Magazine

Most Recent

Biotech Centers Battle Industry To Keep Talent

By | January 11, 1988

"In terms of being a constituency group, the scientific community may not even exist as an organized body." That comment from neuroscientist Donald Stein of Clark University could also serve as the epitaph for the Washington. D.C based National Coalition for Science and Technology. Its demise last month marked the end of a six year effort to build a grassroots organization to lobby for more federal support for all of science. NCST never enrolled more than a few hunderd individual members and

0 Comments

Biotech Centers Battle Industry To Keep Talent

By | January 11, 1988

"In terms of being a constituency group, the scientific community may not even exist as an organized body." That comment from neuroscientist Donald Stein of Clark University could also serve as the epitaph for the Washington. D.C based National Coalition for Science and Technology. Its demise last month marked the end of a six year effort to build a grassroots organization to lobby for more federal support for all of science. NCST never enrolled more than a few hunderd individual members and

0 Comments

DOE Research Funds Left Intact

By | January 11, 1988

Pediatric Research Center Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh $15.0 Million Institute of Human Genomic Studies, Mt. Sinai (N.Y.) Medical Center $12.7 Million Science Facility, Oregon Health Science University $10.0 Million Cancer Research Center, Medical University of South Carolina $8.0 Million Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University of Medicine and Denistry, Newark $7.5 Million Center for advanced Microstructures, Lousiana State Universtiy $12.0 Million Center for Applied Opti

0 Comments

Glasnost Helps Vavilov Regain Soviet Esteem

By | January 11, 1988

Dorozynski is a science writer and editor in Paris.

0 Comments

Happenings

January 11, 1988

PEOPLE AWARDS DEATHS OPPORTUNITIES ETCETERA MEETINGS NEW PUBLICATIONS Clayton F. Caills, director-at-large of the American Chemical Society board, has been elected ACS president for 1989. Callis retired from his position as director of environmental operations for Monsanto Fibers & Intermediates Co. in 1985, and became vice president of Chelan Associates, an environmental consulting firm in St. Louis. Ernest L. Ellel, ACS board chairman and WR. Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the Univers

0 Comments

IBM PC Versions: Hard To Go Wrong With Either

By | January 11, 1988

PCTeX Version I .50f Personal TeX Inc. 12 Madrofla St. Mill Valley, CA 94941 (415) 388-8853 Requirements: IBM PC/XT, AT, PS/2 and machines compatible with the IBM line. 512K RAM. PC-DOS or MS DOS version 2.0 or later. Text editor capable of producing a generic ASCII file. Hard disk strongly recommended. Printer support: Drivers can be purchased separately or bundled with the program. Documentation: Comes with its own 254-page manual and a 20-page installation guide. Price: PCTeX (Includes TeX

0 Comments

Letters

By | January 11, 1988

Textbook Errors, by Stanley Kirschner Pigs in Space, by Charles Ditlow Archaeopteryx Arguments, by Fred Hoyle Japan and The United States , by Kenneth M. Matsumura I would like to comment on "Let's Put an End to Textbook Nonsense" (November 30, 1987, p. 11) by Stephen J. Hawkes. Basically, Hawkes is right. We should make a determined effort to put an end to textbook errors. Hawkes also points out that it is no easy matter to correct errors-even well- known ones-in textbooks, and he cite

0 Comments

Lust on Europe's Space Plans

January 11, 1988

The development of the free-flyer will give us expertise in many areas, including control over our own low-gravity materials processing studies and in the various areas of robotics which will be involved in helping maintain and service parts of the platform. In general, Europe will have more freedom than if it had only the attached module. DEPENDENCE ON PUBLIC MONEY Q: Would you explain the rationale behind putting large sums of money from governments, rather than from the private sector, int

0 Comments

New Products

January 11, 1988

LabTrak Schedule-Manager is a software program that provides automated personnel scheduling for hospital, industrial, pharmaceutical, biomedical and reference laboratories. The date files accept information on job types, employees and companywide holidays. The program then accesses these data to assign qualified personnel for each job and to coordinate employee days off and vacations. The program can also automatically rotate personnel according to their skills and the company's needs. The Sc

0 Comments

NSF Pushed To Open Up Peer Review

By | January 11, 1988

Agres is assitant managing editor of The Washington Times

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
AAAS