Magazine

Most Recent

Changes Urged in Teaching Calculus

By | November 30, 1987

WASHINGTON—College calculus traditionally has acted as a filter in the scientific pipeline to make sure that only the best people get through. But some educators think the filter has become clogged, keeping many good students out of science and engineering and slowing the progress of those who do pass through. What’s needed, they say, is a new method of teaching calculus that is so inspiring that it actually pumps students into related disciplines. The first formal step in that p

0 Comments

Children's Books, Reviewed

By | November 30, 1987

Dinosaurs Walked Here and Other Stories Fossils Tell (Patricia Lauber, Bradbury/Macmillan, 1987, 64 pp., $15.95, ages 8 and up) is an excellent introduction to paleontology that discusses how fossilized remains of plants and animals reveal characteristics of the prehistoric world. Fossil bones, teeth, shells, leaf prints, eggs, insects and animal tracks reveal stories of plant and animal extinction or adaptation and changes in the Earth’s surface and climate. The text is accompanied by

0 Comments

Children's Science Books

By | November 30, 1987

Two things in my childhood contributed more than all the others to my choice of science as a career. The first was the $1 chemistry set I received on my seventh birthday. The second, of equal importance and impact, was reading science books. I read all the books on science and scientists that came my way, from the well-known classics to the most transient science fiction. Thus it is with a profound sense of nostalgia in recalling my 50-year love affair with chemistry that I review this selecti

0 Comments

Consortium Targets Business Awards

By | November 30, 1987

SANTA FE, N.M.—John Pearson, director of Michigan State University’s Technology Transfer Center, was encouraging a local entrepreneur to visit the campus to seek the scientific advice he needed. “Gee, I wouldn’t even know what to wear,” the businessman responded. Unfortunately for Pearson, the differences between academia and small businesses run deeper than apparel. That’s why he and colleagues in 24 states have formed a consortium of universities to help

0 Comments

PARIS—Czech universities and institutes of the country’s Academy of Sciences may be permitted to conduct research for industrial clients along the lines of a model already established in Yugoslavia and beginning in the Soviet Union. Speaking at the Czechoslovakian Science and Technology Information Center here, the president of the J.E. Purkyne University in Brno said that the five-year plans covering the nature and funding of applied research may be modified to permit such contract

0 Comments

Decoding the Music of the Spheres

By | November 30, 1987

The principal contributions to astronomy that I have been able to make in the past 50 years of my professional life involve the study of binary stars—in particular, pairs of stars that are so close as to mutually eclipse each other in the course of each revolution and that, in so doing, exhibit characteristic telltale changes of light. The importance of such systems is that they offer us the only possible means to determine the masses and absolute dimensions of stars other than our Sun.

0 Comments

Drug Panel Asks Protection For Volunteers

By | November 30, 1987

LONDON—The U.K. Medicines Commission is calling for a clampdown on independent contractors who hire healthy volunteers to test experimental drugs, but the code may never be enacted. The drug regulation agency, headed by Rosalinde Hurley of London University, wants a register of contractors, limits on payments to experimental subjects, and guarantees that the volunteers will get full medical backup and nofault compensation if they suffer side effects. Its proposal is prompted by concern

0 Comments

Engineers Need the Liberal Arts

By | November 30, 1987

In its development, the American engineering profession has drawn upon two competing yet complementary traditions: the hands-on, muddy-boots pragmatism inherited from Britain and the elite, science-oriented approach of the French polytechnique. Science and mathematics gradually have taken a central position, with emphasis being placed upon their creative application. The less theoretical “hardware” aspects of technology have been delegated in part to graduates of two-year technici

0 Comments

European Role in Space Strengthened by Accord

By | November 30, 1987

LONDON—Western Europe has solidified its position as the world’s third major force in space following an agreement by the 13-nation European Space Agency to develop its own manned space capability by 2000. The agreement, reached at a meeting earlier this month of ESA ministers in The Hague, also promises to strengthen the hand of the European nations in their final round of negotiations with the United States over participation in the U.S.-led international manned space station p

0 Comments

F. Mayor's Vision for a Renewed UNESCO

By | November 30, 1987

The,. election this month of Federico Mayor Zaragoza as the new director-general of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization inspires hope for the future of the agency. When 142 of 158 member states—an mipressive majority—cast their ballots for Mayor, they signaled a common desire that the organization move forward and, in the words of the new director-general, “keep what must be kept and modify what should be changed.” In choosing Mayor to g

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  2. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  3. Opinion: WHO’s Silence on Cannabis
  4. Image of the Day: Parting Ways
    Image of the Day Image of the Day: Parting Ways

    The Allen Institute for Cell Science releases the first public collection of human induced pluripotent stem cells that have been fluorescently tagged using CRISPR.

Rockland