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New Products At Pittcon

February 22, 1988

Editor’s note: The following products will be featured at the 39th Annual Pittsburgh Conference & Exposition on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy February 22-26 at the New Orleans Convention Center. The conference is sponsored by The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh and The Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh. This 1988 Buyers Guide of specialty gases provides information on 59 pure gases and hydrocarbon liquids in up to seven purity grades, as well as more than

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Rx for M.D.-Researchers: Back to the Lab

By | February 22, 1988

Changing times have depleted the ranks of physicians who enter into careers as researchers. The shortage of physician-scientists has prompted the National Institutes of Health, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and similar organizations to offer fellowships and other incentives to entice graduated M.D.s into research careers. But these inducements may come too late in the education of a physician. Scientists often choose their careers because they were exposed at some point to a laboratory.

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So They Say

February 22, 1988

"Building More Barriers" "Sen. Rockefeller on Japan" "Space Flight's New Law," "NSF Director on Physics Funding," by Erich Bloch "A Time To Publish, A Time To Recant," by Alex Weisskopf "Political Promises," by Bob Davis "Getting the Best Science," by Anthony S. Fauci "Science's Stamp Collectors," by Luis Alvarez No doubt about it; science can be tough to put across, and the areas furthest from everyday experience are the toughest, so one might suppose scientists would be anxio

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Taking Philosophy a Bit Too Far

By | February 22, 1988

THE PROBABILISTIC REVOLUTION Vol. 1: Ideas in History. Lorenz Kruger, Lorraine J. Daston and Michael Heidelberger, eds. The MIT Press. Cambridge, MA, 1987. 472 pp. $32.50. Vol. 2: Ideas in the Sciences. Lorenz Kruger, Gerd Gigerenzer and Mary S. Morgan, eds. 480 pp. $32.50. ($60 lbr set.) Eight historians, six philosophers, five historians of science, four social scientists, three psychologists, three biologists, one mathmetician and one mathematical statistician gathered in the academic year

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The Paperless Analytical Lab

By | February 22, 1988

Today’s laboratories are besieged by demands for improved efficiency, increased productivity, improved data quality, immediate access to data and tighter cost control In addition, increasingly sophisticated laboratory instrumentation requires the day-to-day management of floods of analytical information. The traditional paper-intensive management systems found in today’s laboratories cannot address these demands or efficiently manage the volume of data produced. For today's analyti

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Things They Didn't Teach You, But Should Have

By | February 22, 1988

HOW TO DO IT Vol 1. British Medical Association, London, 1985. 266 pp. £6.95. Vol 2. British Medical Association, London, 1987. 208 pp. £6.95. Distributed in the U.S. by Taylor & Francis, Philadelphia. $14.95 each. How to search the literature, use a word processor, write for money and run a pressure group to change the law—these are just four of the punchy, practical articles in a series that is now appearing regularly in the British Medical Journal. Published in its entiret

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War Stoked My Research Interests

By | February 22, 1988

World War II had a major impact on the scientific careers of many of my generation. Among the more striking effects were those that converted biologists into radar engineers and in some measure contributed to the post-war flourishing of biophysics. For me the influence was less dramatic, but nevertheless drew me into areas that have remained among my major scientific interests. A few days after war broke out I arrived in Oxford with a Ramsay Fellowship to work with R.P (Ronnie) Bell on acid-

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Where Science and Theology Meet

By | February 22, 1988

In 1979, John Polkinghorne, a professor of mathematical physics and a fellow of the Royal Society, resigned his chair at Cambridge to train for the Anglican priesthood. In this excerpt from his book One World: The Interaction of Science and Theology (Princeton University Press, 1987), Polkinghorne—today the vicar of Blean, Kent (U.K.) —argues that the scientist and the theologian both examine the same world from different perspectives and that each can offer much to the other. My i

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A Utilities Toolbox for PC-Minded Scientists

By | February 8, 1988

Editor's note: This is the first of three articles on utilities for personal computers that will appear over the next several issues. Part 2 will deal with DOS utilities and part 3 with desktop utilities. What are "free" programs and "shareware" programs? Free programs are exactly what they sound like: If you can get copies, they cost nothing. They are often called "public domain," which is a misnomer since most In fact are copyrighted. Shareware is often confused with free software. Its ce

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Paris - The founder of the International Center for Theoretical Physics has called for extending the concept to other disciplines and eventually creating an International Center for Science. Abdus Salam has proposed a loose federation of new and existing international bodies that would study basic and applied science and science technology problems of interest in the developing world. (For an interview with Salam, see page 20.) The group would include the ICTP in Trieste as well as new or exis

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