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Museum's High Hopes

By | September 7, 1987

ITHACA, N.Y.—The new director of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., hopes to expand its research efforts and use its exhibits to further public understanding of science and technology. Cornell astronomer and astrophysicist Martin 0. Harwit last month took charge of one of the most-visited museums in the world, with an estimated 9 million visitors annually. It houses exhibits ranging from the Wright Brothers’ first aircraft to the Apollo 11 command module and

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NASA Official Hopeful

By | September 7, 1987

WASHINGTON—The pam of the present will eventually lead to longterm gains for space scientists if NASA’s budget continues to grow, says Lennard A. Fisk, the agency’s new associate administrator for space science and applications. “NASA has essentially been directed by the president to go back to its R&D roots, and that will do well for science and applications,” Fisk told THE SCIENTIST in one of his first interviews since taking the position in April. “If I

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Sir Francis Graham-Smith, Astronomer Royal and director of Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratory, for his contributions to radio and optical astronomy. Sir Eric Denton, secretary of the Marine Biological Association, for his contributions to the physiology of marine animals, to marine biology in general, and his leadership of U.K. marine science. G.V.R. Born, Emeritus Professor of Pharmacology, University of London, Kings College, to honor his many contributions to the physiology, pathology and

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Rules on Embryos Proposed

By | September 7, 1987

MADRID—The Council of Europe, seeking a common framework for legislation regulating experiments on human embryos in its 21 member nations, is considering a new report by a Spanish physician on the ethics and biology of such research. In his report, Marcelo Palacios, a Socialist member of Spain’s parliament, endorses the increasingly accepted view that a fertilized human egg becomes an embryo 14 days after conception. The pre-embryo, he suggests, could be used for experimentation&

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Science Trust Fund Urged

By | September 7, 1987

WASHINGTON—A proposal to use the commercial fruits of federally funded research to finance new projects may get a hearing this fall in Congress. Although its passage is unlikely, the idea is seen as an innovative approach to funding R&D at a time when there is little room in the federal budget for new research programs. A bill (S. 1302) introduced May 29 by Sen. James Exon (D-Neb.) would create a technology trust fund with royalties from the sale of products that originated in federally

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WASHINGTON—The 142-year-old Scientific American has undergone a facelift to make its contents more attractive to a wider audience. The September issue of the magazine contains numerous changes in graphics, typography and organization, according to Editor Jonathan Piel. Piel said the new design continues a trend toward shorter, easier-to-read articles and columns and more compelling illustrations and photographs that began when he became editor in 1984 and has continued under its new own

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Secrets of Sci-Sales Success

By | September 7, 1987

SCI-TECH SELLING Selling Scientific and Technical Products and Services. Michael P. Wynne. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1987. 250 pp. $24.95. This catchy title refers to a broad range of scientific and industrial products and services, and the book is aimed at the people who sell them. Michael Wynne, an interna- tional management consultant, offers advice on the various stages of the sales process: making contacts, identifying and offering solutions to customers’ problems, clos

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So They Say

September 7, 1987

Gallo: On Center Stage There are those out there who despise Dr. Robert Gallo. He discovered the cause of AIDS and is now at work on a vaccine, and yet he needs only to open his mail or make a trip, and there they are, the bizarre accusations, the flashes of hatred. ... More respected critics—indeed, some of his colleagues—have. faulted Gallo for his behavior during a two-year-long dispute with French research scientist Luc Montagnier over who could claim credit for identifying th

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T Centers

September 7, 1987

WASHINGTON—Universities have until January 15 to submit proposals for the first year of NSF’s new $30 million science and technology centers program. The program was created to allow scientists from several disciplines to work together on projects involving basic research questions that are expected eventually to have commercial applications. The centers, although based at individual universities, are expected to receive support from state and local governments, federal laboratori

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Technical Data Defined

September 7, 1987

The two definitions of technical data in the respective sets of regulations are: " “Information of any kind that can be used, or adapted for use in the design, production, manufacture, utilization, or reconstruction of articles or materials. The data may take a tangible form, such as a model, prototype, blueprint, or an operating model; or they may take an intangible form such as technical service.” (EAR). " “Information which is directly related to the design, engineering,

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