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December 15, 1986

This list of forthcoming books has been compiled from the latest information available from publishers. Dates of publications, prices and numbers of pages are tentative, however, and are subject to change.     ASTRONOMY 1987 Yearbook of Astronomy. Patrick Moore, ed. Norton: Jan 1987, $16.95. Summarizes the astronomical findings of 1986 and includes 1987 monthly star charts and a schedule for other events.     BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE Annual Review of Entomology (Volume 32). T

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French Teens Hopeful About Science

By | December 15, 1986

LONDON—Nearly 90 percent of French teenagers expect scientists to find a cure for cancer within 20 years. A little more than 40 percent believe science will eliminate hunger in that time, 61 percent think it will make daily life easier, and 15 percent expect scientists to have “blown up the world.” These forecasts come from a survey of 5,000 adolescent readers of the French general interest magazine Okapi. The results indicate considerable optimism about science coupled with a

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Funding Crisis Forces Britain Closer to Pulling Out of CERN

By | December 15, 1986

LONDON—A decision this month by Education and Science Secretary Kenneth Baker on how to allocate the additional 24 million pounds ($34 million) that the British government has promised to spend on science research is expected to push the country closer to dropping out of CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) and ending its support of particle physics. The Advisory Board for the Research Councils met late last month to advise Baker on solutions to the crisis facing academi

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Funding Crunch, Politics Plague Science Council

By | December 15, 1986

LONDON-A financial crisis and the politics of apartheid, played out within a continuing battle between the developed and the developing nations, pose serious problems for the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU). The Council, formed in 1931, is made up of 20 international scientific unions and 71 national academies and research councils representing millions of scientists in a variety of disciplines. For years it has worked to coordinate scientific research worldwide with UNESCO, wh

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Good Science Needs Good Reporting

By | December 15, 1986

Today's major research universities routinely “buy” scientists to help turn their most promising research programs into world-class ones. Why, then, after spending so much money to woo these big time scientists and their research entourages, don't more institutions do a better job of telling the world about the success of their research activities? Of course, many universities do try to publicize their researchers' work. But few devote as much attention to promoting re search resul

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How to Develop Link Networks

By | December 15, 1986

This is the second of three articles on micro-mainframe links that will appear in THE SCIENTIST over the next few issues. The first appeared on October 20, 1986. Author: RONALD F. KOPECK Date: December 15, 1986 You must give some thought to planning how you want to link personal computers. This does not have to be a lengthy process. In fact, the quicker you assimilate what you need to do, the better. But before you can begin to formulate ideas about how you will link, you need to have a clear

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Increasing Human Rationality

By | December 15, 1986

Although nuclear war is seen as irrational because the consequent destruction could extinguish human civilization and perhaps all human life, the advent of nuclear war is a real and present danger. We cannot depend on human rationality to avoid it any more than we could to avoid past wars. The problem, then, is how to improve the chances for rational behavior. I don't believe that we will become twice as rational by haying half as many missiles, or by moving them twice as far from their intended

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WASHINGTON—A group of public interest organizations has asked the United Nations to develop international standards for the re lease of genetically altered organ isms into the environment in the wake of recent experiments by American researchers in Argentina and New Zealand. The organizations, which included the Committee for Responsible Genetics, the Environmental Policy Institute, and the Natural Resources Defense Council, also asked the U.S. government to re view all federally funded g

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Italy Eyes Science Ministry

By | December 15, 1986

MILAN-Scientific research, long neglected in Italy despite its position as the sixth largest Western industrial economy, could receive greater recognition next year within a new government. A full-fledged Ministry of Scientific and Technological Research is being sought by Luigi Granelli, who for the past three years has been Minister without Portfolio with responsibility for both science and technology. He has made for-mal recognition of full ministerial status for his department a condition fo

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Date: December 15, 1986 BOSTON-A sharp increase in U.S. military spending for research on biological warfare agents has raised concern about its effect on related fields and sparked debate on the nature of the work. The Defense Department expects to spend $73.2 million in 1987 on biological weapons research, a figure that has risen from $14.9 million at the start of the Reagan administration. Douglas Feith, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Negotiations Policy, told a House sub-co

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