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A Fellowship For U.S.-Japanese Harmony

By | January 11, 1988

Recent events have resulted in a great deal of publicity about competitiveness. Among the so-called races in high technology, the biotechnology race has attracted much attention and comment. In the United States, there is much concern about the perceived possibility that history may repeat itself, and that a technology that was invented in the United States may find its most impressive commercial applications developed in Japan. It is all very well to talk about competitiveness, not withstandi

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A Nobel Ode

January 11, 1988

A Nobel Ode STOCKHOLM--The Nobel Foundation plans to sell stock in a new firm being formed to preserve the value of the annual prizes it awards.. . . This year's prizes.. . will each be worth $340,000... . Shrewd investments in the past decade. . . have reversed years of declining value for the prizes, and have raised the foundation's assets to near the real value of the original estate in 1900. --From THE SCIENTIST October 5, 1987, p.4. Lend an ear to hear the story of my galloping succe

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Although Stanford University's Donald Knuth released the initial version of TeX (pronounced "tech" nearly 10 years is still one of the most powerful and flexible typesetting programs available. In 1982, Knuth rewrote the program extensively, producing the TeX that today remains unsurpassed in typesetting mathematical and scientific sumbols. Until 1984, it ran almost exclusively on mainframes, minicomputers and workstations; since then, however, a number of implementations have appeared for micr

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AIDS Work With Mice Stirs Debate

By | January 11, 1988

McDonald is on the staff of THE SCIENTIST.

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Bid on Einstein Paper Stirs Concern

By | January 11, 1988

Push Up Prices Very few ";first quality" manuscripts-meaning seminal works on a subject familiar to the public, such as Newton's Principia-ever appear on the market, said Dillon, a specialist in historic scientific and medical books. They tend instead to be housed in institutions, as Principia has been for the last 250 years at a Cambridge University library. But the record price does focus interest on scientific manuscripts, Dillon said, and plenty of Einstein manuscripts of moderate importan

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Biotech Centers Battle Industry To Keep Talent

By | January 11, 1988

"In terms of being a constituency group, the scientific community may not even exist as an organized body." That comment from neuroscientist Donald Stein of Clark University could also serve as the epitaph for the Washington. D.C based National Coalition for Science and Technology. Its demise last month marked the end of a six year effort to build a grassroots organization to lobby for more federal support for all of science. NCST never enrolled more than a few hunderd individual members and

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Biotech Centers Battle Industry To Keep Talent

By | January 11, 1988

"In terms of being a constituency group, the scientific community may not even exist as an organized body." That comment from neuroscientist Donald Stein of Clark University could also serve as the epitaph for the Washington. D.C based National Coalition for Science and Technology. Its demise last month marked the end of a six year effort to build a grassroots organization to lobby for more federal support for all of science. NCST never enrolled more than a few hunderd individual members and

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DOE Research Funds Left Intact

By | January 11, 1988

Pediatric Research Center Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh $15.0 Million Institute of Human Genomic Studies, Mt. Sinai (N.Y.) Medical Center $12.7 Million Science Facility, Oregon Health Science University $10.0 Million Cancer Research Center, Medical University of South Carolina $8.0 Million Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University of Medicine and Denistry, Newark $7.5 Million Center for advanced Microstructures, Lousiana State Universtiy $12.0 Million Center for Applied Opti

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Glasnost Helps Vavilov Regain Soviet Esteem

By | January 11, 1988

Dorozynski is a science writer and editor in Paris.

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Happenings

January 11, 1988

PEOPLE AWARDS DEATHS OPPORTUNITIES ETCETERA MEETINGS NEW PUBLICATIONS Clayton F. Caills, director-at-large of the American Chemical Society board, has been elected ACS president for 1989. Callis retired from his position as director of environmental operations for Monsanto Fibers & Intermediates Co. in 1985, and became vice president of Chelan Associates, an environmental consulting firm in St. Louis. Ernest L. Ellel, ACS board chairman and WR. Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the Univers

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