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TIAA Report Asks Choice

October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—A draft report on the nation’s largest teachers’ pension system recommends a variety of new investment choices for its policyholders—but still may not silence its swelling chorus of critics. The report by a special trustee committee of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) calls for adding six pension funds to the $63 billion system. More than 1 million policyholders have joined the system in plans offere

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TIAA Report Asks Choice

October 19, 1987

WASHINGTON—A draft report on the nation’s largest teachers’ pension system recommends a variety of new investment choices for its policyholders—but still may not silence its swelling chorus of critics. The report by a special trustee committee of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) calls for adding six pension funds to the $63 billion system. More than 1 million policyholders have joined the system in plans offere

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UC Looks for Payoffs from Weapons Labs

By | October 19, 1987

LIVERMORE, CALIF.—The University of California will continue to run the nation’s two federal laboratories for designing nuclear weapons, with a new five-year contract that nearly doubles its management fee. Officials said that much of the extra money will be spent on commercializing research from the federal labs. The regents voted 17-3, with one abstention, to maintain the university’s ties to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., and the Los Ala

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Well-Suited for Technical Documents

By | October 19, 1987

MANUSCRIPT Lotus Development Corp. 55 Cambridge Parkway Cambridge, MA 02142 (617) 577-8500 Price: $495 Requirements: 512K RAM, hard disk, DOS 2.0 or later Manuscript is a technical word processor capable of handling anything from a short memo to an entire book. Although it lacks “what you see is what you get” (WYSIWYG) capabilities, it is full of features that let you combine graphics and text on the same page easily, import data from 1-2-3 and Symphony and format com plex scient

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What's the Sporting Use of Science?

By | October 19, 1987

One of the most highly motivated scientists I have observed over the years has devoted much of his career to testing athletes for illicit drugs. He is an energetic man, a resourceful technician and a person clearly inspired by the goal of achieving total fairness in the gladiatorial arena. He argues forcefully for the proposition that international sporting competitions (indeed, any sporting competition) should be free of artificial chemical crutches. His ideal is the Olympic ideal—the n

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A Physiologist Who Never Said Die

By | October 5, 1987

CONTROLLING LIFE Jacques Loeb and the Engineering Ideal in Biology. Philip J. Pauly. Oxford University Press, New York, 1987. 252 pp. $24.95. Few scientists today would consider modeling their professional development on the life of Jacques Loeb (1859-1924). Despite considerable accomplishments, Loeb felt embattled for most of his career. As a German Jew, he was alienated from American academic and social circles, and on several occasions his religion served to limit and even deny him prof

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A Report That Brings Space Biology Down to Earth

By | October 5, 1987

A STRATEGY FOR SPACE BIOLOGY AND MEDICAL SCIENCE For the 1980s and 1990s. Committee on Space Biology and Medicine, Space Science Board, Commission on physical Sciences, Mathematics and Resources, National Research Council. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 1987. 196 pp. This report, which represents the collective thinking of some 60 scientists, was developed over the course of two and a half years in series of meetings of the Space Science Board’s Committee on Space Biology and

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WASHINGTON—Although women and minorities still make up only a small percentage of scientists in most fields, their presence is being felt within the governing body of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. This fall, for the first time in AAAS’s history, all four candidates for the two vacancies on the board of directors are women and/or minorities. And the next AAAS president is University of Chicago physicist Walter Massey, who is black. AAAS officials downpl

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Artificial Intelligence: Making Up Our Minds

By | October 5, 1987

MACHINES AND INTELLIGENCE A Critique of Arguments Against the Possibility of Artificial Intelligence. Stuart Goldkind. Greenwood Press. Westport, CT, 1987. 138 pp. $29.95. MAN-MADE MINDS The Promise of Artificial Intelligence. M. Mitchell Waidrop. Walker and Company, New York, 1987. 288 pp. $22.95 HB, $14.95 PB. After 30 years, investigators and critics of artificial intelligence (AT) continue to differ in their definitions of the domain and the fundamental claim that AI is or is not possib

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ASIS Marks 50 Years Spreading Information

By | October 5, 1987

WASHINGTON—As it starts a year-long celebration of its 50th birthday with a gala annual meeting in Boston this week, the American Society for Information Science faces a couple of paradoxes that together constitute an identity crisis. While the information industry is growing rapidly, the membership of ASIS is not. The society’s diversity, attested to by a membership drawn from a wide swath of academia, industry and government, has the disadvantage of diffusing its professional

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