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BRUSSELS—The Commission of the European Economic Community has taken steps to promote a more open flow of technology information between members. Peter Sutherland, EEC competition commissioner, has been charged with drafting regulations to exempt technical agreements from Article 85 of the Treaty of Rome. The article forbids companies from deciding to share markets or reach any agreements that could impair free trade. Although the commission in the past has cracked down on efforts to share

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Eureka Project Is Now Wooing Venture Capital

By | June 15, 1987

Paris—The French-inspired Eureka program is hoping to forge links with the world of venture capital to finance a series of cooperative industrial research and development projects throughout Europe. The 2-year-old program features 108 projects involving industrial firms from at least two European countries. Member governments agree to help their own national companies, typically through subsidies, but do not provide direct financial aid. As a consequence, several small and medium-sized com

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FDA Issues Final Rules On 'Fast Track' Drugs

By | June 15, 1987

WASHINGTON—The Food and Drug Administration has given final approval to a set of regulations that will give some patients with immediate life-threatening diseases quicker access to experimental drugs. The rules have been revised in an attempt to allay scientists' fears that such a "fast track" would abandon traditional safety requirements and jeopardize clinical trials, and drug companies' concerns that it might prolong the process of gaining final approval. Yet the final rules may not hav

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Few Applicants Appeal Denial Of Grants

By | June 15, 1987

WASHINGTON—Last August the National Science Foundation awarded a $25 million, five-year grant to design earthquake-resistant buildings to a six-institution consortium led by the State University of New York at Buffalo. Five competing proposals lost, four quietly. But scientists in a consortium of universities in quake-prone California, led by UCBerkeley, grumbled in public. "In this case, peer review failed miserably," said Linda Royster, a spokeswoman for Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.), who

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For a World Science Association

By | June 15, 1987

Now is the time to establish an International Association for the Advancement of Science. Such a move would mark a major step toward regaining for science its international prestige, now so sadly deteriorated. It should be constituted from the national associations for the advancement of science existing today in the United States, Great Britain, West Germany, France, India, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere. Floated in the March and June 1986 issues of Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, the

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Forthcoming Books

June 15, 1987

This list of forthcoming books has been compiled from the latest information available from publishers. Dates of publication, prices and numbers of pages are tentative, however, and are subject to change. Astronomy The Classification of Stars. Carlos Jaschek and Mercedes Jaschek. Cambridge University Press: July, 432 pp, $79.50. A comprehensive handbook on the tools and results of stellar taxonomy, describing modern methods of spectroscopic and photometric classification. The Cosmos from Space.

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WEST BERLIN—Two scientific societies here have announced their opposition to proposed federal legislation that would contain criminal penalties for scientists engaged in most types of work involving in vitro fertilization. The German Research Society (DFG) and the Max Planck Society (MPG) have warned that "embryo experimentation in the Federal Republic would come to an end if the creation of embryos for research purposes is prohibited unconditionally." Tight constraints, the DFG said, woul

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Handy Guidebook for Authors

By | June 15, 1987

Chicago Guide To Preparing Electronic Manuscripts: For Authors and Publishers. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987. 156 pp. $25 HB. $9.95 PB Any scientist who is writing a book should be aware of this nifty guide on how to format a manuscript using a word processor or computer. The conventional publishing process requires a typesetting house to re-key all of the manuscript. Clearly, if the author's keystrokes can be captured in some way, there should be savings of time and cost. In pract

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Happenings

June 15, 1987

Don K. Gentry, associate dean of Purdue University's School of Technology and director of the Statewide Technology Program for Purdue since 1983, will take on a new post July 1 as dean of Purdue's School of Technology, the third largest school at the university. He succeeds George W. McNelly, who will return to teaching after 21 years as dean. S. Allen Heininger, vice president of resource planning at Monsanto Co. in St. Louis, has been elected to a one-year term as president of the Industrial

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IEEE Struggles to Engineer a Consensus

By | June 15, 1987

This is the second in a series of occasional articles on scientists' professional societies. The first, on the American Association for the Advancement of Science, appeared in the February 9 issue. NEW YORK—The planners of Session 17 had envisioned the usual dull lecture—dimmed lights, a slide projector, burnt coffee wafting from silver urns at the back of the room. What they got were undercover police in the audience, and lawyers arguing in court. The events surrounding Electro '87

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