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By | November 30, 1987

In the interview in the September 21, 1987 issue (p. 14) Edward Teller says: I believe that this situation is a quite peculiar one. For instance, a number of technical people working on SDI have submitted to the Physical Society their arguments, to be published together with the original report. They were refused. And I believe that it is really a sad situation where, in questions of such great importance, free speech does not prevail in science, where free speech should be most highly honored

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New Head Expands U.S. AIDS Effort

By | November 30, 1987

WASHINGTON—The office that coordinates efforts among Public Health Service agencies to fight AIDS is being expanded in both size and scope, according to Peter J. Fischinger, the recently appointed PHS AIDS coordinator. “We want to get to the point where we are proactive in dealing with the problems,” said Fischinger, who is on leave for one year as deputy director of the National Cancer Institute. To do so, a new post of deputy AIDS coordinator has been created and the offi

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Next Time, Remember Ramanujan

By | November 30, 1987

One hundred years ago on Decem ber 22, a most extraordinary mathematician was born in the town of Erode, 160 miles from Madras in Southern India. Srinivasa Ramanujan Aiyangar was the son of a petty accountant and a bailiff’s daughter. He grew up in Kumbakonam, where his father worked. At the age of 15 he borrowed a copy of A Synopsis of Elementary Results in Pure Mathematics by G.S. Carr, which lists some 6,000 theorems but gives no proofs. Captivated, Ramanujan set about finding the pro

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In recognition of the longstanding need in the biomedical research. Used Equipment When an institution is awarded a government research grant or contract to perform work for which equipment must be obtained, it is a good idea to inquire whether the necessary pieces may be available through the Excess Property program of the particular agency for which the work is being done. Federal agencies that award research grants and contracts to profit-making organizations usually retain title to any

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NSF Seeks Data to Fill Ozone Hole

By | November 30, 1987

WASHINGTON—There’s a time for research and a time for panic. Despite what you already may have read about the reduced levels of ozone in Antarctica, NSF officials say that insufficient data pose a greater threat to scientists than ultraviolet rays. “Antarctica is a naturally occurring laboratory to get a good research program going,” said Peter Wilkniss, director of the Division of Polar Programs at NSF. “And we need to understand better what goes on down there.

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Ph.D. Helps Top Analysts Pick Winners

By | November 30, 1987

When Robert Kupor, a biotechnology consultant with Cable, Howse, and Ragen in Seattle, was asked by some clients recently to evaluate a company’s new treatment for emphysema, he put aside his MBA and picked up his Ph.D). in molecular biology. His scientific sleuthing, which involved poring over conference abstracts and talking with researchers, allowed him to judge the potential market for such a technology with an understanding that went far beyond the fledgling firm’s management

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Researchers Await Sale Of VW Stock

By | November 30, 1987

WEST BERLIN—Europe’s biggest private science foundation, derived from Volkswagenwerk AG, is counting on a rebound of world financial markets to secure the capital it needs to meet its ambitious goals for the support of research. A planned November 9 sale of the government’s 16 percent share in the auto maker’s stock has been postponed indefinitely, West German Finance Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg announced earlier this month. The value of the stock package is roughly $2

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A new survey based on a range of benchmark jobs shows that research directors and other top administrators earn up to twice as much as laboratory scientists. The survey of 5,000 employees in 116 industrial and academic research settings divides the work force into categories based on job responsibility. It ranges from those who direct 100 or more persons and whose duties are primarily managerial to laboratory scientists who work on a specific project. The survey found, on average, that pay

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Science for Women and Minorities

By | November 30, 1987

Why should we be concerned about educating women and minorities to participate in science and engineering? First of all, as American citizens, women and minorities have a right to a quality education and they should not be excluded from study in any field. Indeed, they should be encouraged to enter quantitative fields because we need scientists and engineers. Second, women constitute more than 50 percent of our population (and 44 percent of our work force), and by the year 2000 one out of eve

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Scientific Monkey Business in the U.S.S.R.

By | November 30, 1987

For some time now, I’ve been followmg with interest media accounts of the effects of glasnost on life in the Soviet Union. It’s certainly been heartening, for example, to witness the release of the dissident Soviet physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov, and Anatoly Shcharansky. Now if only another major Soviet science figure currently living in internal exile would receive a kindly phone call from Mr. Gorbachev! I’m speaking, of course, of Yerosha, the brave little monkey

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