Magazine

Most Recent

Recognizing the Role of Chance

By | May 2, 1988

Las Vegas is perhaps not the first city that comes to mind when one thinks of a meeting place for scientists. Yet that is where the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) is holding its annual convention this week. Upon reflection, however, it seemed more appropriate than I had first thought for scientists to gather in a city that epitomizes chance and the good fortune it sometimes brings. The vision I held of gaming tables, roulette wheels and one-armed bandits put

0 Comments

So They Say

May 2, 1988

History Policies dominated by overreaction threaten to build walls around sick people and victimize them, and even the most robust democracy may not be strong enough to withstand such divisive forces. But knowledge brings with it the power to escape from the crippling stance of past generations, who were condemned to cower in ignorance be- fore the Black Plague or the invisible menace of yellow fever. The challenge is not merely to learn from history, but especially to cull the pertinent messa

0 Comments

Some LEAP at Chance to Forge Teams

By | May 2, 1988

SANTA FE, N.M--Jumping from a 165-foot cliff wasn’t in their job descriptions. So there was some grumbling when Hewlett-Packard lab director Frank Carrubba asked 20 of his scientists to attend an “adventure-learning” program in the wilds of New Mexico. One year later, the Palo Alto, Calif., researchers talk fondly about their four days at LEAP (Leaders Experiential Adventure Program). The experience brought people from different areas together "in a bonding way,"Carrubba sa

0 Comments

The Rehabilitation of N.I. Bukharin

By | May 2, 1988

Science in the Soviet Union, which inherited the Academy of Sciences founded by Peter the Great, is a difficult subject of study. Many war memorials in the Soviet Union carry the proud words, "Nobody forgets; nobody is forgotten." That is, nobody forgets those-who died in defense of the ideals of communism and the territory of the U.S.S.R. But, in light of others who perished, it might be added "Nobody remembers; those who do remember do not say."A number of major, but inconvenient, figures ha

0 Comments

Use the Media for Your Message

By | May 2, 1988

You and Your Friendly Science Journalist Have a Lot in Common. You have to take pity on journalists. Only politicians and lawyers are more universally despised. Scientists in particular have long avoided the press, for reasons that have ranged from an admirable reluctance to toot their own horns, to a less-admirable fondness for stereotyping. "Reporters always get things wrong,"scientists mutter."They take information out of context, they sensationalize our results, and they make us look like f

0 Comments

Who Owns What Biotech Staffs Know?

By | May 2, 1988

Switching jobs is a wrenching experience for anyone. But biotech scientists who move to a competitor face the added strain of a possible suit if they can take their knowledge with them. The problem is highlighted in a case brought by Genentech, the San Francisco biotechnology company. The suit, filed February 8, accuses five former employees of misappropriating trade secrets relating to TPA, the company’s blockbuster, new drug to dissolve blood clots, and other recombinant proteins after

0 Comments

A Common Ground For rDNA Adversaries

By | April 4, 1988

It’s not easy, at first sight, to discern signs of ideological harmony between biologists who are working toward the environmental dissemination of genetically altered organisms and “activists” who are deeply apprehensive about the idea. Look more closely, however, and one argument appears as a possible basis for unity: the need for far greater investment in the ecological research necessary for prudent development of this novel range of technologies. As reflected in the ag

0 Comments

Version 1.8 Analysis Technology Company 3914 Miami Road, Suite 310 Mariemont, OH 45227 (513)561-1100 Price: $149. Academic discounts available. Requirements:IBM PC/XT/AT or compatible. 512 K RAM. Minimum of 10 MB hard disc. Graphics adapter. Barely promoted outside specialist publications, IAS is a well-designed math, science and engineering tool. The interface consists of menus and submenus that stack and are visible simultaneously. Menus allow you to select basic math functions and severa

0 Comments

Borland International 4585 Scotts Valley Drive Scotts Valley, CA 95066 (408) 438-5300 Price: $167. Student version: $39.95. Requirements: IBM PC/XT/AT or compatible. 384 K RAM. PC DOS or MS DOS 2.0 or later. Also available for Macintosh. Eureka was designed for the popular market. It’s easy to use, nice to look at and fun to play with. Like many of Borland’s products, its appearance is spectacular. Eureka is oriented toward business applications, but certainly has many scientific a

0 Comments

Desktop Utilities for Your PC

By | April 4, 1988

Editor’s note: This is the final article in a three-part series on utilities for IBM PCs or compatibles. The first part, on enhancing input! output operations, appeared Feb- ruary 8, 1987, P. 22. The second, on DOS utilities, appeared March 21, 1988, p. 14. In this final installment, I’ll consider the so-called desktop utilities, (not to be confused with the term desktop publishing). When SIDEKICK first came out in 1984, it used the desktop metaphor in an attractive way. Just as y

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS