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Forthcoming Books

May 4, 1987

This list of forthcoming books has been compiled from the latest information available from publishers. Dates of publication, prices and numbers of pages are tentative, however, and are subject to change. Biological Science DNA: Protein interactions and Gene Regulation. E. Brad Thompson and John Papaconstantinou, eds. University of Texas Press: May, 296 pp, $32.50. Discusses protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions involved in the regulation of informational macromolecules in both eukaryotic and

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Furor on Technical Schools

By | May 4, 1987

LONDON—One of Britain's leading retail electronics companies has thrown its weight behind a Thatcher government educational scheme to reverse inner-city decay and increase scientific and technical training in high schools. The plan, which establishes City Technology Colleges (CTC), has generated considerable controversy since its announcement at the Tory party conference last October. The government has admitted that it has not discussed the matter formally with teachers, administrators or

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GAO Calls for Fresh Look at Science Funding

By | May 4, 1987

WASHINGTON—The congressional General Accounting Office, in a major overview of U.S. science policy, has urged the Reagan administration to re-examine its priorities and methods for funding research. The GAO report, dated March 25, also questions the bureaucratic mechanisms surrounding the annual federal budget process and the "institutional framework" used by the executive branch to set national science policies. The study was begun as an internal review of the subject, but GAO officials d

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Happenings

May 4, 1987

Robert M. White has been reelected to a second four-year term as president of the National Academy of Engineering. Before being elected president of the 1,300-member academy in 1983, White served as president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, a consortium of 50 universities with research programs in atmospheric sciences and technology. White is a recognized expert in meteorology and oceanography and served as the first administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric A

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How Geology Miscast Its Most Important People

By | May 4, 1987

Time's Arrow, Time's Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time. Stephen Jay Gould, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1987. 219 pp. $17.50. Spring comes and spring goes, and comes once again—"Time's Cycle." Each spring is unique, and so is marked—"Time's Arrow." Our experience with time is of cycles and of arrows, yet they interweave and confuse. Neither is right, neither is wrong. We accept them, and we overlook them. Geological time, its enormousness and h

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Improper Instrument for Criticizing Science

By | May 4, 1987

Science as Politics. Les Levidow, ed. Free Association Books, London, 1986. 180 pp. £5.95. The last 20 years have seen the flowering of literally dozens of different political critiques of science and technology. The majority have had their roots in the late-1960s movement for social responsibility in science. Most have been broadly left of the political center, and most (but not all, as the continuing strength of the environmental movement amply testifies) have had almost no discernible in

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Level VAT Sought on Books

By | May 4, 1987

LONDON—A proposal to make the Value Added Tax (VAT) more uniform throughout the European Economic Community could significantly increase the prices worldwide of British scientific books and Journals. The EEC, which is considering a variety of reforms to boost its revenue and simplify its finances, has singled out the United Kingdom and Ireland because important areas of retail spending here—including books, food and children's clothing—are not subject to VAT. The European Com

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Marie Curie and Her Contemporaries

By | May 4, 1987

Marie Curie: A Life.Françoise Giroud. Translated by Lydia Davis. Holmes & Meier, New York, 1986. 287 pp. $34.50. This book—an English translation of a version written by Françoise Giroud, a columnist for Le Nouvel Observateur—provides interesting and illuminating insights into the lives and work of Marie Curie, her husband Pierre and their scientific friends and contemporaries. For this reason alone it is to be highly commended. It is of great interest to read between the

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Mukaibo on Japan's International Cooperation

By | May 4, 1987

Takashi Mukaibo, deputy chairman of Japan's Atomic Energy Commission, has long been involved in international science policy. Trained as a chemical engineer, Mukaibo in 1954-58 was the first postwar science attaché at the Japanese Embassy in Washington. He served on the United Nations Advisory Commission on the Application of Science and Technology for Development from 1971 to 1980, and was vice chairman of the Japan National Commission for UNESCO in 1974-76. For the past few years he has b

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NIH's Newest Institute Gearing Up

By | May 4, 1987

WASHINGTON—Two and a half years after a presidential veto of the concept, Lawrence Shulman is taking charge as director of the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). "There's a lot to do," said Shulman about the 12th and newest institute on the NIH campus, carved out of an existing institute after Congress voted in 1985 to override the Reagan veto. "And Congress has told us to do it." Shulman, 67, joined the NIH a decade ago from Johns Hopkins Univers

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