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By | March 7, 1988

Euro-Science News Lab Break-Ins Gene Sequencing IEEE’s Voting Rules Bernard Dixon’s short Opinion piece “Why Does the U.S. Neglect Euro-Science” (January 25, 1988, p. 11) on the asymmetry between U.S. and European mass media coverage of science neglects one of the made by Harrois-Monin in her original article. That point is that the proportionate coverage of European science by U.S. periodicals is a matter of editorial policy and practice. American journalist

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Luck in the Lab Helped My Career

By | March 7, 1988

My scientific career has been helped along by two marvelous instances of good luck. The first occurred while I was a research student in chemistry at Leeds University where my supervisor was Prof. R. Whytlaw-Gray, the leader of a distinguished school for the measurement of atomic weights. His method depended on the use of a very delicate microbalance to determine the vapor densities of substances in their dilute gaseous states. The problem he gave me was to obtain a new and more precise va

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Mr. President, What About...?

By | March 7, 1988

Boston-Scientists who advise the president face a dilemma. Their advice must remain confidential if it is to be useful. Yet their authority ultimately is derived from public acceptance of their technical expertise. Last month, at the annual meeting here of the Amencan Association for the Advancement of Science, a distinguished panel of past and present science advisers discussed how best to advise the president. Although the day-long symposium was spawned by the frustration and disappointment

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Editor’s note: February was a key month for the proposed project to map and sequence the human genome. The National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences issued its report “Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome,” which sounds a strong call for an immediate, largescale program. Meanwhile, David Baltimorebiologist, devoted part of his keynote address at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science to a cautionary note regarding t

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NASA Pushes Two New Programs

By | March 7, 1988

Overall research and development accounts for $4.4 billion of the NASA budget request, up 33 percent from this year’s $3.3 billion. The largest share is the $967 million sought for the space station, which received $392 million this year. Other features of the NASA budget request were an increase from $52 million to $84 million for NASA’s participation in the transatmospheric research for the hypersonic aerospace plane project, and a five-fold increase, from $20 million to $102 mil

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New Products

March 7, 1988

The Immu-Mark Chlamydia kit is an indirect test for chlamydia infection that detects IgG and IgA anti-Chlamydia antibodies. These antibodies have been used as markers to distinguish between active infection, a carrier state and a negative result. The stabilized reagents require no reconstitution or dilution. The test requires only a light microscope, and results are available within two to three hours. ICN Biomedicals. The Kjel-FAST 6-minute microwave Kjeldahl digestion system incorporates

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No Action Seen After Hearing On Policy Office

By | March 7, 1988

WASHINGTON-Congress has several options to strengthen the effectiveness of the White House science adviser and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). But a hearing last month, more tame than some had expected, made clear that no changes are contemplated before the next president takes office. Part of the perception of weakness was attributed to the relatively low profile of the current adviser, William R. Graham; OSTP's modest budget of less than $2 million, and its small staff o

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NSF Pitches 5-Year Funding For Centers

By | March 7, 1988

WASHINGTON—NSF Director Erich Bloch has thrown Congress a curveball in the hope that legislators won’t knock his request for a 19 percent budget increase out of the ballpark. Bloch's 1989 budget contains a new pitch to salvage his plan for a dozen or more university-based science and technology centers. It requests $150 million up front—nearly half of the overall $333 million increase sought by NSF—for a five-year program that would be isolated from the foundationR

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OECD Developing Guidelines For Cooperation in Science

By | March 7, 1988

PARIS- U.S. proposal to resolve imbalances in scientific cooperation among nations may be adopted as early as this spring by science ministers from the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. The organization’s Committee for Scientific and Technological Policy meets later this month to review the latest draft of a proposal put forth last fall by White House science adviser William Graham. U.S. officials believe that such common principles of scientific cooperation can als

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Panel Backs Journal Retractions

By | March 7, 1988

{WantNoCacheVal} Panel Backs Journal Retractions Medical journals should print retractions of questioned or fraudulent research even if the lead author or co-authors have not submitted or approved such statements said a top official of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. "Journal editors have a responsibility to keep the scientific record clear," said Edward J. Huth, a physician and North American coordinator for the international committee. Last month the group published

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