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Entrepreneur Briefs

May 30, 1988

Are the special sparks of creativity and do-it-yourself vigor that are the hallmarks of entrepreneurship something that can be learned in a classroom? Increasingly, scientists are teaching scientists the art and business of new commercial ventures. At Northwestern, for example, students with science and engineering backgrounds compose one-third of the classes taught by physicist and business professor Stuart Meyer in the Kellogg School of Management. And at Cornell, former physicist and Genera

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Fusion Progress Report: A Milestone Achieved

By | May 30, 1988

If only we could produce fusion power in a controlled way, we would possess a virtually limitless supply of relatively clean and safe energy. Fusion represents the best hope humanity possesses to solve the problems of feeding, housing, and caring for the billions of additional people expected to populate our world in the next century. The problem for fusion researchers has been how to tame this most basic form of energy in the universe. Our sun and all other stars are fueled by fusion reactions

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Government Briefs

May 30, 1988

For the second time in three years, the Presidential Young investigator Awards program has been scaled back. Because of NSF’s tight budget only 148 scientists of the planned 200 were selected. In 1986 only half of the scheduled 200 were funded. The five-year-old federal effort is designed to keep new Ph.D.s from leaving academia for industry by providing them with up to $37,500 annually, for five years, as well as an annual $25,000 Stipend. The catch is that these are matching funds, and

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Fun And Profit In The Skin Trade From deep biology to Epidermis Inc., another tale in the merchandising of science CAMBRIDGE, MASS--Jeff Morgan and Brad Guild moved into their new office on the opening day of baseball season this April. The space was small: a single room with built-in desks lining opposite walls and barely enough room to swivel their chairs. The pair stacked boxes and unpacked a few books. And Guild took up a blue magic marker and scrawled the business’s first official

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Hot Papers

May 30, 1988

The articles listed below—all less than a year old, have received a substantially greater number of citations than those in the same subject area and of the same vintage. A citation-tracking algorithm of the Institute for Scientific Information has identified these articles. U. Amaldi, A. Böhm L.S. Durkin, P. Langacker, A.K. Mann, et al., "Comprehensive analysis of data pertaining to the weak neutral current and the intermediate-vector-boson masses," Physical Review D -Particles a

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Independent Lab Briefs

May 30, 1988

Deep Sea Vents Overshadow manic John H. Steele, director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for the past 10 years, has announced that he will resign next year. Steele presided over the venerable institution during a headline-grabbing era, in which Woods Hole scientists ventured into the ocean depths to discover strange forms of life and spy on the remains of the Titanic. But the most important find during his tenure, Steele says, "was the discovery of hydrothermal vents in the Pacific.

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Industry Briefs

May 30, 1988

Three Japanese behemoths led the list of companies receiving the most U.S. patents in 1987. Canon K.K., Hitachi Ltd., and Toshiba together received more patents (2,515) than General Electric Co., IBM Corp., and RCA Corp. (1,874), according to a study by Intellectual Property Owners. The Japanese also raced to a commanding lead in the auto industry, where Mitsubishi, Honda, and Toyota each chalked up more patents than the U.S. leader, General Motors. All told, 29 Japanese companies appear amon

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Kodak, The ‘Great Yellow Father,’ AUTHOR: MATT DAMSKER Date: May 30, 1988 Is Innovating Like A Newborn To young scientists, it’s yuppie paradise; to the veterans, a mixed blessing ROCHESTER, N.Y—The old Kodak is still in evidence here. Downtown, the dignified brown skyscraper lords the familiar logo over Rochester as it has for more than half a century. A few miles to the north, there’s the company’s sprawling scientific complex, Kodak Park, and, at its hu

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Letters

May 30, 1988

LETTERS Date: May 30, 1988 Too Many Papers I would like to express my enthusiastic agreement with the letter from Jeanne F. Loring (May 2, 1988, p. 9). All my colleagues and I are troubled by the rapidly increasing number of articles we’d like to read. As Loring points out, simply scanning the titles of potentially interesting articles in potentially interesting journals can no longer be done in a satisfactory way. Like Loring, I know scientists who publish 50 or more (in some cases over

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THE CONQUEST OF THE MICROCHIP Hans Queisser Harvard University Press; Cambridge; 185 pages; $24.95 Thoughtful U.S. scientists might wonder why Europe lags so far behind in microelectronics. Hans Queisser, director of the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, West Germany, offers a precise explanation: "The significance of silicon was underestimated, the economic miracle of post-World War II reconstruction was based on conventional industry, and public and government prior

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