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Italians Scorn Nuclear Power

February 9, 1987

ROME—Nuclear power is becoming a major political issue here as the country awaits the formation in April of a new coalition government. Last month a newspaper poll indicated that 72 percent of the public would vote to abandon nuclear power entirely, and a referendum will be needed if the Christian Democrats and their partners in the current government cannot agree on a policy. Shortly after the results were published, the government postponed until later this month a widely publicized nati

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Journal Editors and Co-authors

By | February 9, 1987

I am surprised that New England Journal of Medicine subscribers have heard no more from Benish, Cryar, Lind-Ackerson, Benish, Popp, Hourani, Rutt, Junger, Goldstein, Fibs, Barbas, Rist, Sugar, Cryar and Mellinger. You may remember them as the authors of a famous letter to NEJM in which they announced a tie for the honor of writing the paper in that journal with the greatest number of authors in 1985 (NEJM, vol. 313, 1985, p. 331). The accolade went jointly to Lauristen, Rune, Bytzer, Kelbaek, Je

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More Than Just Marie Curie

By | February 9, 1987

Women in Science: Antiquity Through the Nineteenth Century: A Biographical Dictionary and Bibliography. Manlyn Bailey Ogilvie. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1986. 272 pp. $25. Anyone seeking accurate biographical information about women scientists of the past will find this work an indispensable reference tool. This has previously been a very difficult and daunting task for the little available information was often scattered, sketchy, and at times erroneous or inconsistent. Just how much of an

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European Research Centres Longman, Harlow, 6th ed., 1986. 2 vols., 2,453 pp. £240. (Distributed in North America by Gale Research Company, Detroit, MI. $430.) Medical Research Centres Longman, Harlow, 7th ed., 1986. 2 vols., 1,080 pp. £230. (Distributed in North America by Gale Research Company, Detroit, MI. $395.) Time was when anyone trying to trace scientific organizations in countries such as Belgium, Italy or Yugoslavia had to cope with a series of national guides that were incomp

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Newsletter To Focus on Its Impact

By | February 9, 1987

WASHINGTON—The founding editor of the now-defunct Science 86 is launching a monthly newsletter that will examine the impact on society of advances in science and technology. The eight- to 10-page newsletter, to be called Science Impact, is scheduled to debut in May. Allen Hammond, who will serve as its editor and publisher, is no stranger to new publications. He created the "Research News" section of Science magazine and several years later persuaded its publisher, the American Association

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NSF Seeks Biotech Bids

February 9, 1987

WASHINGTON—The National Science Foundation, aiming to encourage interdisciplinary research and a more efficient use of expensive equipment in areas relating to biotechnology, is channeling up to $8 million this year into the creation of multi-user research facilities. The Foundation plans to fund two types of research centers through its new biological centers program. This year 10 to 15 awards averaging $500,000 each are expected to be made for multi-user instrumentation facilities known

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Organic Chemist Appointed French Science Minister

By | February 9, 1987

LONDON—An organic chemist with a taste for politics—a talent that promises to be much in demand in the months ahead—has been named the new French minister for science and universities. Jacques Valade, 57, was appointed January 22 to succeed physicist Main Devaquet, who resigned after his proposals to restrict student entry to French universities triggered large-scale and violent protests last fall. The protests appeared also to reflect a deeper unhappiness with the policies of

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Our Unknown Martyrs

By | February 9, 1987

Behind every famous scientist who died or suffered greatly for his work there stand in serried ranks hundreds of others—the unknown martyrs of science. For them there is no roll of honor, no shrine of remembrance. No sacred flame burns for them in any academy, and if their names were briefly known to colleagues, they were soon forgotten again. This is the gratitude of mankind remembering its unknown soldiers everywhere, but not its scientists. The dramatic accident of the space shuttle Cha

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Piltdown Proves a Point

By | February 9, 1987

In 1908, a workman digging in a gravel pit in the Sussex hamlet of Piltdown discovered a fragment of a human cranium's parietal bone. He delivered it to Charles Dawson, an amateur geologist and antiquarian, thus setting off one of the most controversial and bizarre episodes in the study of human paleontology. For the next 40 years Eoanthropus clawsoni was a respected member of modern man's family tree, and a representation of this distinguished ancestor stood proudly in the American Museum of Na

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As a freshman congressman in 1963, Rep. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Calif.) was an early opponent of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. Last year, he helped lead a successful congressional drive for a moratorium on testing of experimental anti-satellite weapons and supported a pledge by university physics students and professors to refuse funding from the Strategic Defense Initiative program. Throughout his career on Capitol Hill, in fact, Brown, while representing a district heavily dependent on

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