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D Budget Impasse Heads for EEC Summit

By | May 18, 1987

LONDON—The summit meeting of European Economic Community leaders in Brussels on June 29-30 appears to be the earliest chance to resolve the longstanding deadlock over a new, five-year European research budget. The EEC's Framework Research Program embraces several collaborative R&D projects. Britain stands alone now in its opposition to the $7.5 billion budget suggested by Belgium as a compromise between a much larger figure requested by the European Commission and a smaller one proposed ea

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Forthcoming Books

May 18, 1987

This list of forthcoming books has been compiled from the latest information available from publishers. Dates of publication, prices and numbers of pages are tentative, however, and are subject to change. ASTRONOMY Flyby: The lnterplanetary Odyssey of Voyager 2. Joel Davis. Atheneum: June, 256 pp, $17.95. Recounts the frustrations and achievements of project scientists involved with Voyager 2's encounter with Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. A Catalogue of Southem Peculiar Galaxies and Associatlons

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Fraudulent Papers Stain Co-Authors

By | May 18, 1987

SAN DIEGO—Young scientists unwittingly caught up in scandals over fraudulent research have found the experience to be a drain on their emotions and a stain on their professional careers. Interviews with nearly a dozen researchers whose, names have been linked to some of the best-known cases of fraud revealed that the practice of "gift authorship" has sidetracked academic careers, put federal research grants beyond reach and thrown into question other legitimate studies they have published

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WASHINGTON—An unexpected gift from the University of California has saved Issues in Science and Technology, the National Academy of Science's esteemed but money-losing quarterly journal of science policy. The university system's chancellors have volunteered a contribution of $150,000 a year for three years. The amount eases the magazine's $250,000 annual deficit enough for the Academy to rescind its decision to close Issues after publication next month of a summer issue. (See The Scientist

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Happenings

May 18, 1987

Paul J. Fink has been elected president-elect of the American Psychiatric Association. He succeeds George Pollock, who is the new president of the 35,000-member association. Fink is medical director of the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center, chairman of the department of psychiatry at Albert Einstein Medical Center, and professor and deputy chairman of the department of psychiatry at Temple University Health Sciences Center. Kenneth L. Nordtvedt Jr. has been nominated by President Reagan to serve

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How To Keep Up With Chemical Regs

By | May 18, 1987

Both the pace of chemical regulatory change and the pervasiveness of chemical regulation itself have increased dramatically over the past few years. At the same time, keeping track of changing regulatory requirements has become a much more difficult task. This is especially true for small to medium-sized firms, which often face severe budgetary and staff restraints when it comes to regulatory compliance matters. On the other hand, with such sweeping new requirements as the 1986 Superfund Amendme

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Hydrogen

By | May 18, 1987

"The fact [is] that I, a chemist, engaged here in writing my stories about chemistry, have lived a different season." For Primo Levi that "different season" was a place called Auschwitz. An assimilated Italian Jew, Levi quit his job at a pharmaceutical factory, joined a band of anti-fascist partisans, was betrayed and captured. At Auschwitz, he was skilled prisoner 17451Z forced to work in a chemical lab adjacent to the Nazi death camp. In 1947 he began writing a series of autobiographical work

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India's Scientists Seek Better Pay, More Perks

By | May 18, 1987

NEW DELHI—Scientists in India's government laboratories, unhappy over receiving proportionately less money than other civil servants, are calling for salary increases and more perks. Leading the drive are the associations of scientific workers of India's autonomous research councils: the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, the Indian Council of Medical Research and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research. The extent of the dissatisfaction became evident earlier this spring

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Kapitza: Popularizing Science on Soviet TV

By | May 18, 1987

Through his activities as a science educator and popularizer, experimental physicist Sergei P Kapitza has become one of the best-known scientists in the Soviet Union. Millions of people watch his biweekly television show on scientific issues, for which he received the State Award in 1980. Kapitza was born in England, where his father, Peter L. Kapitza, was working on low-temperature physics and magnetism at Cam bridge. After graduating from the Moscow Aeronautical Institute in 1949, Sergei Kapi

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Letters

May 18, 1987

Regarding Jeffrey Mervis' article "Many Questions, Few Answers on New NSF Science Centers" (THE SCIENTIST, March 23, 1987, p. 1), I'd like to ask a question or two myself. Does the right hand know what the left hand is doing? Why are we overlooking the fact that the NSF's Industry-University Co operative Research Center Program (IUCR) is an excellent model for the Science and Technology Centers? Why is Mervis raising concerns that have been answered in the course of the 10 years or so that the

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