Magazine

Most Recent

The Scoop on Science Journalism

By | April 6, 1987

Selling Science: How the Press Covers Science and Technology. Dorothy Nelkin. W.H. Freeman, New York, 1987. 182 pp. $16.95. In Selling Science, Dorothy Nelkin—author of books on such topics as intellectual property and technological risk—tells the reader almost everything he or she might want to know about the complex relations between science and the media. On the premise that the public gets its images of and information about science from the press rather than from television, Ne

0 Comments

WASHINGTON—Resignations of top officials at two biotechnology companies and predictions of lackluster earnings sent their stock prices tumbling last month. Applied Biosystems Inc. announced that Sam Eletr, the company's founder and chairman, was stepping down for personal reasons. It also said it expected third-quarter earnings to decline because of product delays and weak orders from Europe. Following that news, its stock dropped from $41.40 to $30 a share. The Foster City, Calif., firm,

0 Comments

UN Opens Trieste Biotech Lab

By | April 6, 1987

TRIESTE—This week Arturo Falaschi takes charge of 900 square meters of laboratory and office space in a newly completed facility just outside Trieste in northern Italy. He does so as director of the Italian portion of the new International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), set up by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) to bring the benefits of recombinant DNA and associated technologies to Third World countries. The Trieste lab and its coun

0 Comments

Undergrad Research Budget Up

By | April 6, 1987

WASHINGTON—The National Science Foundation plans to increase the budget of a new research program for undergraduates after receiving an unexpectedly large number of applicants from universities and other research facilities around the country. Rushing to meet a March 1 deadline on less than three months' notice, researchers submitted proposals to hire groups of students to work at more than 600 sites as part of NSF's new Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. Alan Leshner,

0 Comments

What Natural Selection Doesn't Answer

By | April 6, 1987

Alexander Rosenberg, in reviewing Richard Dawkins' The Blind Watchmaker (The Scientist, January 12, 1987, pp. 23-24), says that "natural selection… and it alone, can explain the most puzzling facts … that the organization of living things reveals." I beg to disagree. First, no scientist should ever claim that any one theory must be right. But more important, if one looks closely into the idea behind natural selection, it is difficult to see what it does explain. It does not account f

0 Comments

What Viruses Might Do for a Living

By | April 6, 1987

Imagine, if you will, a committee of our brightest biochemists meeting in the late 1960s trying to make guesses about what might be happening next in the field of molecular biology. If they'd stayed up all night for weeks at a time, it is highly improbable that anyone could have guessed that recombinant DNA would happen next, or that this research technology would soon become the most important advance in biological science of the 20th century, much less that we would be purifying and scrutinizi

0 Comments

What Will Gene Sequencing Create?

By | April 6, 1987

Human gene sequencing, the outcome of years of research in the field of molecular biology, has made possible the analysis, prevention and treatment of certain diseases and an understanding of the probable variation of the normal human genome. The urge to better human life has led to scientific advance to such an extent that it will soon be possible to create a human genetic map. But one must realize that a human being is a creation of a living being who has evolved through a billion years of adj

0 Comments

Where Can Science and Policy Meet?

By | April 6, 1987

Twenty years ago, the politicians began to realize that science policy was too important to be left to the scientists. Now, the scientists have learned that it is also too important to be left to the politicians. Both sides need to talk to each other, but they face each other across a gap of comprehension. As J.L. Heilbron pointed out recently (The Scientist, March 9, 1987, p. 11), there is a real job here for the historians of science. They have had to master the languages of both science and p

0 Comments

...And Grappling With Its Risks

By | March 23, 1987

Averting Catastrophe: Strategies for Regulating Risky Technologies. Joseph G. Morone and Edward J. Woodhouse. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1986. 215 pp. $17.95 The year 1986, which began as we were still reeling from Bhopal, brought Chernobyl's reminder of the international potential of major technological accidents, Challenger's reminder of the fallibility of even the most sophisticated engineering management systems (and human hubris), Lake Nyos' reminder that nature itself is not

0 Comments

TOKYO—An American physicist and two agronomists, one American and one Indian, will receive the 1987 Japan Prize at ceremonies here April 14. Theodore Maiman, the father of laser technology, is being honored for his work in electro-optics. In the category of improvements of biological functions, the award is being shared by Henry Beachell and Gurdev Khush. Maiman will receive a cash award of $330,000; Beachell and Khush will share an equal amount. The Prize, established in 1985, is awarded

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
TwistDx
TwistDx
Advertisement
Life Technologies