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WASHINGTON - Well paying graduate fellowships are needed to attract more American-born engineering students, according to a new report from the National Research Council. The report tackles the controversial issue of the growing presence of foreign-born engineers in U.S. universities, both as students and faculty, and the parallel drop in the number of Americans pursuing advanced degrees in the field. Its subtitle, "Infusing Talent, Raising Issues," emphasizes its decision to avoid racial or e

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Happenings

February 8, 1988

NEW PUBLICATIONS Engineering Optics an Institute of Physics reprint journal that contains applied and engineering optics papers previously published in IOP journals, debuts this month The quarterly journal covers papers on fiber optics; optical communications, Integrated Optics optical sensors, lasers and displays and optical systems design. Charter two-year subscription rates are $56 (25 pounds U.K., 32 pounds overseas); personal subscriptions are $28 per year (12.50 pounds U.K., 16 pounds ov

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Happenings

February 8, 1988

PEOPLE AWARDS DEATHS OPPORTUNITIES ECETERA MEETINGS Richard J. Gowen, president of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology became 1988 chairman of the American Association of Engineering Societies on January 1. John W. Ahien, president and chief executive officer of the Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, director of the Arkansas Capital Corp. and Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton's science adviser, was elected chairman of the AAES public affairs council, and Delon Hampton,

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Japanese May Invite 300 Into Labs WASHINGTON - Japan, under pressure to open its labs to outsiders, may soon be inviting more than 300 additional foreign researchers, under programs approved last month by the nation's Finance Ministry. During a visit here last month, Prime Minister Noboru Takeashita offered $4.4 million to help finance long-term visits by U.S. scientists to Japan's government university and industrial labs. He suggested that the National Science Foundation pick the recipients.

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Law Sets Up Nonmilitary Data Rules

By | February 8, 1988

Volume 2, #3The Scientist February 08, 1988 Law Sets Nonmilitary Data Rules AUTHOR:TED AGRES Date: FEBRUARY 08, 1988 Washington - A new law gives a civilian agency the authority to set standards on access to unclassified data, including scientific and technical information. The law ends a long debate over how to protect certain types of computerized data and wrests control of such decisions from the military. "We're very pleased," said Kenneth B. Allen, senior vice president

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Letters

By | February 8, 1988

Human Subjects I read with interest the Ex Libris article "Doing Research on People" (November 16, 1987, p. 23) by Ruth Macklin. I was very disappointed by the tone and approach she took. Perhaps some of this suffered from the space limitations in which she was forced to work, and I hope to one day read the book. However, the article is all that many people may get to see. Since she has a very important and visible role in a major medical college, herr attitudes undoubtedly will influence oth

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Letters

February 8, 1988

A SERIOUS MISTAKE HUMAN SUBJECTS MACKLIN REPLIES Elisabeth Carpenter's article "Police Are Slow to Probe Attacks on Animal Labs" (December 14, 1987, p. 1), describes and il ustrates in vivid detail raids on laboratories by opponents of animal experimentation. We oppose destruction of property and have consistently sought to prevent mistreatment of animals through education and law enforcement. It is unfortunate that the article makes only a passing reference to the conditions that hav

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New Products

February 8, 1988

The Videomex-V video image analyzer combines sophisticated hard ware and software, enabling users to track multiple animals with a single television camera. The user can adjust for the sizes of objects to be monitored and the areas in which they move. This system is adaptable for measuring the activity of microscopic parasites as well as the movement of large animals. With the help of a microprocessor, the Videomex-V activity analyzer can acquire and process images 30 times/second, either dire

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NIH Scientists Seek Animal Patents

By | February 8, 1988

NEWS NIH Scientists Seek Animal Patents Author:JEFFREY PORRO Date: FEBRUARY 08, 1988 Japanese May Invite 300 Into Labs WASHINGTON - Japan, under pressure to open its labs to outsiders, may soon be inviting more than 300 additional foreign researchers, under programs approaved last month by the nation's Finance Ministry. During a visit here last month, Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita offered $4.4 million to help finance long-term visits by U.S. Scientists to Japan's government, univers

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Not Just English Spoken Here

By | February 8, 1988

Maier-Leibnitz is emeritus professor of physics at the Technical University Munich. His address is Pienzenauerstrasse 110, 8000 Munich 81, West Germany Based on an article in the Summer-Autumn 1986 issue of Minerva A Review of Science, Learning and Policy. See also "English Spoken Here," THE SCIENTIST,September 7, 1987, p. 9.

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