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In Vitro Fight Looms Down Under

By | February 23, 1987

PALMERSTON NORTH, N.Z.—A battle is looming over proposed restrictions on research involving in vitro fertilization (IVF) in Australia, a world leader in such studies. The extent of concern among scientists was evident in papers delivered during the annual meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science (ANZAAS), held here in late January. "In the coming months, the federal Australian parliament may well become an epicenter of biomedical shock," said Rus

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Interactions of Elementary Particles

By | February 23, 1987

Concepts of Particle Physics. Kurt Gottfried and Victor F. Weisskopf. Oxford University Press, New York, 1986. Volume I: 208 pp., illus. $13.95 PB. Volume H: 432 pp., illus. $45 HB. During the last 15 years, significant theoretical and experimental advances have been made in our understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. An elegant fundamental theory of strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions based on the principles of quantum field theory and local gauge invariance has

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JPL to Help Oversee Space Station

By | February 23, 1987

WASHINGTON—The hiatus in U.S. unmanned planetary missions, caused by the explosion 13 months ago of the Space Shuttle Challenger, has made it possible for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena to take on a new role as manager for a portion of the agency's troubled space station program. The loss of Challenger has delayed for several years planned missions to Venus, Mars, Jupiter and explorations of the sun that will be carried out by the Laboratory, which is operated by the Ca

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WASHINGTON—Maxine Frank Singer, chief of the biochemistry laboratory at NIH's National Cancer Institute, has been named the next president of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Singer, a molecular biologist, will succeed James Ebert, who has been president since 1978. Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1902, the private, nonprofit Institution has an annual budget of $16 million. It supports research in biology, astronomy and the earth sciences by 60 scientists and 120 fellows at five cente

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Museums Offer Hands-On Ways to Teach Science

By | February 23, 1987

NEW YORK—A 200-gallon aquarium isn't much to brag about. But the tank, together with workstations, microscopes, displays and a helpful staff, have made quite a splash at the new New York Hall of Science in Queens. The aquarium is one of more than 100 exhibits at the museum, which formally reopened its doors last fall after a five-year, $9 million renovation and a summer-long dress rehearsal. Like the museum itself, the aquarium exhibit is designed to "bring the microscope into the macrosco

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Mysticism Indeed!

By | February 23, 1987

Craig K. Svensson ("A Creationist Responds," The Scientist, January 26, 1987, p. 12) fails to indicate which Bible he believes to be the inerrant, infallible word of God. To believe in the Bible as the literal truth demands that we have found the Bible and that it be read in the language in which God or her agent wrote it, or in an inerrant, infallible translation of same. Mysticism indeed! —S. Roger Kirkpatrick Dept. of Geology, Marietta College Marietta, OH 45750

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WASHINGTON—Financial problems have claimed another victim in the science publishing field. The National Academy of Sciences has decided to fold its quarterly journal, Issues in Science and Technology. "Issues just hasn't been able to attract the audience needed to make it financially successful," said Pepper Leeper, a spokeswoman for the Academy. "It never really broke even," she added, declining to release figures. The 2 ½-year-old journal, aimed at scientists and an informed public,

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New Congress Prepares Lengthy Science Agenda

By | February 23, 1987

WASHINGTON—The 100th Congress has tried to set the tone of political debate in the country by moving quickly on several issues in its first few weeks. Its science panels have been equally quick to assemble their own agenda for the coming months. One group that is certain to vie for the spotlight is a new task force on technology policy that will encompass the effect of current practices on scientific R&D in the United States. The group, expected to be chaired by Rep. Buddy MacKay (D-Fla.),

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NIH Cuts Grants To Guard Budget

By | February 23, 1987

WASHINGTON—NIH is cutting research grants to scientists by as much as 20 percent to keep in step with a Reagan budget proposal that is given little chance of being adopted this year by Congress. Lobbying organizations for the biomedical community are preparing to sue the government to halt what they claim is a violation of the wishes of Congress and of the appropriate procedure to achieve such spending reductions. The administration, believing Congress was overly generous to NIH, wants to

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No Radical Excitement Offered Here

By | February 23, 1987

Radical Science Essays. Les Levidow, ed. Humanities Press International, Atlantic Highlands, NJ, 1986. 240 pp. $29.95 HB, $9.95 PB. Science maintains, quite admirably I believe, an ethic of absolute impartiality and objectivity. To what degree this ideal is approachable is another matter, one. often sidestepped by practicing researchers, but of great concern to those observers of science troubled by the political implications of technological innovation and the public impact of sociological or b

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