central activities are under assault. Their concerns recently have focused on the Australian Research Grants Scheme (ARGS), the annual round of competitive grants for scientists and others at the country’s 20 universities. Total funding under ARGS for 1988 is $32.3 million Australian ($22 milli

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D

By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—It’s hard to escape the dominance of Japan in worldwide technology, even if the subject is France. Gallic pride took a beating when its government asked American research administrators for their views on French technology. The U.S. executives said that France provides the United States with its stiffest competition in only two. categories—nuclear energy and aeronautics. The Japanese came out on top in a majority of the 11 categories, covering automobiles, comput

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