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By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—It’s hard to escape the dominance of Japan in worldwide technology, even if the subject is France. Gallic pride took a beating when its government asked American research administrators for their views on French technology. The U.S. executives said that France provides the United States with its stiffest competition in only two. categories—nuclear energy and aeronautics. The Japanese came out on top in a majority of the 11 categories, covering automobiles, comput

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By | December 14, 1987

LONDON—A consortium of four universities and three polytechnics in northwest England will host a new think tank aimed at improving Britain's ability to exploit its scientific research and development. The Centre for Exploitation of Science and Technology (CEST), funded by the government and private industry, is expected to remain independent of its academic hosts but conform to the standards of academe. Based in Manchester, it will maintain close links with all consortium members. CEST

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FDA Center Emphasizes Research

By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—Ask Carl C. Peck of the Food and Drug Administration how important research is to his job, and he’ll simply point to the title of the center he heads. Peck is the first director of the FDA’s new Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. He said he has an “upfront agreement” with FDA Commissioner Frank E. Young to “bring research and training to a new level of legitimacy in this agency.” The result, he said, will be ‘an emphasis on scie

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Feminists Ask, Is Science Sexless?

By | December 14, 1987

SEX AND SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY Sandra Harding and Jean F. O’Barr, eds. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago, 1987. 304 pp. $10.95. Science has been regarded traditionally as sexless, and therefore removed from individual and institutional biases tha may influence less rigorous, more interpretive scholarly fields. How ever, as the papers in this volume demonstrate clearly, the assumption of gender neutrality in science is highly controversial. Indeed, as women have become increasingly a

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Forthcoming Books

December 14, 1987

ANIMAL SCIENCE The Natural History Reader in Animal Behavior. Howard Topoff ed. Columbia University Press December, 245 pp, $17 PB, $30 HB. Collection of articles from Natural History that discusses new research on animal behavior, including animal orientation and habitat selection. ASTRONOMY New Ideas in Astronomy: A Symposium Celebrating the Sixtieth Birthday of Halton C. Arp. Barry F. Madore, ed. Cambridge University. Press: December, 400 pp, $49.50. Explores the present state of the n

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Growing Up Saturated With Science

By | December 14, 1987

U my life I have been on the edges of science. At the start of the century, my father, J.S. Haldane, deeply engaged in the problem of alveolar air, probably didn’t notice that I was having fun on the lab floor, playing with blobs of mercury and occasionally licking them. I knew even then that science was important; and I was very proud of having small blood samples taken for some purpose. Later my brother, J.B.S. Haldane, and I discovered chemistry and made splendid volcanoes in the gard

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Happenings

December 14, 1987

Edward J. Poziomek, former director of research, U.S. Army Chemical Research at the Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., became Sigma Xi’s new executive director on December 1. Poziomek joined the society in 1961 and has served on the board of directors since 1976. His areas of research include surface chemistry, spectroscopy, physical-organic chemistry and organic synthesis. Charles E. Hammer Jr., associate vice president for health affairs and professor

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I Am Not Optimistic

By | December 14, 1987

There are differences of opinion over the precise definition of scientific misconduct and over how to deal with it. We also don’t have a very good idea on how often it occurs. It probably is not unreasonable to assume, however, that it happens much more frequently than the few highly publicized cases would suggest—if only because it is unlikely that all instances of misconduct are discovered and, of those discovered, that all become public knowledge. Moreover, my own experience s

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I Turned in My Mentor

By | December 14, 1987

Although it is painful to recount, I think it will be beneficial to share my experiences as a whistle blower—in my case, a postdoctoral fellow who had the “audacity” to commit such an act against his mentor. I arrived at Case Western Reserve Univer sity in Cleveland in 1979 to do a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Philip W. Lambert an endocrine researcher. My first year of research went well and I was awarded a National Research Service Award from the National I

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Is There Room in Science for Self-Promotion?

By | December 14, 1987

Scientific fraud has received much attention lately, both within the scientific community and increasingly beyond it. In this issue, in fact, you will find continuing discussions of the problem and its impact. (See pp. 11-13.) Unfortunately, some journalists with a taste for the sensational have exaggerated its frequency. The obvious example is William Broad and Nicholas Wade’s Betrayers of Truth (Simon & Schuster, 1982). (On the other hand, careful science journalists have detected genui

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