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October 5, 1987

AGRICULTURE The Transformation of International Agricultural Research and Development. J. Lin Compton, ed. Westview: October, 260 pp, $19.85. Assesses the influence of experiment stations on agricultural research and development and the effectiveness of their research. Includes discussions of the role of women in research and development, the role of research and extension services and the linking of traditional and modern agricultural knowledge. ANTHROPOLOGY Almost Human: A Journey Into th

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German Physicist Forms Group on Global Problems

By | October 5, 1987

WEST BERLIN—A West German physicist has begun a new effort to mobilize scientific and technical resources against some of the world’s most pressing problems. The idea of creating a Global Challenges Network is a “crazy vision,” admitted Hans-Peter Dürr, professor of physics and director of the Werner Heisenberg Institute of Physics at the Max Planck Society in Munich. But he said that the magnitude of the problem requires a worldwide effort involving the most ta

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Goldberger On Education And Arms Control

By | October 5, 1987

Q: How healthy is U.S. science? GOLDBEGER: I think U.S. science is quite healthy in most of the forefront areas. In biology, it seems to be extremely strong. In condensed matter physics and related device physics, it’s very strong. In astronomy, astrophysics, there’s little question that the United States is the unchallenged world leader. In elementary particle physics and high energy physics, we have sort of a bifurcated situation. On the theoretical side, the United States is pro

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Happenings

October 5, 1987

The Association of American Medical Colleges has appointed two new executives to its Washington branch. Robert I. Levy, senior associate vice president for health sciences at Columbia University, will become vice president for biomedical research January 1, 1988, and Edwin I. Crocker, vice president for finance and treasurer of the AAMC in Mills College, Oakland, Calif., will become vice president for administrative services on November 16. Levy has served as dean of the medical school and vice

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Interviewing for Scientific Jobs

By | October 5, 1987

Too often “technical” people fare poorly in a job interview because they have a faulty perception of what is expected of them. They believe that having strong technical credentials is the primary factor utilized in filling a job. In fact, technical credentials represent only one of several criteria an interviewer considers. The very fact that you have been invited for an interview is a good indication that the employer is satisfied you meet the technical requirements for the positi

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Lasers Take Their Place in the Lab

By | October 5, 1987

RESEARCH APPLICATIONS OF LASERS Science. August 7, 1987. Vol. 237. Pages 605-625. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC. While laser scientists are busy worrying about femtosecond pulses, squeezed states and free electrons, lasers developed in the 1960s and ‘70s are finding their place in the research laboratory. Three scientific disciplines—geophysics, atomic physics and chemical physics—are highlighted in the August 7, 1987 issue of Science a

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Lessons From the Pasteur Institute Cancers

By | October 5, 1987

The Pasteur Institute is world famous for the science it has produced for the past century, particularly in molecular biology. But for the past year and a half, molecular biologists have been concerned about another institute matter: six of its molecular biologists working with the teclmiques of genetic engineering have developed cancer. What do these cancers mean? Do they show that genetic engineering is hazardous for workers, as has been suggested by its critics from the beginning? Or is

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Letters

By | October 5, 1987

As a disenfranchised victim of the peer-review system, I consider that the myriad proposals for modifying peer review are less than encouraging. In his letter “Can Peer Review Be Improved?” (May 4, 1987, P. 10), Moshe Wolman is more than correct when he points out the inhibitory effect peer review has on science. Innovative, creative ideas that depart from dogma are usually given unfundable priorities, especially when dealing with NIH. In 1985 NIH received more than 30,000 proposa

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Misconduct Plan Due?

By | October 5, 1987

HEDGESVILLE, W.VA.—Guidelines for coping with scientific fraud and misconduct may be drafted by a joint committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Bar Association. Draft guidelines could be prepared and discussed at the group’s next meeting in the spring of 1988, according to Albert H. Teich of the AAAS. Teich is project director of the subcommittee on scientific fraud and misconduct of the AAAS/ABA National Conference of Lawyers and Sc

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Missed Chances on a Hopeful Road

By | October 5, 1987

Looking back, my scientific career seems to have been liberally strewn with missed opportunities. In fact, right at its outset I missed an opportunity by force of circumstance. After a six-year break in my studies occasioned by service with the Jewish Brigade in the 8th Army during World War II, I began work on my Ph.D. thesis at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1947. The subject was a search for soil bacteria that would produce an antibiotic against typhoid and dysentery bacteria. At th

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