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Diplomats Strive for Scientific Literacy

By | September 21, 1987

WASHINGTON—In many areas of science or technology—from climate changes to new manufacturing technology—the lines between science and foreign policy blur and sometimes disappear. “Things that used to be domestic aren’t any more,” said Robert W. Rycroft, deputy director of the graduate program in science, technology and public policy at George Washington University and an associate professor of public affairs and political science. “There are severe i

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Forthcoming Books

September 21, 1987

BIOLOGY Annual Review of Phytopathology. R James Cook, ed. Annual Reviews: September, 460 pp, $31. A collection of original scientific papers that cover all aspects of phytopathology; includes “Historical Perspectives,” “Development of Concepts,” and “Biological and Cultural Control.” Crows of the World. Second Edition. Derek Goodwin. Univ. of Washington Press: September 25, 300 pp, $45. Discusses all aspects of crows including their appearance, biology, b

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Germanys Sign Science Pact

September 21, 1987

WEST BERLIN—West and East Germany have agreed to pursue more than two dozen scientific and technological projects as part of a joint agreement signed last week. The announcement was made on the occasion of the first visit to Bonn by East German General Secretary Erich Honecker The agreement comes after 34 rounds of negotiations in the 15 years since the two countries first established formal relationships. A panel of government officials and scientists from each country will be create

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Glaxo to Pursue Work of Biogen Lab

By | September 21, 1987

ZURICH—Officials at Glaxo, the British pharmaceutical giant that has agreed to purchase the Geneva research laboratory of Biogen N.Y., have promised that the facility will retain a degree of autonomy as an intemational center of excellence in biotechnology. John Barr, a spokesman for Glaxo, said that the laboratory will be integrated into the company’s general research program and renamed the Glaxo Institute for Molecular Biology. The new director of research will be Allan Will

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Happenings

September 21, 1987

PEOPLE William R. Brody, chairman of Resonex Inc., a manufacturer of magnetic resonance imaging devices, has been named professor and director of the department of radiology and radiological science at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. In 1984, Brody founded Resonex Inc. after spending six years with the department of radiology and electrical engineering at Stanford University. This month, he will assume the responsibilities of Martin W. Donner, who has held the post at Johns Hopkins sin

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HHMI Expands Under New President

By | September 21, 1987

WASHINGTON—The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) next month will announce a $40 million-a-year program ranging from support for graduate training in the biomedical sciences to funding of health policy and cost-containment studies. Purnell Choppin, HHMI’s former vice president and chief scientific officer who was appointed president of the institute on September 1, said the education prograin will include funds to upgrade science departments at undergraduate colleges and sup

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In Chernobyl's Sarcophagus

By | September 21, 1987

The first reporter on the scene of the Chernobyl accident in late April 1986 was Vladimir Gubaryev, science editor of Pravda, the Communist Party newspaper in the Soviet Union. An engineer by training, Gubaryev had covered science for the paper for 10 years while also writing plays and a score of books. His experience at Chernobyl prompted him to write the play Sarcophagus, first published in the September 1986 issue of the Soviet literary journal Znamya (“The Banner”). The play is

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Jorge Rocca is not your average Presidential Young Investigator. Unlike the majority of his colleagues, he says the award was ‘‘a big factor’’ in his decision to remain in academia. ‘‘We like what we do,’’ he said about young researchers who have begun to build a record of achievement. ‘‘But the award strongly biases you to stay and make good use of the money." Rocca, who is using part of his PYI money to build short-wavelength laser

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Letters

By | September 21, 1987

DeBakey Never Replied In the July 27, 1987 issue (p. 1) Michael DeBakey denies my findings of “overcrowding of animals and improper supervision” in the animal care laboratories under his jurisdiction. He claims I “obviously [have] a convenient memory” and, according to the article, says I was “pleased by the conditions and about the high quality of the facility.” This is not the first time that DeBakey has called me a liar in the press. To keep the record s

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Medicine's Scientific Prescription

By | September 21, 1987

THE DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN PHYSIOLOGY Scientific Medicine in the Nineteenth Century. W. Bruce Fye. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1987. 308 pp. $35. The centennial of the American Physiological Society in 1987 has stimulated the publication of several books, some that were in preparation independently and others engendered specifically by the occasion. This excellent volume tracing the origins of the scientific approach to medical training and practice falls into the forme

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