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QIAGEN Ingenuity
QIAGEN Ingenuity

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October 19, 1987

Darkness at Night: A Riddle of the Universe. Edward Harrison. Harvard University Press: October 30, 264 pp, $25. Explores the phenomenon of darkness in the night sky by tracing answers and theories that in the past have proven wrong, looking at the structure and age of the universe, and examining the nature of light. BIOCHEMISTRY General Principles of BIochemistry of the Elements. Volume 7. Eilchiro Ochiai. Plenum Publishing: October, 450 pp, $79.50. Discusses global aspects of the biochemis

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Happenings

October 19, 1987

PEOPLE The Federation of American Scientists chose six new council members this summer: Julius Axelrod, Nobel laureate, National Institute of Mental Health; Deborah Bleviss, executive director, International Institute for Energy Conservation; Dudley R. Herschbach, Nobel laureate, professor of science, Harvard University; Art Hobson, professor of physics, University of Arkansas; Stephen H. Schneider, deputy director, National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Study Program and Robert A.

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HHMI Spends $30 Million On Undergrads

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—Taking its cue from recent studies that point to a funding gap in science education at liberal arts colleges, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has begun a program to upgrade science curricula at selected undergraduate institutions. HHMI has invited 76 liberal arts colleges not affiliated with any Ph.D.-granting university and 18 historically black colleges to compete for the grants, which will range from $500,000 to $2 million. The winners will be announced next sp

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Institute Tackles Minority Concerns

By | October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—Organizers of a new effort to carve out a larger role for minorities in science and technology, faced with a shortage of people in the various disciplines, believe the solution lies in part with making better use of the minority scientists that do exist. “The money is secondary at this point,” explained Melvin Thompson, director of the Institute on Science, Space and Technology to be housed at Howard University. “We’ll attract the resources we need by

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Iowa Ties Rebound to Biotech Express

By | October 19, 1987

AMES, IOWA—The idea that biotechnology can help pull Iowa out of its worst economic crisis in 50 years has won converts in state government and stimulated the interest of companies worldwide. But the millions of dollars flowing into Iowa universities have not altered the view of scientists here that basic research cannot produce a short-term economic bonanza. Throughout the country, states are scrambling to amass expertise in biotechnology and related fields. An array of centers of exce

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Narjes said he expected the laboratories now funded almost entirely by the EEC, to make up for lost income through contract research with private companies and national governmental agencies. He said the combined staffs should remain near their present size of 2,260 scientists. The centers will cost the EEC about $115 million in each of the next four years, with three-fourths of the budget devoted to Ispra. Established in the 1950s, Ispra has concentrated on solar energy, nudear safety and reac

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Korean Science Opens Its Doors

By | October 19, 1987

It has not escaped even the most casual observer that things in South Korea are booming. As H.G. Wells said of Britain in the Industrial Revolution, “Queen Victoria was like a great paperweight that for half a century sat upon men’s minds, and when she was removed their ideas began to blow about all over the place haphazardly.” During the Japanese occupation (1895-1945) and the strict anti-communist regimes since then, ideas in Korea have been strictly controlled and the coun

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Letters

By | October 19, 1987

I thank Michael Sokal for his warm praise of my book The Launching of Modern American Science, 1846-1876 (August 10, 1987, p. 25). I should like, however, to answer one mild criticism. Sokal feels that in alluding to certain scientific doings I should have described and discussed them in greater detail. In response I quote from my opening chapter: “Measured against what Europeans were doing in those years, lAmerican scientific] output was modest. The emphasis of this book will be on the

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Working with laboratory animals carries several risks. Apart from the obvious physical hazards of bites and scratches, animal research often involves biological hazards that exist because animals can serve as natural reservoirs for infectious diseases (including zoonoses), hosts in studies of pathogenic microorganisms, and sources of allergens. These hazards can affect not only laboratory personnel, but also other laboratory animals, including valuable breeding stocks. Infectious diseases that

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NEJM Raps Researchers For Publishing Twice

By | October 19, 1987

SAN FRANCISCO—What constitutes duplicate publication of scientific material? And what should happen to researchers who cross that line? The September 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine featured letters from readers who complained that an article on postmenopausal bone loss in the January 22 issue of NEJM was remarkably similar to an article by the same authors in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The authors replied that the pa- per

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